The erudite Anthems is to be released at the end of September on the Sunnyside label. Seems a significant release although there is only one track from Caroline Davis and Rob Clearfield’s Persona to go on so far — delivered in for want of a better term, a “New Melodic” style: let’s shrink the wait for more somehow by repeated play and a little contemplation. That heard pedal point framework is a siren to an essence of song. 

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At last: to be released by DeepMatter on 20 September voilà PYJÆN: after a lot of promise on the singles so far. Leaning towards prog jazz-rock (Polar Bear at the jazziest end, Dream Theater the proggiest) on their latest sounds, but with a very individual and fresh attitude. 

The five-piece: Dani Diodato, guitar; Dylan Jones, trumpet; Ben Vize, saxophone; Charlie Hutchinson, drums; Benjamin Crane, bass; arrived first on the marlbank new band radar last year when they were touring. As mentioned back then: They can do hard blowing Brecker-esque tenor, Byron Wallen-like trumpet, wiry guitar, rapport, flow, ladlings of Afrobeat, an energetic pulsing undertow to boot: these guys are not afraid to wear their hearts on their sleeves. A London five-piece formed via friendship and study at the Trinity Laban conservatoire in Greenwich. Vize is a new star in the making. Surely his and their profile will soar given a bit of luck. There is also a lot of stimulating heat rising from the drums. Hutchinson makes me want to listen to a bunch of Greg Bissonette solos. Yep, it cooks.

While they can do all the above the direction is clearly more in a unique prog-jazz space and moves that style on a bit since the last innovations were made by World Service Project. Could PYJÆN be the Colosseum of 2019? Tremble at that crazy prospect.  

Concord are leading the way at the moment with release after quality release from quite a number of big and upcoming names. Long may it continue. The latest to drop online is promo for Mike Stern and Jeff Lorber Fusion with the deliciously incendiary ‘Ha Ha Hotel’ from Eleven, to be issued in late-September. Not at all smooth jazz by the way. There is a funky James Brown-like undertow in the response to the flying jazz-rock soloing here, the tempo completely ramped up.

Blue World cover

Blue World by John Coltrane will be released by Impulse! on 27 September. Featuring Coltrane with Jimmy Garrison, Elvin Jones and McCoy Tyner, recorded in 1964, this has not been issued commercially before by an official label. According to Pitchfork the album was: “Recorded at New Jersey’s Van Gelder Studios, the 37-minute session was made at the request of Canadian filmmaker Gilles Groulx, who had asked Coltrane to soundtrack his film Le chat dans le sac.” 

Press release follows:

An unreleased and never-before-heard 1964 recording by John Coltrane and his Classic Quartet, Blue World, will be released by Impulse!/UMe on 27 September. It features new recordings of earlier works which, in an almost unprecedented move, they reinterpreted for this session, recorded at Van Gelder Studios.

The album will available on CD, vinyl LP and digitally, and is previewed by the release of the title track, which is now available:

The recordings were made in June 1964, in between the sessions for Crescent and A Love Supreme. Coltrane had been approached by a filmmaker in Quebec, Gilles Groux, who was planning to make his film Le chat dans le sac, a love story set in Montreal that had political overtones.

Groulx was a devoted Coltrane aficionado, and via his connection with bassist Jimmy Garrison, he approached the great jazz figurehead with the idea of Coltrane recording the film’s soundtrack. Remarkably, he agreed.

Sp it was that he went into the studio with Garrison, Elvin Jones and McCoy Tyner to revisit and reinterpret some of Coltrane’s earlier works. The session was recorded on quarter-inch analog mono tape and mixed by the great jazz engineer Rudy Van Gelder on 24 June. Groulx, who had been present at the session, took the masters to Canada to use in Le chat dans le sac, but only included ten minutes from the 37-minute recording.

Kevin Reeves at Universal Music Mastering in New York has now mastered Blue World from the original analog tape. The lacquers for the new release were cut at Capitol Studios by Ron McMaster.

