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Jaki Byard above left and Tommy Flanagan

Monday sees the release of Tommy Flanagan and Jaki Byard’s The Magic of 2: Live at Keystone Korner available on CD and vinyl. Housed in CD format in a sturdy stiffly-boarded digipak with a picture of the street sign of San Francisco club Keystone Korner, where the album was recorded on a February night in 1982, on the inside front and a full plate photograph of the pianists on the inside back, the music is annotated carefully with producer Zev Feldman doing the introduction and then a note from the first voice actually on the record Todd Barkan, who was general manager of the Korner and now after a spell at Jazz@Lincoln Center is at Iridium in New York city.

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Barkan used to record artists at the club on cassette and explains that: “From 1972-1983 Tommy and Jaki both came out from New York to play regularly at Keystone Korner in San Francisco, singularly leading their own bands, and together for a total of two weeks.” In his introduction on the first track from the stage Barkan then continues the praise by quoting club favourite Rahsaan Roland Kirk as he introduces Byard as “the emperor of creative jazz piano” while reserving lavish praise on Flanagan as well. The songs in the set are Bird’s ‘Scrapple From The Apple’; Cole Porter’s ‘Just One Of Those Things’; Ellington’s ‘Satin Doll’; Strayhorn’s ‘Something To Live For’; and Stevie Wonder’s ‘Send One Your Love’ with an extensive quotation, the main talking point of the whole set, from ‘Giant Steps’ performed by Byard not Flanagan who of course played the epic Coltrane composition on the original Atlantic studio album of the same name. Later Tadd Dameron’s ‘Our Delight’ is probably the most orthodox bebop rendering of the album, with a lovely little ‘English Country Garden’ quotation at the end, while the album is steeped in Ellingtonia that Tommy Flanagan himself alludes to in his brief words before the quietly moving ‘Something To Love For’ (he says “Jaki Byard just quit” [to laughter] so it gives me a chance to play something alone, see”).

The album also includes Strayhorn’s ‘All Day Long’; the standard ‘Sunday’; Strayhorn’s ‘Chelsea Bridge’; an oddity in Chuck Mangione’s ‘Land of Make Believe’, which Renee Rosnes and Bill Charlap in a note towards the end of the CD booklet says “finds Jaki in a freer zone. You can hear Jaki’s humour and intensity.” A seven-and-a-half minute version of Miles’ ‘The Theme’ completes The Magic of 2. Distinguished jazz writer Howard Mandel and historian Dan Morgenstern contribute to the scholarship in the album’s booklet and Mandel quotes Jason Moran who took lessons from Byard interestingly, with the pianist commenting: “I think of Tommy as a legato player, Jaki as a staccato player. Tommy slides through the rhythm, each move well-calculated, while Jaki is trying to up-end the structure all the time. Tommy plays within the steps of the tune, and Jaki plays these large intervals, which are strangely beautiful.”

And the beauty is there particularly on Flanagan’s solo take on ‘Chelsea Bridge’, while Byard is possibly at his best on ‘Send One Your Love’ the Wonder tune from Secret Life of Plants released three years before this club date. The sound quality while good isn’t totally pristine possibly this is down to the fact that the source is from cassette tape but it’s perfectly acceptable and creates no barrier to enjoyment, the only downside is that there’s too much piano bass at times and the treble sound is not as clear as it could be. Byard died in 1999 and Flanagan in 2001. This release keeps memory of these departed mastiers alive by the care and attention to detail the producers exhibit. Their music making continues to give joy and pleasure, and Resonance once more have made a big contribution to curating jazz from yesteryear. Stephen Graham     

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I’m grateful to jazz writer Selwyn Harris, the compiler and producer of acclaimed box sets Film Noir and Beat, Square and Cool  for news of a special screening tomorrow afternoon of Ascenseur pour l’échafaud (‘Lift to the Scaffold’) at the Institut Français’ Ciné Lumière in London. The 88 minute-long black and white film in French with English subtitles dates back to 1958, and was directed by Louis Malle at the beginning of his career. The film starred Jeanne Moreau and Maurice Ronet, and featured an atmospheric soundtrack composed and performed on by Miles Davis. The story revolves around Florence Carala and her lover Julien’s conspiracy to murder Florence’s husband by faking a suicide, but a forgotten-about rope and a malfunctioning lift complicate the pair’s murderous intent. Lift to the Scaffold was a first feature for the influential director who would later become known to a new generation in America with the effectively elegiac Atlantic City with Burt Lancaster and Susan Sarandon, and his late masterpiece Au Revoir les Enfants. For more details and ticket information go to www.institut-francais.org.uk

Jeanne Moreau as Florence Carala above in a still from Ascenseur pour l’échafaud. Watch a scene from the film with music by Miles Davis here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1OKQdp6iGUk

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Before Duck Baker’s gig last night a fan who had travelled across London to Dalston from Croydon was recalling the first time he had heard the player, as he remembered in an obscure part of Hampshire. “Hope he plays ‘Zebra Blues’." Baker, an American avant gardist known for his work with Eugene Chadbourne and John Zorn, didn’t get round to ‘Zebra Blues’ at least in the first set but began instead with ‘Friday’ firmly in Jimmy Giuffre-land with a lively Alex Ward on clarinet. Decoy’s John Edwards was on bass with his bandmate Steve Noble either joining the trio on drums or sitting out as the quartet became a trio before our very eyes.

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Duck Baker above left before the gig and top  

“The balance all right out there?” asked Baker near the beginning. “You can hear the trumpet?” This bit of banter was typical of the guitarist’s agreeably droll humour and luckily there were plenty of people in the club to hear it and this fine performance, and more came in as the set progressed to fill the place, and the musicians responded to the congenial atmosphere. The quirkiness of ‘The Odd Fellows’ March’ which was where Noble took the loping gait of the tune under his wing coaxing the band along like Han Bennink might the ICP. ‘There’s No Time Like The Past’ was where the band hit their stride and their humour collided perfectly with Baker’s on ‘Ode to Joe’, a rewriting of Beethoven’s ‘Ode to Joy’ leaving out “mostly every seven notes”, Baker said, the 63-year-old Washington DC-born musician a little amused. His own ballad ‘Always’ near the end showed great control at low volume and Baker’s grasp of bebop harmonies to render them not too twangy on the nylon strings and his dextrous navigational sense at the frets was always sure-fingered. Sometimes his sound resembled the approach of Jim Hall, but with more of an avant edge. ‘The Legend of the Legend of Bebop’ at the end (a play on words and reference to Ornette’s tune from The Art of The Improvisers) was a case of keeping the very best to last, its sinuous labyrinthine swing a good way to go to the break. Wonder if they played ‘Zebra Blues’ in the second half? That would have sent the Baker fan from earlier back to Croydon a happy man. Stephen Graham

