Falling a month before the anniversary is marked of the release 60 years ago of Time Out, Dave Brubeck’s Time Out by Stephen A. Crist arrives as the first of two new Brubeck themed books. 

To be issued in the Oxford Studies in Recorded Jazz series the Crist book is described by its publisher as “the first full-length study of Time Out, providing an insider’s look at Brubeck's life and work”. The author is a professor of music history at Atlanta’s Emory University and who according to his university biography works largely in European music of the sixteenth through to the eighteenth centuries, with additional interests in hymnody and jazz. 

Interest in Brubeck also extends to a second book, a so-called “investigative biography” and titled Dave Brubeck: A Life in Time by UK based music journalist Philip Clark which is to be published in February next year.

Publisher Da Capo describes the Clark book as based on the access to Brubeck that the author gained during a Brubeck tour 16 years ago. “Structured around Clark’s extended interview and intensive new research,” Da Capo goes on to claim that “A Life in Time tells one of the last untold stories of jazz, unearthing the secret history of ‘Take Five’ and many hitherto unknown aspects of Brubeck’s early career.” 

Tcha Limberger

Directed by Dolma’s Daughters film maker Ádám Miklós and written by the London based Hungarian Yvonne Bauer A Magyar Nóta: Belga Mestere literally Belgian Master of Hungarian Song is a truly remarkable and quite moving insight about the music and life of the extraordinary violinist Tcha Limberger, a blind violin virtuoso from Belgium who discovers traditional Hungarian music and moves to Hungary to master it. Limberger fell in love with the long forgotten Hungarian nóta style and made it his mission to introduce it to the world. The film makers ask the questions why does he want to learn a music genre that has almost been forgotten by Hungarians; and why does he leave the security of his Belgian home to live in a Transylvanian village?

Shot in Hungary, Transylvania and Belgium the sound quality is excellent and the Transylvanian scenes are especially very beautifully filmed, the quality of the light is stunning: a scene towards the end of the film has a gathering of fiddlers that is epic and life affirming. Responding to marlbank’s comment that Limberger is up there with Roby Lakatos no less, writer Yvonne Bauer says: “Roby Lakatos himself is of the best opinion on Tcha! He said that Tcha follows in the footsteps of the great old masters in that he plays according to the most ancient rules, which few other musicians do these days. All of them try to sound more modern, just like Roby himself.” 
Tcha Limberger appears at Le Quecumbar in London on 2 November.

Mark, heading down the 606 to hear a 13-piece do some 5/4s  this lunchtime – meet you around seven minutes past one after I jump off the 319?” 

“Don’t mind if I do, big Suze.

Readers love a good trio – we salute you and echo that emotion. Most jazz fans are the very same and like a small outfit, “small” as in 9 and under – that is: The quintet or sextet is a perfection just as much as the trio. Think Kind of Blue. Subtract, peel away, to just the one, ah get you... Köln Concert. Numbers... yep we are comfortably numb to as many or as few. The notion that a number is what counts is however absurd.