From a Patrick Zimmerli composed and arranged album performed by saxophonist Joshua Redman and Brooklyn Rider. Briefly, what you might be interested in knowing as you listen and scroll: The eight compositions are from a suite; that suite, which amounts to (in record terms) a concept album is about light; they were premiered at top chamber (and occasionally jazz) venue Wigmore Hall in London close to Cavendish Square five years ago; album personnel include bassist Scott Colley and drummer Satoshi Takeishi.

In terms of style listen to Redman album Walking Shadows to get in the zone if you have time first. If you are familiar with that direction: no worries. (If you were not it was a Brad Mehldau produced ballads-heavy album characterised by an orchestral ensemble shaped around a core jazz quartet.)

Zimmerli is from New York and also works in Paris while Brooklyn Rider are a musically curious chamber ensemble who choose repertoire from many styles and who released The Butterfly with Martin Hayes. Sun on Sand is to be released in October by Joshua Redman’s long time label, the Warners distributed major label imprint Nonesuch.

Under half an hour in length yet pretty vital listening for anyone into drums, in other words and not only but also anyone into jazz at a deep level. Never mind the width feel the quality: if you think that an album ought to be 70 minutes long you will not be short changed it is worth adding.

Dave Smith, well known on the jazz scene, for instance marlbank caught him back in 2014 with Strobes, Dan Nicholls’ group that also featured the guitar and electronics of Matt Calvert plus the pin sharp visuals of Screwgun label graphic artist Stephen Byram on the big screen behind them. The rapport between all three that time was immediate and Smith came into his own all guns blazing. 

Beyond the jazz world and, maximum kudos among rockers, Dave Smith is also known for touring with Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant’s acclaimed Americana-loving globetrotters. 

Live at The Vortex Solo Drums + Electronics 11.11.17 recorded during the London Jazz Festival is a different kettle of fish entirely. A solo drums album labour of love it is on one level a specialist thing but a wider audience ought to get it too. N.B the electronics do not get in the way too much, they really just act as a kind of sonic ceremonial incense or put another way the radar screen on which the rhythms can be viewed spanning an ocean of sound. Antonio Sánchez in his score for Birdman which was solo drums entirely changed things in recent years because he made it plain to a non-specialist movie audience (if not the Oscar rulers who chin stroked the superb music out of contention in the end) the notion that a drum solo or number of such thereof are valid as composition.

Live at the Vortex... similarly tells a story; there is a certain arc to the abstraction of percussion; and a thought process at play which is most significant. Shut your eyes and listen. You will get something out of this that you have never heard before. And yet you may not be able to put that feeling into words but the feeling will exist and release vivid impressions that will remain with you, pulsing. Just released. Available via Bandcamp. ****