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Iiro Rantala/Michael Wollny/Leszek Możdżer
Jazz at Berlin Philharmonic I
ACT **** RECOMMENDED
Interesting for a number of reasons chief among them the fact that the concert was able to take place at the home of the Berlin Philharmonic, in the Kammermusiksaal, the chamber music room, at all. Also of topical interest is the presence of Iiro Rantala, now confirmed as the pianist at the first EST Symphonic concert to take place in Stockholm in June. In a double piano setting with [em]’s Michael Wollny the pair fittingly perform the Finn’s composition ‘Tears for Esbjörn’, the lovely melody of which curiously recalls Phil Collins’ ‘Another Day in Paradise’ in the harmonic setting of the opening notes of the main theme. The sound of this album is as you’d expect given the acoustics of the room, pianos utilised and the quality of ACT album sound, very fine with the audience applause superbly captured, a sure indication as well of the album’s live feel. These three pianists comprise a troika of ACT’s stellar front line main piano jazz talent (the others including Vijay Iyer, Gwilym Simcock, and the veteran Joachim Kühn) an aggregation few labels are able to match globally. Rantala, Wollny and Możdżer come together to play Chick Corea’s ‘Armando’s Rumba’ at the end in a dazzling piano and Rhodes display but highlights for me were Rantala’s measured Jarrett-esque arrangement of ‘Aria and Goldberg Variation’ (which turns into ‘All the Things You Are’ by the end), and Możdżer’s modulating pointilist tour de force ‘No Message’ half way through.

A dazzling December night at the  Berlin Phil: the cover of Jazz at Berlin Philharmonic I, above

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Joe Morello above left, Eugene Wright, Tony Bennett, and Dave Brubeck

In the White House of President John F Kennedy two jazz legends came together for a concert that has never before been issued in full. It was a special time and a place in American history, but the long wait for the recordings in full to see the light of day for the first time is almost over.  RPM/Columbia/Legacy recordings are recalling this brief glimpse of the Camelot years with the release of the meeting of Tony Bennett and the late Dave Brubeck in what’s being dubbed “the White House sessions" and officially Bennett & Brubeck: Live at the Washington Monument.

It was 28 August 1962, but the record company only dusted down the Teo Macero produced master tapes in the Sony vaults just in December not long after Brubeck’s death at the age of 91 to ready the process it takes for a release. Next month the recordings are released in their entirety for the first time. The show, a party thrown by President Kennedy for college students working as interns for the administration, was recorded in the Sylvan Theater in the grounds of the White House with the Washington Monument in the near distance. The plan had been to stage the concert in the Rose Garden, but there were too many people to accommodate so the venue switch was made. Bennett was on an early career high in 1962 having released what became the song most identified with the singer, ‘I Left My Heart in San Francisco’. But he and Brubeck didn’t work together again until four years ago at the Newport jazz festival which adds further to the interest in this 1962 collaboration.

The recordings begin with an introduction by New York radio DJ William B Williams, then Paul Desmond’s ‘Take Five’, a band introduction, ‘Nomad’, ‘Thank you Dziekuje’ [that’s Polish for “thank you"], and ‘Castilian Blues’, performed by the classic Brubeck quartet (the pianist plus Paul Desmond, alto sax; Eugene Wright, bass; and Joe Morello, drums). Then after another introduction from Williams, Bennett, joined by longstanding pianist and musical director Ralph Sharon on piano, Hal Gaylor on bass, and Billy Exiner, drums, perform ‘Just in Time’, ‘Small World, ‘Make Someone Happy’, ‘Rags to Riches’, ‘One For My Baby (and One More For the Road)’ and ‘I Left My Heart in San Francisco’ . The final tracks feature the key collaboration: with Bennett joining Brubeck, Wright and Morello on ‘Lullaby Of Broadway’, ‘Chicago (That Toddlin’ Town)’, ‘That Old Black Magic’ [which has previously appeared on record], and ‘There Will Never Be Another You’. The album will be released on Monday 27 May in the UK.

Stephen Graham

Photo: Columbia/RPM/Legacy

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Tingvall trio
In Concert
Skip ****

In September last year Martin Tingvall, the leader of one of the most acclaimed and best selling young European piano jazz trios currently around, released En ny dag, his first solo piano album. Here the trio reconvene and are back with another first: their debut live album recorded on tour in the autumn.They’re still fairly unknown in the UK with only a single club appearance in London so far but I guess this will change although don’t hold your breath given the difficulties jazz promoters are facing taking risks with new bands particularly outside the capital even if Tingvall are a safe bet.

The trio, that’s Swedish pianist Martin Tingvall based like Cuban bassist Omar Rodriguez Calvo and German drummer Jürgen Spiegel in Hamburg, are a big deal in Germany winning ensemble of the year at the Echo awards and charting at number one in the German jazz charts. Their previous albums Vattensaga (2009), Norr (2008), and Skagerrak (2006) have each sold very well, and Vägen (‘The Road’) was released in the UK by their long time label Skip. All the songs on In Concert were written by Tingvall and arranged by the trio, and several of the tunes the band played at their Pizza Express Jazz Club concert last summer including ‘Mustasch’ and ‘Trolldans-Monster’ are here. From the off and certainly by ‘Nu Djävlar’ the band is in the zone, and Martin Tingvall has the ability to raise the drama at a rate of knots while he throws in little touchs of stride and funk. The big track ‘Vägen’ , the title track of the last studio album and played live in London is quite superb, an emotional tour de force, with little folk-y touches that recall Jan Johansson the patron saint of Swedish jazz piano who English piano star Kit Downes is remembering as well on his latest album for Basho. The talented Calvo (think Cachaito) makes his presence felt, for instance at the end of ‘Valsang’, and Spiegel brings life force and personality to all the tracks.

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Martin Tingvall, above left, Jürgen Spiegel, and Omar
Rodriguez Calvo

Trolldans-Monster’ takes the improvising a step further and has a great deal of impact and it’s here the band is closest to EST. But really Tingvall are quite different: naturalistic in essence, and they’re not afraid to play what they feel. If you’re still unfamiliar with Tingvall experience the sheer flow of these talented improvisers: they’re the real thing.
Released on Monday 8 April

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Murphy: a continuing inspiration

The release date is still to be confirmed but Gearbox records hopes it will be in time for what would have been Shirley Horn’s 79th birthday on 1 May. The release in question, Mark Murphy’s vinyl EP A Beautiful Friendship Remembering Shirley Horn, with tracks ‘A Beautiful Friendship’, ‘But Beautiful’, ‘Get out of Town’ and ‘Here’s To Life’ were recorded in the US as recently as November 2012 as previously reported in these pages. It’s a rare chance to hear Mark Murphy on a record at all these days and recently even though he was to have appeared at Ronnie Scott’s in London for club dates, Murphy, who’s 81, on doctor’s orders, wasn’t able to fly to make the gigs.