Devotees and new admirers will hear both Coltrane’s creative progression and the consistent, interactive sound that had become the signature of the Classic Quartet by 1964. The album is also a window into a fascinating and hugely significant period in Coltrane’s musical evolution, set in between two of his most transcendent recordings. Crescent was released in July, and A Love Supreme the following January.

 

Crepuscule In Nickelsdorf (Intakt Records) by Trance Map+: Evan Parker, Matthew Wright, Adam Linson, John Coxon and Ashley Wales, is a seven part mix of field recordings, samples from cassettes, turntable scratching and live processing of Evan Parker saxophone recordings. Think of the tracks, recorded in Austria on 22 July 2017, if you like as somehow figuratively conjuring a 21st century Turner electroacoustic seascape transmogrified to forest in a void far from home because all sense of reality is upended in the churning turbulence of dreams. Quite brilliant, especially in the practically patented use of upper beyond-ledger line partials by Parker — all sounds are hugely organic in the mix. SG *****

It only begins when you listen to... Robbie Robertson. ‘Let Love Reign’, the terrific latest from Sinematic, has a Chris Rea feel to it.

The Love Stories opener is a version of Frances Lai’s theme song from the 1966 Claude Lelouch directed film Un homme et une femme — in English A Man and a Woman. The Brazilian Elias remains firmly and even more resolutely an easy listening jazz singer on this latest album. At concerts it is also, worth noting, her pianism, an effortless Evansiana, proved overwhelmingly on Something for You: Eliane Elias Sings & Plays Bill Evans that can and often does steal the show. However, her singing style is a masterclass in softness. The bossa absorbs her. 

Hear Eliane Elias at the EFG London Jazz Festival this year. She appears at the Barbican on 22 November. 

Having been longlisted it has just been announced that the Fergus McCreadie trio have made the shortlist for the Scottish Album of the Year (SAY) Award. The full shortlist is:

Aidan Moffat and RM Hubbert: Here Lies The Body

Andrew Wasylyk: The Paralian

Auntie Flo: Radio Highlife

C Duncan: Health

Carla J. Easton: Impossible Stuff

Fergus McCreadie Trio: Turas

Free Love: Luxury Hits

Karine Polwart with Steven Polwart & Inge Thomson: Laws of Motion

Kathryn Joseph: From When I Wake The Want Is

Mastersystem: Dance Music (public vote)

Each shortlisted album has won a guaranteed minimum prize of £1,000. 

 

Tickets have gone on sale for the Button Factory appearance of Ezra Collective in Dublin this autumn. First on marlbank’s radar in 2016 alerted by their gospel, rap, driving bop and reggae flavoured EP Chapter 7 on which Zara McFarlane guested, the collective surfacing back then were all newcomers: Dylan Jones on trumpet, James Mollison, tenor saxophone, Joe Armon-Jones on piano, TJ Koleoso on bass, and leader Femi Koleoso on drums. This year the pace has quickened considerably in terms of their profile especially when ‘Quest For Coin’ from their album You Can’t Steal My Joy made an impact in late-April. The Dublin gig is on 25 November. Tickets.

Looking ahead to the Brilliant Corners festival in Belfast, dates, according to its director Brian Carson above: “In 2020 will be 29 February to 7 March.” 

OK. I read an article earlier titled “Britain’s jazz scene is in full swing” and disagreed with it.

Here are the relevant points why. The article runs in bold italic type, my notes on it are in plain non-bold type.

The idea behind this exercise is to amplify what is worthwhile and explain the inadequacies of what is not, in a challenging spirit of analysis, something that is often lacking in the day-to-day cycle of publication. Reddit it ain’t.

