Dexter’s widow Maxine, responding to the honour said: “When Dexter Gordon recorded the album GO on Blue Note Records in 1962, he had no idea that it would become the classic jazz album it became. He loved the album because of the musicians Sonny Clark, Butch Warren, and Billy Higgins who, as he said, ‘played as one sound.’ I know Dexter would be honoured and delighted with this honour.”

More // Full list of other artists honoured

Agile interplay from Norwegian duo pianist Eyolf Dale and reedsman André Roligheten, formerly known as Albatrosh, Departure is to be released by Edition in May.

Trish Clowes

It's a 26 April release for new album Ninety Degrees Gravity by acclaimed saxophonist composer bandleader Trish Clowes. Fronting her My Iris band the album is released by UK jazz indie Basho.

Oblique, a little reminiscent of the style of Iain Ballamy, this complicated music, prog-like in places always pushes ahead and Clowes has plenty of firepower at her disposal plus lots of timbral resource complete with a careful command of contemporary jazz language that besides Ballamy also is reminiscent of some of Wane Shorter’s methodology.

Strong on both group interplay and compositional skill this is one of the most outstanding new UK jazz albums to be released this year.

Clowes has been selected to perform at the Made in the UK series to be held in New York state later in 2019 and she will be touring the album in May and June in the UK. SG
Ross Stanley, above left, James Maddren, Trish Clowes and Chris Montague. 

This is all about romanticism and beauty, a naturalistic arc at play always with the Italian pianist Giovanni Guidi, this latest studio album recorded in France extending his core unit by adding sax and guitar on a few tracks. Opening with the Léo Ferré-penned title track immediately we are in richly melodic territory and Guidi has that impossibly persuasive touch that invites us warmly in, the bass of Thomas Morgan almost desultorily picking out wistful ideas towards the end. Most of the tunes are Guidi’s and while the extra players bring variety I think the charm of the album lies in the trio tracks. A nice touch is the homage to the late Tomasz Stanko at the end. SG

Taborn and Iyer

There is an elegiac mood in this remarkable two-piano album from Iyer and Taborn, certainly in the spread of memorialising pieces, the choice of Cecil Taylor’s words in the title, and the all-pervasive sombre mood. But instead of grim endeavour carried through in a spirit of worthiness there is an alert, spirited life force at play and a great understanding that the two demonstrate of each other’s method and ideas. Recorded live in Budapest the live setting gives this a taut electricity and strength, all the tunes are Iyer and Taborn’s with a treat at the end reserved for Geri Allen’s ‘When Kabuya Dances’. If you want to know what the state of the art of jazz piano is look no further than this fine achievement by two masters at work. SG

Pretty unradio-friendly given the length of the tracks, each of the three clocks in at more than 20 minutes, the middle piece ‘Spartan Before It Hit’ ups the core trio ante by adding strings, the piano of Craig Taborn, and extra guitars. This is deftly exploratory improvising, Torn and Berne dancing around airy, tense fragments that summon a certain menace and this album overall has plenty of severity about it, an open feeling too thanks often to the way rhythm is sub divided or just shrinks back, and a sense that the trio are playing without any safety net. While easy to admire it is harder to fully embrace, yes the pieces are too long and there is a good deal of development that does not necessarily deliver the impact that this trio is capable of. The middle piece with the extra players is where the album really comes alive so go there first. SG

When Sting guitarist Dominic Miller was first signed to ECM I must confess a sharp intake of breath. Nowadays on his second release for the label, a Mediterranean baked wistful affair, it just seems so obvious. Manu Katché on drums adds beef to the mix which includes the gorgeously evocative bandoneon of Santiago Arias. Miller has plenty of personality up front, the bass of Nicolas Fiszman laidback enough to give him room while Mike Lindup’s spacey keyboards do not intrude. Recorded in a French studio a year ago tracks are kept quite short, at just under six minutes tops, all the tunes are Miller’s and they fall into what I’d call Metheny pastoral, nothing too twee or sweet but certainly provided with enough melodicism to tug the heartstrings. All in all? A really pleasant album that grows on every play and shows Miller’s writing as much as his superlative playing touch in the very best light. SG

Interesting tour coming up this... a UK premiere combining sound art, video, free improvised music with influences of minimalism, shockwave electronica and what the organisers refer to as “an unforgettable, immersive experience.” Fall-Out are World Service Project leader Dave Morecroft on keyboard/electronics plus Marco di Gabarro – drums/electronics and Simone Memé – video/visuals. Dates are: 27 April Take Over Festival, Colston Hall, Bristol; 30 April Number 39, Darwen; 2 May – Tin Arts Centre, Coventry; 3 May – The Regal Theatre Bar, Minehead; and 5 May Vortex, London.