The only jazz singer (possibly the only person) on the planet to make Kurt Elling seem unhip, Murphy is no stranger to the UK and lived in London for a spell in the late-1960s and later in the acid jazz years the young retro clubbers took to Murphy with some fervour and he found a new young listenership. Murphy’s setting of lyrics to Oliver Nelson’s ‘Stolen Moments’ was just one point of entry for new fans, and he still retained the affection of the beats. Many think of Murphy as the only jazz singer truly on the same artistic wavelength as Jack Kerouac. Murphy’s last great album, one of the best vocal jazz albums of the 1990s, was Song for the Geese for which he was Grammy nominated, but Murphy has continued to work with younger musicians such as the driving Five Corners Quintet. On A Beautiful Friendship: Remembering Shirley Horn two of the songs, ‘But Beautiful’ and ‘Here’s To Life’ Horn recorded, apparently at a New York spot called the Au bar, and was released in 2005 with Roy Hargrove her muse, as Miles Davis once regarded Shirley Horn as his.

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ACV
Busk
Babel ***
Very much a heart-on-sleeve band ‘Degree Absolute’ the second track here exemplifies Andy Champion’s band ACV’s debut for Babel best, with ‘Dust Red’ at the end driving the point home. Rough and ready, but deliberately so, as the band swarms and separates on opening numbers they’re big softies really. On ‘Nutmeg State’ the short stabby phrases leaking out of Paul Edis’ rubbery keyboards as drummer Adrian Tilbrook conjures a Billy Cobham-like rhythm undertow have impact that Champion builds on; but ‘She Said It Ugly’ throws the ball sharply to Edis to kick about, and like ‘Degree Absolute’ this song is all about anthemic saxophone with Graeme Wilson giving it plenty of wellie guided by an in-your-face production approach that Chris Sharkey of trioVD injects. ‘Second Season’ allows the proggy McCallum-esque guitar of Mark Williams a bit of space at the beginning, but the song drags its heels and Busk does have its longueurs, feeling more like a gig (part of the point I suppose) than an album at times. ‘Giant Mice’ is the band at its proggiest with gizmo keyboards and Tilbrook hooligan-like on drums, and later Sharkey’s no-messing-about influence coming to bear on ‘What’s For Breakfast’. So, honest music-making by a band that follows its own instincts, and sees them through come what may.
Currently on release.
ACV play the Vortex on Thursday 4 April, supported by Dialogues. See Gigs

 

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There are slim pickings for jazz fans at the Glastonbury festival this year given its sheer scale but there are some notable names close enough for jazz at the biggest rock festival in the world when all attention this year will understandably be on The Rolling Stones. Closest to a jazz sensibility on the Pyramid stage is Rokia Traoré who before Glastonbury will be taking herself to Band on the Wall for a jazz club set soon. And Laura Mvula, who’s appearing at the Cheltenham Jazz Festival in May, is also heading for the Pyramid stage, while the Other Stage has only Portishead of interest, a bit tangential maybe although Jim Barr and Clive Deamer of Get the Blessing are strongly part of the Portishead sound. The West Holts stage has Lianne La Havas, like Mvula Cheltenham-bound, and also there’s a chance to hear the jazztronica sound of BadBadNotGood, and the soul jazz clubber’s delight approach of Alice Russell. Michael Kiwanuka who’s appearing at many jazz festivals on the continent this summer is on at the Park stage, while other highlights include Steve Winwood in the Acoustic tent.
Laura Mvula above

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APvr7vEBZBA

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Joshua Redman to release ballad-driven new album Walking Shadows

‘Final Hour’ from Walking Shadows

Brad Mehldau has produced the soon to be released Walking Shadows, saxophonist and composer Joshua Redman’s latest album to be released in early-May. Ballad-heavy and characterised by an orchestral ensemble with a core quartet featuring Mehldau, Larry Grenadier, and Brian Blade from Wayne Shorter’s quartet the tunes feature Redman and Mehldau originals and songs by John Mayer, Pino Palladino, Jerome Kern / Oscar Hammerstein, and Lennon and McCartney.

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Legendary guitarist to release interpretation of
John Zorn’s Tap: The Book of Angels, Vol 20

In the spirit of Pat Metheny’s groundbreaking forays into free improvised music that dates back to Song X with Ornette Coleman released in 1986 and a collaboration with Derek Bailey called The Sign Of Four a decade later, the great jazz guitarist’s label Nonesuch has united with John Zorn’s Tzadik label to release a new album called Tap: The Book of Angels, Vol 20 in late-May. John Zorn, about to embark on a major Zorn At 60 festival tour with key appearances including one at the historic Moers festival in Germany next month, has never collaborated with Metheny on a record before. The music Metheny is to release is taken from the second volume of the Masada Book known as the ‘Book of Angels’, inspired like the first volume by traditional Jewish music. Metheny and Zorn started to think about working together via email, Metheny says, after Zorn contacted him to write notes for one of his Arcana publications. “I mentioned", Metheny says via his record company, “that I had followed his Book of Angels series from the start and felt like I might be able to contribute something unique to the collection. With his enthusiastic encouragement, he gave me some suggestions as to which tunes were still unrecorded, and I picked the ones that jumped out and spoke to me. Over the next year, in between breaks from the road, I recorded them one by one in my home studio whenever I got a chance." Tracks are ‘Mastema’, ‘Albim’, ‘Tharsis’, ‘Sariel’, ‘Phanuel’, and ‘Hurmiz’. Look out for a review in Marlbank nearer release.

The cover of Tap, above

 

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Iva Bittová
Iva Bittová
ECM ****
There’s minimalism and there’s minimalism. Cast a glance in the direction of the blotchy almost opaque seascape of the artwork to Iva Bittová above, an album incidentally succinct enough to be self titled. The composition titles complete the effect: there’s just one word ‘Fragments’, and then a dozen roman numerals tacked on although they’re not so much variations as chapters in a continuing  and engrossing tale. The Czech vocalist and violinist isn’t a minimalist in the Terry Riley sense at all but hovers at the pared-down end of improv with occasional bird-like forays and the incantatory power of a prophetess at other times. Surprisingly tuneful at times, although mysteriously so the approach is defiantly unorthodox and more structured than it seems at first. The best clues you might have thought beforehand would be to look in the songs with lyrics provided by Gertrude Stein and Chris Cutler, There’s even an additional ‘fragment’ of composer Joaquin Rodrigo in here as well. But the words are as elemental and inscrutable as the seascape on the cover. Bittová manages to sound as if she’s from a desperately remote place, the instrument of a song emerging from the earth itself, yet the improvisations are never alienating. These ‘fragments’ would have been inconsequential in a lesser artist’s hands, but with Bittová enlarge before your very eyes. It’s a quality that makes this album, where less is more is paramount, so appealing.

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Symphony of the senses

Stockholm is to host the world première of EST Symphony. Tickets for the concert went on sale at the weekend in Stockholm for the concert to be held at the city’s Konserthuset on 12 June. An announcement about further concert dates in July will be made later, EST management confirms.