Jazz died in 1959. At least, that’s what New Orleans trumpeter Nicholas Payton wrote in 2011 as part of a series of tweets that riled jazz lovers the world over.
The author has picked a well known controversialist to begin with. Payton prefers the term “BAM” [Black American Music] to “jazz”. 
It later transpired that he meant jazz the word (which, he reckoned, was ‘a label forced upon musicians’) rather than jazz the genre. Semantics aside, Payton struck a chord. He fired up what many people for many decades have assumed to be an ever-shrinking band of jazz aficionados.
The author places himself on the side of musicians. However, the controversial intent dissipates rather here so negating the beginning. 
In fact, there has been an increasingly cool end to the jazz catalogue in America for at least the past 20 years. Pianist Robert Glasper and saxophonist Kamasi Washington are two figureheads of this stateside jazz renaissance, which is characterised by a liberal use of synthesisers and drum machines.
“In fact” meaning “indeed”; “cool” is misused here and rendered meaningless. Why 20 years only? Surely jazz has always been cool to use it in its correct sense? [Ergo in the 1920s, “cool” was already known as a term of approval and even reverence. Check the song ‘Cool Kind Daddy Blues’ for instance.] Oh, the worst clanger here: most jazz musicians run a mile from drum machines or use them very advisedly.  
In the UK, ears have taken longer to prick up beyond all but the most committed circles. Now, though, a jazzy storm is blowing through Britain. Some say it started in 2003 on London’s Portobello Road, at Mau Mau Bar. A weekly night called Jazz Re:freshed began offering a space apart from the stalwarts of the London jazz scene — the likes of Ronnie Scott’s and the 606 Club in Chelsea. Here, players were free to experiment and perform as they wished.
I think this is wishful thinking and just a way to introduce the interviewed speaker.
Around the same time, digital recording and publishing technology meant that musicians could capture and share material. Since winning an Arts Council grant in 2014, Jazz Re:freshed has turned into a label which promotes this body of work all over the world.
So exaggerated.
‘Jazz is having its time in the sun,’ says Justin McKenzie, the label’s artistic director. He attributes this in part to the fact that jazz has learned from rock and pop, where artists seek to brand themselves: ‘It’s not enough just to put music out. You need to be the music, you need to represent the music.’
Point of view only and fair enough. But do artists seek to brand themselves as described, really, truly?
The eclectic range of styles that Jazz Re:freshed set out to champion now defines the UK jazz scene. Seed Ensemble, which has strong Afrobeat underpinnings, was nominated for a Mercury Prize last month, and many more groups featuring influences ranging from Indian folk to ‘dark dub’ are playing at summer festivals.
There are several UK jazz-indie labels out there who have received Mercury nominations over the years (eg Dune, Basho, Babel). Fact. Jazz styles have been happily hybrid and inclusive of many other musics reaching back to the 1960s at least.   
 
Renowned DJ and impresario Gilles Peterson has given a push to the trend. He features many of the UK’s up-and-coming acts on his BBC 6 Music show on Saturday afternoons, has given the stage to them at his annual summer festival in the south of France, and even offers mentoring services.
Peterson has rightly given jazz a push. Not everyone however subscribes to his DJ-centric vision. 
But ‘it would be unfair to give people with a platform all the credit’, McKenzie says. For many years before the current cool, organisations such as Tomorrow’s Warriors, a jazz education outfit, provided the real bedrock of the UK jazz resurgence.
Big claim. Only partly true.
Now, it’s not just London that is enjoying this blast of new music. Bristol, Leeds, Brighton and Manchester are all developing distinctive scenes; and a similar new wave is sweeping Scotland. In Glasgow, where the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland has been offering formal education in jazz for only a decade, a committed — if small — set of young musicians is blending elements of traditional music with selected tenets of jazz. The result is virtuosos such as Fergus McCreadie who, at 22, sold hundreds of seats at the Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival this year. Reports of jazz’s death, it seems, have been greatly exaggerated.
It would be interesting to know about “the distinctive scenes” mentioned. Seems vague. SG.