Distinguished Finnish pianist Iiro Rantala, formerly of the hit Finnish band Trio Töykeät, whose latest solo album My History of Jazz was released in the autumn is to perform with EST’s Dan Berglund and Magnus Öström and the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Hans Ek, with acclaimed Norwegian trumpeter Mathias Eick (Skala, The Door), Swedish saxophonist Joakim Milder, and pedal steel guitarist Johan Lindström (from Berglund’s band Tonbruket) joining. 

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Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra

Esbjörn Svensson, the charismatic and influential pianist and composer tragically died on 14 June 2008 aged just 44 as a result of a scuba diving accident in his native Sweden. In his short career he changed the face of European jazz taking it global, and has influenced a countless number of bands around the world since including Trichotomy, GoGo Penguin, Tingvall Trio, Neil Cowley Trio, and Brad Mehldau, to name just five. Svensson gained the appreciation and respect of jazz giant Pat Metheny who performed with EST at the Jazz Baltica festival in Germany and songs performed at JazzBaltica, arranged by Svensson for chamber orchestra, form the basis of the symphony with totally new arrangements for symphony by Hans Ek. Material is thought to include the beautiful ‘Serenade for the Renegade’ from the 2002-released album Strange Place for Snow; ‘Definition of a Dog’ (from Gagarin’s Point of View, a version of which also later appeared on the epic Live in Hamburg); ‘When God Created the Coffee Break’ (again from Strange Place for Snow); and ‘Pavane’ (featured on Good Morning Susie Soho).

At JazzBaltica Pat Metheny joined EST and the chamber orchestra to play ‘Behind the Yashmak’, and that concert at the core of EST Symphonic also featured ‘Believe, Beleft, Below’, and ‘Dodge the Dodo’.

Ek, born in Uppsala is best known for his work as music director of the Polar Music Prize ceremony, where he has arranged and performed with the Stockholm Royal Philharmonic Orchestra music by Pink Floyd, Peter Gabriel, Björk, and Paul Simon among the winners of the prestigious prize.  

Esbjörn Svensson became the most significant figure in Swedish jazz since Jan Johansson in the 1960s far surpassing Johansson’s reach despite the huge success of Johansson’s classic album Jazz på svenska (‘Jazz in Swedish’), which used European folk music as an ingredient for jazz improvisation, one of the first to do so. Västeras-born, Svensson harnessed the power of rock, free jazz, and electronics for the first time allying them to his own virtuoso grasp of the music of the masters of jazz piano including chiefly Thelonious Monk in the early stages of his career. Svensson’s compositional strength was firmly rooted within the co-operative spirit of the trio as the band shared writing duties and credits and thought as one. Svensson founded EST in 1993 with his childhood friend drummer Magnus Öström and bassist Dan Berglund. They together went on to become global jazz stars, releasing 11 albums during Esbjörn’s lifetime with another, Leucocyte, appearing shortly after Svensson’s death, and four years later the extraordinary 301 released in March last year. EST Symphony is a brand new day. Stephen Graham

EST top
Venue link: http://bit.ly/YVNPRL

 

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Jamming at the new jazz club in Dubai

Pizza Express has opened a new jazz club called Jazz@PizzaExpress in Dubai’s Jumeirah Lakes Towers residential district, local reports suggest. Next to the Mövenpick Hotel in the Jumeirah Lakes Towers district, there are no details of the club’s programme so far, but Time Out Dubai claims that: “In Dubai managers say they hope to replicate the London venue’s success by showcasing local talent." The picture above was run on the Undefined Declarations blog. Read more about the launch there: http://undefineddeclarations.wordpress.com/tag/jazzpizzaexpress

Photo: Undefined Declarations

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Manchester commission for 2013: ‘The Felonious Monks’

The Manchester jazz festival traditionally leaves it late to declare its programme but one thing the festival was early in declaring again this year was the latest MJF Originals commission. That’s the leading north west of England summertime jazz festival’s pioneering scheme to unlock new creative talent and pinpoint new jazz. The 2013 commission, is unusual, titled ‘The Felonious Monks’, and it’s a collaboration between Mike Hall and Deborah Rogers in an ensemble work that meshes early renaissance music and contemporary jazz, with modern and replica 16th century instruments. Tonsured bebop, no less. Crumhorns (no me, neither, except you blow it), shawms, cornamuses, cornets, sackbuts, lute, gemshorns and recorders are part of the instrumentational palette. Hall is a saxophonist, a former member of NYJO, and is a member of Echoes of Ellington; while Deborah Rogers has been closely associated with early music group Kincorth Waits and leads No Strings Attached and big band In The Pink. This year’s Manchester Jazz Festival begins on 26 July.

 

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Mario Biondi
Sun
Sony Music Italy ***1/2
This is quite a production, with a big brassy opening, lush strings, and Biondi’s deep very soulful voice. It’s very superior crooning in a soul-jazz situation with great diction and control and the voice speaks to you. Sun may well flatter to distract though as there are so many famous guests on the album, with the Incognito band in tow, quite a few songs by Bluey, and guests including Chaka Khan on Boz Scaggs’ ‘Lowdown’, Al Jarreau, and Leon Ware. The big songs with guests for me are ‘Never Stop’ featuring Omar in duo with Biondi, the higher voice contrasting with Biondi’s grizzly tones; and ‘Light to the World’ with Al Jarreau joining to duet, a still sadness in Jarreau’s voice although it’s an upbeat song. Tracks without famous people that impressed me include Biondi’s excellent vocal on ‘Come to Me’, with cadences oddly familiar (like Bacharach/David’s ‘Magic Moments’ in the bit here where the lyric goes the joy comes after). And the multi-tracked vocals on ‘What Have You Done To Me’, Bluey’s song co-written with Biondi and one Davide Florio, soar. Downsides? The Barry White moments which pop up along the way like a vocal alter ego Biondi releases some times can be a bit cheesy and intrude, but the Italian could teach some of the wannabe jazz crooners a thing or two. He’s a class act.  Stephen Graham
Mario Biondi above plays the Albert Hall with Incognito on 10 May. Sun is released on 13 May

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Top ten rated albums in March on Marlbank

1 & ALBUM OF THE MONTH Kendrick Scott and Oracle
Conviction
Concord
http://www.marlbank.net/post/46505345831/empty-your-mind

2 Aaron Diehl
The Bespoke Man’s Narrative
Mack Avenue
http://www.marlbank.net/post/44369908614/dress-to-impress

Human
Being Human

Babel
http://www.marlbank.net/post/46414879386/album-of-the-week-being-human 

4 Erin Boheme
What a Life
Heads Up
http://www.marlbank.net/post/45336635369/this-could-be-the-last-time

5
George Shearing
At Home
Jazz Knight
http://www.marlbank.net/post/45349964779/pull-up-a-chair

6 Robert Hurst
Bob: a Palindrome

Bebob Records
http://www.marlbank.net/post/45662910330/bob-hurst-branford-and-tain-enter-the-palindrome