Article appeared in The Spectator, link.

EST

A public never heard before concert recording by the Esbjörn Svensson Trio made in their homeland of Sweden is to be released for the first time. Issuing label ACT describes it as: “A concert for the ages: The release of e.s.t. live in Gothenburg brings listeners the previously unreleased recording of a concert to which Esbjörn Svensson (d.2008) referred in his lifetime as one of the best that his trio ever did. In this 2001 recording, e.s.t. played tracks from the albums From Gagarin’s Point of View and Good Morning Susie Soho. There is even one track, ‘Bowling’, which has never been released on CD before.” HMV Germany indicate a 25 October release date. Magnus Öström, above left, Esbjörn Svensson, Dan Berglund.  Photo: Tobias Regell/ACT.

Recorded on the road in the Western Sahara and Mauritania in October and November 2018, with additional recording in Tamanrasset, Algeria in December 2018 and at Abogi and Delta studios in Paris during January-February 2019, tracks heralding Amadjar by the great desert blues exponents par excellence, Tinariwen — are now online. To be released by Anti Records on 6 September. 

 

Worth your close listening attention: the first stirrings from Playing The Room by trumpeter Avishai Cohen and pianist Yonathan Avishai recorded in Lugano almost a year ago and to be issued on ECM early next month. 

The question in the headline above is on a topic that needs addressing.

Playlists, the popular ones are on sites such as Spotify and Apple, are one entry point to new jazz. Sometimes DJs also publish their playlists.

If you are a playlist person especially currently when “singles” are everywhere you may also be somehow residually an “album” sort. However, given the direction of travel at the moment and the lack of time that most people possess which often proves insufficient to keep up with new jazz and proves a struggle even to wade a little in the water, the chances are your “album” side is less evident than your playlist dominant routine preference.

Looking at playlists, some of these are very long indeed and tell very little about anything out of context. Only a few are actually full of brand new releases. Some contain tracks that have been around for months. Above all they are marketing driven however curated.

Do we listeners want to listen to something that is commercially popular? Sometimes but not always, may well be one response.

To flip that on its head if something fails to sell do we want to listen to something unpopular? Sometimes but not always is also a possible response in all likelihood.

Crucially jazz listeners need a complete album to listen to for the full story. Playlists, basically compilations put together for consumer or social, mood, lifestyle, channel, entertainment reasons, do not offer this ability. 

The answer then to the headline is “not really”. The question needs asking however and returning to as tech continues to change and playlists continue to be an important factor in the route to jazz listening and developing a love and knowledge of the music. They are, however, far from reliable be-all and end-alls in other words. 

Galway Jazz Festival logo

Full schedule:

wednesday/dé céadaoin 2nd october/
deireadh fómhair
1.00pm cormac mcCarthy trio o’Donoghue theatre, NUIG free
free
6.00pm the jazz ambassadors pictúir pálás €10.00 buy tickets
7.30pm in flow nuns’ island theatre €10.00 buy tickets
8.00pm bat walk galway cathedral free
free
9.00pm cormac mcCarthy trio blue note free
free
 
  time event venue price tickets
Thursday/
Déardaoin
3rd October/
Deireadh Fómhair
1.00pm david lyttle black gate cultural centre €7 On The Door
5.00pm books to die for / songs to live for                                            charlie byrne’s bookshop free
free
6.00pm official festival opening the kitchen free
free
7.00pm jazz from a window the blue note free
free
7.30pm in flow nuns’ island theatre €10 buy tickets
8.00pm lauren kinsella - saoirse an taibhdhearc €16.50 buy tickets
10.00pm zrazy black gate cultural centre €11.50 buy tickets
 