7 Dave Douglas
Time Travel
Green Leaf Music
http://www.marlbank.net/post/44775864383/set-the-tardis-to-fly

8 Barry Altschul
The 3dom Factor
TUM
http://www.marlbank.net/post/44698150596/a-drummers-song                          

9 Patricia Barber
Smash
Concord
http://www.marlbank.net/post/44862674035/the-red-on-the-road

10 Quest
Circular Dreaming
Enja
http://www.marlbank.net/post/45411838293/seek-and-you-will-find

 

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Trish Clowes

At the city of Derry jazz and big band festival in a year that the city marks its UK city of culture status with many special festivals and events, the jazz festival in May will host a radio broadcast to be recorded by BBC Radio 3’s Jazz Line-Up show presented by pianist Julian Joseph, with a concert to take place at the Tower Hotel in Derry on Monday 6 May. Artists to take part in the broadcast are to include BBC New Generation artist saxophonist Trish Clowes who last year released And In The Night-Time She Is There, with a Derry-bound band featuring Troyka guitarist Chris Montague, bassist Calum Gourlay, drummer James Maddren, and The Impossible Gentlemen’s Gwilym Simcock on piano.

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Three albums in the can for Gwilym Simcock

Welsh-born Simcock, 32, has been busy finishing the last studio work on the latest Impossible Gentlemen album set for release later this year. “Very exciting few days,” he says on Facebook, mentioning he’s also been preparing a new orchestral CD featuring the City of London Sinfonia and Martin France of Spin Marvel. Simcock has just returned from the Bavarian artist retreat of Schloss Elmau where his previous album Good Days At Schloss Elmau for Siggi Loch’s ACT label garnered the pianist a Mercury nomination in 2011. This time he was there for a duo recording with bassist Yuri Goloubev. Gwilym Simcock pictured

www.cityofderryjazzfestival.com

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Blanchard: no borders just horizons

When Terence Blanchard appeared at Ronnie Scott’s during the London Jazz Festival he let drop in his bandstand chat that his band would be entering the studio imminently. And that Friday night on Frith Street the quintet played for the early house Brice Winston’sTime To Spare’ a sprawling multi-section epic that sure enough is included on new album Magnetic.

Now confirmed for a May release by Blue Note in the States (no UK date yet) the album has ten songs with Tuczon road warrior Winston joining the great jazz composer and trumpeter, as well as pianist Fabian Almazan, new bassist Joshua Crumbly, and drummer Kendrick Scott whose own album, the happening Oracle session Conviction, has just been released by Concord. Magnetic has the Second Great Miles Quintet bassist Ron Carter as a guest plus Ravi Coltrane, who’s also signed to Blue Note, and Blanchard’s old friend guitarist Lionel Loueke who used to be in the Quintet and whose lovely ballad ‘Benny’s Tune’ named for Lionel’s former wife is still in the band book. Tunes are ‘Magnetic’, ‘Jacob’s Ladder’,‘Don’t Run’, ‘Pet Step Sitter’s Theme Song’, ‘Hallucinations’, ‘No Borders Just Horizons’, ‘Comet’, ‘Central Focus’, ‘Another Step’, and that tune previously mentioned, ‘Time To Spare’ as closer. Blanchard is also to premiere Champion, an opera in jazz at a theatre in St Louis, more of which later in Marlbank.

Terence Blanchard above

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The New York Quartet to play the Barbican on 15 May

They’re into their second night at Birdland in New York tonight and now the Barbican in London has confirmed the UK debut of the Tomasz Stańko New York Quartet. To appear in a double bill with the Jazz FM-winning John Surman  who appeared with Stańko as far back as late-1990s album From The Green Hill the concert will mark a new phase for Stańko in terms of his UK and broader European public. Stańko’s  latest album, a double set called Wisława, is the first with an American band and the first double album of his career, also the first to be recorded in America. At 70 Stańko still connects with jazz at a deep level, almost on a level of suffering but also in the joy of his influences and the empathy of a great artist. Living in New York for large stretches of the year he is now able for the first extended period of his long career to commune with the history of the music there, but also the way it lives in city streets, the galleries, studios, and in the life of the musicians he plays with, and who he writes for. His New York quartet begins and ends with the abstractions of Generation X-er Gerald Cleaver who on Wisława plays brushes a great deal, every soft stroke like a footfall; and it’s Thomas Morgan in the slipstream to heighten the effect of this presence while David Virelles almost in an absurdist tradition waits to swoop because that’s his task, arpeggiating and making every chord inflection count. Wisława is mostly modal and the songs are sad but life affirming: think the best arthouse film you know and the music from Wisława would work beyond context.

Having performed with the late Wisława Szymborska he appreciated the poet’s simplicity and he is able to channel the laments at the heart of her poetry, again a benevolent but perceptive sort of despair at discovered ignorance rather than the unmasking of ghosts or the depiction of menace at the heart of, say, Zbigniew Herbert’s very different muse, or the horror ready to damn the world in Miłosz’s. Wisława has a simplicity in its 12 tunes, and ‘Metafizyka’ is the best piece of all. But every tune have a point even a little “bosanetta” such as ‘Oni’, an inverted dance. The first bars of Wisława amount not to a symphony but a song touched with love and sadness, or the melancholy Stańko speaks of, and that humanity that Birdland audiences this weekend and the London audience in May might well discover for themselves. Stephen Graham
www.barbican.org.uk

Metaphysical approach: Thomas Morgan, Tomasz Stańko, David Virelles and Gerald Cleaver above

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Apocalyptic saxophone carries the day

Nicolas Masson/Roberto Pianca/Emanuele Maniscalco
Third Reel
ECM ***
Beginning with a little tune that recalls the melody of ‘Nature Boy’ this Swiss Italian trio though has written all the fairly short tunes themselves with single, double or band credits and the album is a curiosity. The name of the band suggests folk you might think or ‘reel’ as tape whether audio or celluloid, but by the second track it’s more a cosmic Pharoah-esque sound that sticks with a kind of an apocalyptic feel to Masson’s keening tenor saxophone lead. Recorded in Lugano the band apparently came together from the duo of Masson and guitarist Pianca and via MySpace and jamming in Geneva honed their sound. The band reminds me a little of Partikel (although it’s guitar instead of bass) but the approach is similar if a little more abstract. It’s all a slow burn requiring some patience and to be frank a little too dour at times, especially from ‘Fasten’ onwards. That said Masson has a certain personality that makes him and this promising band worth discovering.