  time event venue price tickets
Friday/
dé hAoine
4th October/
Deireadh Fómhair
1.00pm Úna monaghan and pauline scanlon black gate cultural centre €7.00 On The Door
5.00pm anna mullarkey workshop an taibhdhearc €8.00 buy tickets
6.00pm Úna monaghan kieran moloney music shop free
free
6.00pm blue groove trio blue note free
free
7.00pm matthew berrill / Neil O'Lochlann / Dan Walsh                        salthouse free
free
7.30pm in flow nuns’ island theatre €10.00 buy tickets
8.00pm andreas varady trio an taibhdhearc €16.50 buy tickets
9.30pm house trio + colm o’Hara il vicolo free
free
10.00pm renaud garcia fons / claire antonini black gate cultural centre €36.50 buy tickets
11.00pm anna mullarkey / matthew berrill electric €6.00 buy tickets
 
  time event venue price tickets
Saturday/
dé Sathairn 
5th October/
Deireadh Fómhair
11.00am–10.00pm pop up record shop mick lally theatre free
free
12.00pm johnny taylor trio massimos free
free
12.00pm roxy's head is melted mick lally theatre €11.50 buy tickets
1.00pm róisín mulliez black gate cultural centre €7 On The Door
2.00pm joe O'Callaghan coffeewerk and press free
free
2.30pm bog bodies mick lally theatre €11.50 buy tickets
3.00pm chris montague workshop maoin cheoil na gaillimhe €10 buy tickets
4.00pm trish clowes / ross stanley cava bodega free
free
4.30pm lise-lotte norelius / soren runolf mick lally theatre €7 On The Door
5.00pm aengus hackett / barry donohue / matthew jacobson salthouse free
free
6.00pm brian fleming kieran moloney music shop free
free
7.00pm trish clowes - my iris mick lally theatre €11.50 buy tickets
9.00pm disconauts bierhaus free
free
9.30pm kaja draksler / eve risser mick lally theatre €11.50 buy tickets
10.00pm fixity black gate cultural centre €15.50 buy tickets
10.00pm house trio + richie buckley il vicolo free
free
11.00pm celaviedmai electric €8.00 buy tickets
 
  time event venue price tickets
Sunday/
dé Domhnaigh
6th October/
Deireadh Fómhair
11.00am art of the tree-o st. nicholas’ collegiate church grounds free
free
12.00pm emilie conway - the smashing red kite’s blues mick lally theatre €5.00 On The Door
12.00pm london gay big band electric €16.00 buy tickets
2.00pm joe O'Callaghan coffeewerk and press free
free
2.00pm dermot dunne universal free
free
2.00pm GJF ensemble masterclass with neil yates black gate cultural centre free
free
3.00pm sue rynhart trio mick lally theatre €7.00 On The Door
3.00pm london gay big band electric €16.00 buy tickets
3.00pm emilie conway / aengus hackett / damian evans salthouse free
free
3.30pm GJF@GUH - johnny taylor trio galway university hospital free
free
4.00pm darragh hennessy universal free
free
4.00pm dermot dunne tartare free
free
5.30pm daniele di bonaventura loam €16.50 buy tickets
6.00pm johnny taylor universal free
free
7.30pm house trio + neil yates il vicolo free
free
8.00pm nils økland st. nicholas’ collegiate church €16.50 buy tickets
10.00pm derrick mckenzie (dj set) il vicolo free

The festival website address for full details is galwayjazzfest.ie

Paul Dunlea

In a word to answer the question above, plenty. Site to bookmark for instance: Dublin promoter IMC runs an Irish scene listings service. The list at the moment details regular Dublin jazz jam sessions at the Grand Social and Arthur’s on Mondays, an improv special with trombonist Paul Dunlea, above, in Cork at the Crane Lane on Tuesdays and a host of other gigs dotted around Ireland. The website address is here.
• 
Another listings site Jazz Ireland is also available for a bird’s eye view of the ever developing scene.