Emanuele Maniscalco (above left), Nicolas Masson, and Roberto Pianca

Released on Monday 1 April

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Tour notes: June Tabor, Iain Ballamy and Huw Warren

It’s becoming a default band name already so let’s just say Quercus, and leave it at that, are touring next month and, following a review of Quercus yesterday of June Tabor, Iain Ballamy, and Huw Warren’s deeply satisfying folk-jazz album in these virtual pages, here are details of the tour dates coming up. Alas and alack Basingstoke, where the album was so beautifully recorded, is not on the schedule on this tour at least but these are: Stables, Milton Keynes (14 April, www.stables.org); Phoenix, Exeter (23 April www.exeterphoenix.org.uk); St George’s, Bristol (25 April www.stgeorgesbristol.co.uk); Sage, Gateshead (27 April www.thesagegateshead.org); Warwick Arts Centre, Coventry (29 April www.warwickartscentre.co.uk); LSO St Luke’s, London (30 April www.lso.co.uk); and the Playhouse, Salisbury as part of the Salisbury International Arts Festival (31 May www.salisburyfestival.co.uk). MB

Quercus, above

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Kendrick Scott and Oracle show their class on Conviction

Opening with the prayer of St Francis as spoken word, Kendrick Scott and Oracle’s Conviction make a second unusual choice: a cover of influential Brummie outfit Broadcast’s ‘Pendulum’ (from their Haha Sound album put out a decade ago). Guitarist Mike Moreno is Loueke-like as the track builds and then saxophonist John Ellis goes into hipster overdrive, really building as Scott provides the beautiful rhythm undergrowth. The Blanchard man powers Oracle like you wouldn’t believe, different limbs playing different rhythms, the epitome of the brilliant drummer just doing what he does on strong tunes. Taylor Eigsti on Fender Rhodes responds to the lapping guitar undulations at the end and the mood is set. Not out in the UK until May the album has gone to number one in the US iTunes jazz chart just a few days after release and no wonder as word of this spread like wildfire. Alan Hampton, old Houston mate of Robert Glasper’s who performed with the keyboardist in the autumn at the Roundhouse, doesn’t really play bass any more instead he’s a decent singer/songwriter of some quality and shows what he can do by really nailing ‘Too Much’ Sufjan Stevens’ song next up on Conviction captioned as Love. Another Glasper connection and ex-Floetry sideman Derrick Hodge has produced Conviction and the album is accessible but very much a jazz head’s album as well. That’s a knack.

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Released by Concord in May in the UK

Great drums and keyboards processing on ‘Too Much’, love the scrappy industrial edge, and a guitar break to die for, and Scott opens up the time signature, a little like the way he does with Blanchard playing behind Brice Winston. Herbie’s ‘I Have a Dream’ is next with swinging bass from Joe Sanders and really classy modern jazz guitar from Moreno; the important equality track written by Scott ‘We Shall By Any Means’ with Sanders at his best on unaccompanied bass beautifully captured leading into a bass clarinet ostinato of some tenderness by Ellis. Then it’s ‘Liberty or Death’ (representing freedom), turning the volume up after a couple of minutes and a rhythm section figure you’ve got to hear with Moreno spiderwebbing up to the top of the band sound and then a multi-tracked vocal swell reminiscent of the much missed Mark Ledford.

‘Be water my friend, empty your mind’ Bruce Lee

Kendrick’s solo at the beginning of ‘Cycling Through Reality’ might bring a few smiles from Jack DeJohnette (that’s in a good way although he might joke about which Special Edition album of his he’s been listening to!), and then it’s chords all the way from Moreno and a Blanchard-esque horn entry as this expansive tune develops. It’s possibly the most technical on the album but one that is very accessible as well so it’s not just for the jazz heads. Ellis loves getting in Chris Potter-land as well when the tune passes the three-minute mark and Moreno hits the sweet spot when he joins. Derrick Hodge’s title track ‘Conviction’ (love the bass riff and tone row harmony snatches from guitar and keys); then Walter Smith III’s ballad ‘Apollo’ with Eigsti showing what he can do on bravura piano, the crackling ‘Serenity’ with Hampton’s winning vocals against bass clarinet representing Faith; Scott’s ‘Be Water’ with some spoken word from martial arts guru Bruce Lee, the album’s bizarre Eric Cantona moment, and Michiel (not as stated) Borstlap’s ‘Memory of Enchantment’, a lucid piano solo, completes this superlative album. Best thing I’ve heard this year standing tall alongside The Sirens. Conviction (*****) just leaps out of the speakers.
Stephen Graham

Oracle pictured with Derrick Hodge right

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Giovanni Guidi
City of Broken Dreams

ECM ***
There’s no sense of place other than in the title track of City of Broken Dreams and its bookending variant. And philosophically the ‘city’ like the dreams themselves does not exist. “Enrico Rava’s pianist” Guidi, with Stańko New York Quartet bassist Thomas Morgan and Portuguese drummer João Lobo dwell at least in the titles on a range of situations: determined (‘No Other Possibility’), contemplative (‘Ocean View’), fearful (‘The Forbidden Zone’) or predicated on vital relationships (‘The Impossible Divorce’, ‘The Way Some People Live’). There’s a mysterious ‘Leonie’ who is given an exquisite weightless melody that lifts the album via Morgan’s traction and Guidi’s harmonic touch to the heights as well. Guidi is a child of the 1980s, little known until now beyond his connection to Rava, but this Bley-esque debut as a leader for ECM is really very different to what you’ll hear on a Rava record. Lovely music throughout from a highly promising new leader, and it’s beautifully played and cultured although lacking a certain bite at times even if Morgan manages to add a master improviser’s edge. All the compositions are Guidi’s and to pinpoint another ‘The Forbidden Zone’ exhibits the trio’s ability to conjure highly contrasting noir that depict the ruins of emotion rather than metropolitan rubble. Stephen Graham

Giovanni Guidi above photo Paolo Soriani / ECM

 

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First Keith Jarrett standards trio album in a decade

ECM has confirmed the release of Somewhere, the long rumoured Keith Jarrett Standards trio album. Recorded in Lucerne in July 2009 at KKL Luzern, a Jean Nouvel-designed concert hall with wondrous acoustics the work of famed acoustician Russell Johnson part of a complex that includes a modern art gallery, smaller hall, and restaurants overlooking Lake Lucerne in Switzerland.