 

Look for the latest from the distinguished trumpeter Wallace Roney setting the autumn agenda big time in a classic hard bop direction first listens suggest. To be issued on the High Note label as summer fades into early autumn when the full album is out saxophonist Emilio Modeste, pianist Oscar Williams II, bassist Paul Cuffari, and drummer Kojo Odu Roney are on Blue Dawn, Blue Nights made at Van Gelder’s in New Jersey. Guitarist Quintin Zoto and drummer Lenny White complete the album collective personnel. 

Wallace Roney emerged from the Ali’s Alley scene as a teen. With Miles he appeared on Miles and Quincy Live at Montreux. Roney is and remains a global force to be reckoned with. These sonic glimpses underline that. The countdown begins. 

 

From the press release:

“The nominations have today been announced for the 2019 Parliamentary Jazz Awards.The Awards, organised by the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG) with the support of PizzaExpress Live.

The nominees include a broad array of jazz talent from the UK jazz scene.

The award categories reflect the ever-increasing scope of talent from within the UK’s jazz scene: Jazz Vocalist of the Year; Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year; Jazz Album of the Year; Jazz Ensemble of the Year; Jazz Newcomer of the Year; Jazz Venue of the Year; Jazz Media Award; Jazz Education Award; and the Services to Jazz Award.

Following the online public vote for the Awards, the shortlist was then voted upon by a selection panel, who represent a broad cross-section of backgrounds united in their passion and knowledge of jazz. The winners, chosen by judging members of the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG), will be announced at the awards ceremony at PizzaExpress Live, Holborn, London on Tuesday 3rd  December 2019.

Kelvin Hopkins MP, Co-Chair of APPJAG, said: These shortlists demonstrate the wealth of talent and commitment that exists in the British jazz scene. Now in its 15th year, the Parliamentary Jazz Awards honours the best of British jazz. MPs and Peers in the All Party Group are delighted to host another ceremony at Pizza Express Live and we are extremely grateful to PizzaExpress Live for supporting the event.”

Jazz Vocalist of the Year

Claire Martin

Georgia Mancio

Cherise Adams-Burnett

Zoe Gilby

Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year

Brian Kellock

Nikki Iles

Jason Rebello

Josephine Davies

Jazz Album of the Year

Sons Of Kemet  – “Your Queen Is A Reptile”

Adrian Cox – “Profoundly Blue”

Fergus McCreadie – “Turas”

Jean Toussaint – “Brother Raymond”

Jazz Ensemble of the Year

Ezra Collective

London Vocal Project

Gareth Lockrane Big Band

Jazz Newcomer of the Year

Xhosa Cole

Fergus McCreadie

Luca Manning

Jazz Venue of the Year

Marsden Jazz Festival

Bebop Club, Bristol

Watermill Jazz Club, Dorking

Verdict Jazz Club, Brighton

Jazz Media Award

Jazzwise Magazine

Kevin Le Gendre

Ian Mann – Jazzmann

Jazz Education Award

Pete Churchill

Jamil Sheriff

Nikki Iles

Services to Jazz Award

Henry Lowther

John Fordham

Dame Cleo Laine”

Marlbank asked what the dates are, in which city they will take place, and if there will be a separate jazz event as in some recent years. Henk Elzenga, a director of the MOBOs replied by email: “We are hoping to bring the Awards back in November – we are working on it and will need to know soon. A day and venue have been pencilled in yet funding is the challenge. Not sure at this point what and if we can do anything around gospel and jazz specifically for that same reason.” SG 

Remember how Rymden appeared so stirringly earlier this year? Cast your minds back. 

Dan Berglund, above left, Bugge Wesseltoft and Magnus Öström whose Reflections and Odysseys was an 8 February release. In terms of tick boxes: yes to absorbing metrical investigation, lots of electricity, big bass and energetic drums. No however to navel gazing and ponderous pomposity which often bedevils prog-jazz.

This style is the antithesis of ambient Nordic spaciousness and it is a busy sound. On a tune like ‘Pitter Patter’ however you can source the sound back to say Chick Corea because Wesseltoft using the Rhodes electric piano knows that terrain inside out and manages to sound ahead of the game even when the sound of the Rhodes is everywhere this last decade.

‘The Lugubrious Youth of Lucky Luke’ is probably the most EST-like of all the tunes, a slow ballad that takes its time to unfold after a folk-ish opening melodic mood is established by Wesseltoft on piano with almost a country lilt to it.

‘Homegrown’ in a major rather than minor mood at the end is a beauty and shows this band are not afraid to use warm and rich melody, cadences to die for, to their advantage without being at all twee.

If you are an EST fan you will see how time is a healer and how too Bugge Wesseltoft is the perfect person to harness the beauty of that band and paint new pictures with the spirit and all that heart. Everything glues together which may have been the hope but certainly to these ears is the reality. SG 

Rymden are headliners on the final night of this autumn’s Punkt held over 5-7 September. 

A digital format piano and alto saxophone duo album recorded at Trinity Laban in south east London towards the end of 2016 is on release. ‘Majolica’ is a taut beginning grounded by Maguire’s very abstract sense of harmony. The pianist begins ‘Smooth Your Feathers’ in a more gentle, ruminative and balladic way: Martin Speake typically Konitz and Ornette Coleman-like in the sense not necessarily of timbre but in the jagged overlapping saxophone lines he creates.

‘Just One Look’ continues the conversational approach while ‘Prana’ is more celebratory, a fanfare from Speake to begin. Then ‘Mellow Eightpence’ is so quiet at the beginning and a memorable very pretty initial theme is developed straight off: the duo seem to be freest here in the ultimate sense of playing and not thinking... and yet are so lucid and creative.

‘Six Sisters’ again sits in simple melody and goes quiet as if time and silence (often the ultimate desire to achieve in every kind of music making either as means or outcome) are forefront in the mind’s eye.

‘Eau de Nil’ and later ‘Different Roads’ are where the album really gets interesting in terms of the piano lines. The Bley-esque Maguire thrives on the homespun aspect to ‘The Next Stage’ and we are back to the Konitz universe to an extent on ‘Wounded Landscape’ but Speake takes it a step further and this track is a wilderness of bass lines and rampaging bar-vaulting fourths and eighths juggling illusive atonality or tonality in its grandeur.

‘Dottles’ is free improv in the plinky plonky sense should you choose to use that phrase advisedly — I am being as accurate as possible and not pejorative — and as for the final five tracks: where they work best is when they find a simple theme which they often do and ornament it. ‘Armistice Sorry To Be Me’ is superb (‘Green Light’ the only weak track in an album of 16 tracks) and ‘Embrace’ finds Speake — think beyond style in a Britjazz timeline of alto sax icons: John Dankworth; Joe Harriott; Speake; Soweto Kinch — at his epic best. SG

Available via Bandcamp ***

The line-up for the Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of the Soho Jazz Week on the Soho-Live site is now available.

Wed 11 September 
Artists include Ashley Henry, Jo Harrop and Cherise Adam Burnett. Full list
Thurs 12 September
Artists include Christian Brewer, Aydenne Simone and KoKo Collective. Full list
Fri 13 September
Artists include Andy Davies, Quentin Collins, Kitty la Roar and her trio. Full list

The Soho.Live Jazz Week website is here.

RECOMMENDED

From the upcoming 16 August release of Crepuscule In Nickelsdorf by Trance Map+: Evan Parker, Matthew Wright, Adam Linson, John Coxon and Ashley Wales.

A seven part mix of field recordings, samples from cassettes, turntable scratching and live processing of Evan Parker saxophone recordings collective personnel are: Evan Parker, soprano saxophone; Matthew Wright, turntable, live sampling; Adam Linson, double bass, electronics; John Coxon, turntable, electronics; Ashley Wales, electronics. Think of the tracks so far as somehow conjuring a 21st century Turner electroacoustic seascape in a void far from home, all sense of reality upended in the churning turbulence of dreams.