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The first standards trio release in a decade (the last was Up For It recorded outdoors in the south of France), no track listings are available yet but there is some speculation that the set contains a long version of ‘Somewhere’ and ‘Tonight’ from West Side Story. It’s released on 6 May. Stephen Graham

 

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The view from KKL in Lucerne top; Jack DeJohnette, Keith Jarrett and Gary Peacock pictured middle; and inside the hall above.
Photos: Olivier Bruchez; and Standards trio photo: ECM

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Not since Lammas has jazz and folk combined so effectively

June Tabor/Iain Ballamy/Huw Warren
Quercus
ECM ****
Straddling folk and, by association and intent, jazz, Quercus, the trio of leading folk singer June Tabor, saxophonist Iain Ballamy also of the band Food, and pianist Huw Warren (who has performed with Tabor for an astonishing 25 years) these 11 songs have taken some time to be released, seven years since they were recorded in Basingstoke on a fabled piano in the town’s Anvil venue. But it’s more than worth the wait and it’s Warren’s interplay with the full expressive sound of Tabor’s voice (like Norma Waterson’s slightly, but darker than Christine Tobin’s) that counts. Iain Ballamy here and in Food recently has been on the form of his life, and his solo for instance on ‘Near But Far Away’ distils a life time’s work on ballads. At the end ‘All I Ask of You’ is a reminder of the moving version of the song on Balloon Man Ballamy’s first big breakthrough in the late-1980s. Texts of the songs draw on disparate sources including Robert Burns, A. E .Housman and Shakespeare and highlights include the lovely ‘Who Wants the Evening Rose’ where the honesty of Tabor’s voice momentarily recalling the late Kirsty MacColl, is truest. Ballamy here, oak-sturdy as the genus the band itself takes its name from, intertwines his improvisations with Warren’s superbly empathetic accompaniment so appropriately. Not since Lammas, has a folk-jazz project worked as joyously as here. Stephen Graham

Released on Monday 1 April

Quercus pictured   

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Human
Being Human
Babel **** RECOMMENDED
This is the debut release of Human, drummer and composer Stephen Davis’ new quartet. The Human sound is coloured by the violin of the maverick Dylan Bates, notable for his work with Billly Jenkins and Waiting For Dwarfs and it’s his best work to date. Human also features the talismanic presence of pianist Alexander Hawkins, and the electronicist, trumpeter Alex Bonney. ‘Little Particles’ finds Bonney In a Silent Way state of mind amid the complementary African-sounding piano and drums, with Bates resembling Leroy Jenkins in his pomp with that jagged Beckenham-derived individuality bolted on his brother Django also possesses. Hawkins is a haunting presence throughout. ‘I Am Planet’ has a rustling unsettled feel to it, with Hawkins’ three-note figure after the three-minute marking the warts-and-all groove that opens up for Davis to then move deep into multi-directional territory. ‘Cartagena’ is very different, as the clash of the drummer’s snare pumps the band up. An eloquent expression, there’s plenty of originality on Being Human. MB

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With his band the Orient House Ensemble the band the saxophonist has led and toured hard for a dozen years, Gilad Atzmon is to celebrate his 50th birthday with two nights at the progressive Vortex club in east London on 14-15 June.

Collecting controversy effortlessly, his latest album Songs of the Metropolis recorded at the end of September and beginning of October last year is not though controversial in the slightest, with a theme based around the “sound of the city”, with tracks named after places: Paris, the opener, say. Or Tel Aviv, Buenos Aires, and so on, with one odd exception: the seaside town of Scarborough, “as opposed to London” as Atzmon’s gloss in the notes has it.

Atzmon says: “Now our planet weeps. Beauty is perhaps the last true form of spiritual resistance. The song is there to counter detachment and alienation.” Later in the album booklet there’s a quotation from the David Garrioch 2003 book Sounds of the City that contrasts how the sounds in a city were heard in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries to the way they are heard today. “The evolution of this information system reflects changes in social and political organization and in attitudes towards time and urban space,” Garrioch writes. An “auditory community” is how he also terms it. Atzmon’s ballads-driven album taps into a line of jazz ballad-making that goes way back to at least Sidney Bechet in terms of the saxophone. The quartet on this World Village release, Atzmon with pianist Frank Harrison, bassist Yaron Stavi, and drummer Eddie Hick, meld well to the expressive Atzmon playing style, which for me works best in his take on the traditional ‘Scarborough Fair’ melody (‘Scarborough’), and on the lovely ‘Vienna’. This album is a different view of the city, as urban soundscapes are usually thrusting affairs, radically different in flavour, and a lot grittier and volatile as Atzmon himself usually is. One of Atzmon’s best, alongside Exile and his work with the great Robert Wyatt, particularly For The Ghosts Within. These Vortex appearances coming immediately after the release of such a fine album should be very special indeed. Stephen Graham
Advance tickets from www.vortexjazz.co.uk

The Orient House Ensemble pictured with Eddie Hick, above left, Yaron Stavi, Frank Harrison, and Gilad Atzmon

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Chelsea club to host festival from 22 May-2 June

Philadelphia jazz legend Pat Martino is to open the 606 club’s 25th anniversary festival in May with the guitarist making his first ever appearance in the Chelsea basement club. Originally located on the King’s Road, bandleader and flautist Stevie Rubie’s classic jazz club has consistently punched above its weight now long established on Lots Road, near the old Lots Road power station and in itself generating enough jazz power to keep the street swinging with neighbourhood, national, and international appeal as a jazz venue.

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The festival begins on Wednesday 22 May with Pat Martino opening the 606 25 Fest, and while the complete line-up is still to be confirmed artists taking part in the 606 festival, which runs until 2 June, with up to four bands playing each night, are so far: Dan Reinstein, Dill Katz, Tony Kofi (Thursday 23 May); Lillian Boutte, Ian Shaw, Jacqui Dankworth (Friday 24 May); Mornington Lockett, Tim Whitehead, Nigel Hitchcock (Saturday 25 May); 606 Club Big Band (Sunday 26 May lunchtime); Hamish Stuart, Tony O’Malley (Sunday 26 May evening); 606 club band past and present, Jim Mullen, Ronnie Scott All-Stars (Monday 27 May); Adam Glasser with Robin Aspland, Tony Remy, Steve Watts and Frank Tontoh, John Critchinson/Dave Ciff, Derek Nash (Tuesday 28 May); Gwilym Simcock, John Parricelli / Mark Lockheart, Iain Ballamy (Wednesday 29 May); Jack Wilkins/Peter Rubie, Dave O’Higgins, Clark Tracey (Thursday 30 May), Paul Carmichael, Imaani, Stacey Brothers (Friday 31 May); Julian Joseph, Peter King, Bobby Wellins (Saturday 1 June), Christine Tobin (lunchtime, Sunday 2 June), Liane Carroll, Tommy Blaize Band, and Samara (Sunday 2 June). MB

Pat Martino top is opening the 606 25 Fest. Club owner Steve Rubie pictured in action above with his new band Skydive on flute

  

Birthday shows this week at New York club the Jazz Standard and a new quintet album Time Travel swings hard

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Dave Douglas turned 50 at the weekend and what better way than to celebrate the trumpeter’s birthday than a run of shows at a top New York jazz club and the release of a new CD Time Travel?

So where do you time travel to? Let’s think. Fifty Second Street in its heyday or Kansas City when Charlie Parker was in Jay McShann’s band. How about the Vanguard in 1961 listening to John Coltrane on the cusp or Bill Evans on a Sunday night? Or do you wish to, instead, flip a switch to ‘divert’, and shuttle forward? Now there’s a thought.