Nerija

Enjoying critical acclaim and now experiencing initial sales success, Nérija top the UK official jazz & blues album chart — a significant achievement. 

Nérija are Nubya Garcia (tenor saxophone), Sheila Maurice-Grey (trumpet), Cassie Kinoshi (alto saxophone), Rosie Turton (trombone), Shirley Tetteh (guitar), Lizy Exell (drums) and Rio Kai (bass). Blume was released on 2 August.

Check out the woozy hard bop and Afrobeat-flavoured ‘Riverfest’ from the album, above. 

Try these sounds from the Mario Pavone Dialect Trio, the bassist in a cooperative trio on the title track of Philosophy (issued by Clean Feed) recorded in the studio last summer in New Haven, Connecticut, with pianist Matt Mitchell and drummer Tyshawn Sorey. Swings ferociously in a loose open style, a great deal landing within the freebop idiom. Snap this one up. **** RECOMMENDED 

Nathan Carter

Country singer Nathan Carter appeared on the second night of Shoreline and came on stage after the rain. 

Carter, from Liverpool who lives in Enniskillen, and who is the biggest star in Irish country music and has been for quite a few years, wrote a song about Enniskillen called ‘Island Town’ and it was fitting that he was here on the island itself on a big stage in front of several hundred people inside the castle grounds, a place itself mentioned, in the song lyrics:

The lights of the castle walls/they flicker across the water/and it seems to me/they have a life of their own.

Carter, top, photo: marlbank, singing ‘Island Town’ a ballad to add to the town’s own tower of song: the latest since the lively ‘Fare Thee Well Enniskillen’ was famously rendered by the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem. Stephen Graham 

11-15 September Lancaster jazz festival

27-29 September Herts jazz festival

27-29 September Limerick jazz festival 

2-6 October Galway jazz festival

11-13 October Marsden jazz festival

24-28 October Guinness Cork jazz festival

15-24 November EFG London jazz festival

Harish Ragahavan

Produced by Walter Smith III Harish Raghavan makes his debut as a leader — a quintet affair the bassist-composer joined by vibist Joel Ross, drummer Kweku Sumbry, pianist Micah Thomas, and altoist Immanuel Wilkins. The recording is titled Calls for Action and is to be issued by Whirlwind this autumn.

Harish Raghavan, publicity photo above

 

Via Pyroclastic Records Superbigmouth involves the collective might of two bands Bigmouth and Superette [geddit?] combining as one to play new original music by Chris Lightcap.

Musicians are: Craig Taborn on organ, piano, Wurlitzer; Tony Malaby on tenor saxophone; Chris Cheek also on tenor; Jonathan Goldberger and Curtis Hasselbring on guitar; leader-composer Chris Lightcap on bass guitar; with Gerald Cleaver and Dan Rieser on drums.

For the best of Lightcap in recent years, one example springs to mind so think back to Plymouth released in 2014 and on which Wisława, December Avenue Stańko legend Cleaver also contributed. Look for Superbigmouth in October.

The relevant date for the Patricia Barber Soho Pizza Dean Street jazz club debut is 19 November falling during the EFG London Jazz Festival. Joining the singer pianist in her trio are Patrick Mulcahy on bass and Nate Friedman on drums. Tickets.  

Friday 13 September will be the release date of the upcoming live album Reflections, Transformations, Improvisations by flautist bandleader Eddie Parker’s Debussy Mirror Ensemble. Tracks are: La Chevelure, De Soir, Little Shepherd, Claire de Lune, X-Boite a Jou Jou, Eventail, Syrinx, si doucement perdue, and Il Pleut. The ensemble made up of a dozen players spanning the classical and jazz disciplines was put together last year to mark the centenary of the death of Debussy for a series of gigs and spawned this recording made into their debut album.