Time Travel is about hard bop swing essentially. You’ll know the sound if you’re in a jazz club and a tune such as the opener here ‘Bridge to Nowhere’ plays, at least the section before Matt Mitchell’s piano solo.

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“I was really interested in what David Toomey wrote in his book The New Time Travelers. How the concept of time travel has been around a long time, and how it is evident in the way we think and the way we create: backwards, forwards, all directions at once, beyond the speed of light, rearranging our understanding of cause and effect.” 
- Dave Douglas

In terms of Douglas’ output, think The Infinite a bit, but there’s no Fender Rhodes. Or the band with Donny McCaslin, the saxophonist who will appear at the Cheltenham Jazz Festival next month inside the quintet for the exclusive show on 4 May. Linda Oh on bass reminds me a little of Ben Williams’ style when Williams was with Terence Blanchard, and this quintet compares strongly to Blanchard’s latest aggregation, although the way the News Orleansian leaves space for Brice Winston is different to Douglas’ approach to harmonising with Irabagon. Both approaches share that salt; and swagger. Time Travel is almost the same band as last year’s acclaimed Be Still but it’s without a singer, although vocalist Heather Masse (not Aoife O’Donovan who’s on Be Still), will join the quintet in Cheltenham with quintet changes as well as saxophone applying also to drums.

‘Law of Historical Memory’ on Time Travel has a superbly ominous atmosphere courtesy of Mitchell, and then some admirably sour horn lines accentuated by drummer Rudy Royston that allow plenty of deliberately uneasy modulating for mood purposes. ‘Beware of Doug’ opens like something out of the Treme soundtrack, while ‘Little Feet’ is where Douglas can ‘speak’ to us listeners with that personal sound of his. ‘Garden State’ referring to New Jersey has a Sopranos-like jauntiness. Finally, the album to be released by Greenleaf in April flutters to a halt with ‘The Pigeon and the Pie’, and in these 10 minutes Douglas, who turned 50 on Sunday, traces his influences back to Kenny Wheeler and beyond, but the direction is also forward. Set the tardis to fly. Stephen Graham  

Dave Douglas, above

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Soweto Kinch, Take Five Europe, and Rich Tailors are Paris-bound next month

Soweto Kinch will be performing music from The Legend of Mike Smith at next month’s Banlieues Bleues festival in Paris, and at la Dynamo situated right in the heart of the Quatre-Chemins quartier in Pantin, there’s a Take Five Europe presentation featuring new music developed and performed by a group of leading new European jazz artists performing under its banner. Trumpeter Airelle Besson, saxophonist Guillaume Perret, clarinettist Arun Ghosh, trumpeter Piotr Damasiewicz, reeds player David Kweksilber, guitarist Chris Sharkey, pianist Marcin Masecki piano, bassist Per Zanussi and drummer Marcos Baggiani will perform at the concert in a double bill with the Rich Tailors, the formidable Anglo-French collaboration formed of members of Blink and the Mediums with Robin Fincker, Daniel Erdmann, Vincent Courtois, Alcyona Mick, and Paul Clarvis. More on Banlieues Bleues in festival listings. MB
Rich Tailors, above

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With a UK release now confirmed for May although it’s released in the States this week Kendrick Scott and his band Oracle’s album Conviction, the drummer’s 11-track debut for Concord, follows on from the huge promise shown by The Source, Scott’s debut as a leader, released six years ago. But just in the autumn at Ronnie Scott’s club in London Scott, no stranger to homegrown audiences, was on storming form as the band shot into Eddie Cleanhead Vinson’s ‘Four’ with some fleetness of foot just days after President Obama was re-elected, the choice of tune title appropriate. Scott was Blakey-fast and driving hard, alongside young bass sensation Joshua “Smiler” Crumbly who himself was moving like a young Jimmy Blanton to his side. “Stoked” as he had put it before the gig and clearly up for it Scott displayed great mallet touch as the set developed, and he found the sweet part of the cymbal time and again.

Tracks on Conviction are Broadcast’s ‘Pendulum’; Sufjan Stevens’ ‘Too Much’ with a vocal by Alan Hampton who Glasper fans would have witnessed live guesting at the iTunes fest last year; Herbie Hancock’s ‘I Have a Dream’; solo bass track ‘We Shall By Any Means’; ‘Liberty or Death’; ‘Cycling Through Reality’; ‘Conviction’; ‘Apollo’; ‘Serenity’; ‘Be Water’ with a unusal monologue by that well known jazzer, martial arts master Bruce Lee; and solo piano piece ‘Memory of Enchantment’.

Scott, best known for his work in Terence Blanchard’s band, is joined in Oracle by a mostly new line-up with saxophonist and bass clarinettist John Ellis, guitarist Mike Moreno (the only band member here featured on The Source), hotshot pianist the still developing Taylor Eigsti, and bassist Joe Sanders, with Alan Hampton on two tracks in all. Co-produced by The Experiment’s Derrick Hodge, expected himself to debut for Blue Note records later this year, Hodge also wrote the title track ‘Conviction’. Scott, who’s 32 and comes from Houston where he attended the famed High School for the Performing and Visual Arts where both Robert Glasper and Jason Moran studied, and later Berklee in Boston, the drummer appeared on Terence Blanchard’s albums A Tale of God’s Will, and Flow, on which Scott’s tune ‘The Source’ features Herbie Hancock, who picked up a Grammy nomination for his solo. The song then gave its name to Scott’s own first album as a leader. New York-based for approaching a decade Scott besides Blanchard has also toured heavily with Herbie, John Scofield, and Wayne Shorter, as well as Pat Metheny and Christian McBride. Look out for an early review of Conviction in these pages soon. MB

Kendrick Scott above

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Band on the Wall has confirmed on its website that Rokia Traoré is to play the Manchester club on 20 May hot on the heels of the release of the Malian singer/songwriter/guitarist’s latest album Beautiful Africa. It’s a coup for the Swan Street club as Traoré’s appearance in the city marks a return to heartland jazz clubs in the UK by the musician who has in the last year galvanised support among artists since Islamic militants threatened artistic and cultural freedoms in her home country following a bloody uprising. Beautiful Africa released in April features drummer Seb Rochford, in action at the weekend with the touring Ellington in Anticipation band in Belfast, in a session recorded in Bristol by PJ Harvey producer John Parish. Traoré sings in French, Bambara and English and plays guitar on an album comprising nine songs with the singer also joined by Mamah Diabaté on ngoni; Fatim Kouyaté and Bintou Soumbounou, backing vocals; Nicolaï Munch Hansen, bass; producer John Parish, on additional guitar; Stefano Pilia, guitar; and Jason Singh, human beatbox. Beautiful Africa is Traoré’s first album since Tchamantché in 2009. MB 
www.bandonthewall.org

Rokia Traoré, above