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Critically acclaimed singer Brigitte Beraha, best known for her work with the band Babelfish, and Parliamentary Jazz Award-winning pianist John Turville, after touring his trio album Conception in the autumn, are to release a new duo album called Red Skies this month. Recorded in Italy at Udine’s ArteSuono studio, their standards-dominated album, which features veteran saxophonist Bobby Wellins on bookending tracks, numbers a dozen tracks opening with ‘Dindi’ then ‘My One and Only Love’ ‘Les feuilles mortes’, Chico Buarque’s ‘Beatriz’ sung in Portuguese, ‘This Heart of Mine’, sole Beraha original ‘Elephant on Wheels’, ‘Desafinado’, ‘It Might As Well Be Spring’, ‘Night Game’, ‘Moon and Sand’, ‘They Can’t Take That Away From Me’, and ‘A Time For Love’. They play Pizza Express Jazz Club on 17 February, the eve of the album’s release, that’s the Soho club where Turville recently peformed to launch the Shearing Hour in January. Released on CD by the new E17 Jazz Records (E17 a reference to the London postcode for Walthamstow where Turville and Italian-born Beraha are part of a burgeoning local jazz scene), and for download by Sussex-based Splashpoint, the pair will be joined at the Pizza Express by special guest Scottish saxophone legend Bobby Wellins, famed for his work alongside Stan Tracey on 1960s classic Under Milk Wood. SG

Brigitte Beraha above can also be heard on the recently released Hullabaloo by Dave Manington’s Riff Raff: http://marlbank.tumblr.com/post/38619403307/1678

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It’s risky, surely, although hardly an outlandish move, starting a modern mainstream-styled jazz record with ‘[I Can’t Get No] Satisfaction’? The Rolling Stones classic is taken at quite a lick on the Paolo Fresu Devil Quartet’s new album Desertico (*** Bonsaï Music/Tŭk Music), and by the time it gets towards the big finish guitarist Bebo Ferra has run through the changes to quote from A Love Supreme along the way before handing over for the band to return to the main theme. Sardinian Fresu, one of Italy’s best known jazz musicians, has immaculate technique as a trumpeter and flugel player, and an easy improvisational flair. He’s a compelling perfomer who compares to Guy Barker or Roy Hargrove stylistically and like both Barker and Hargrove has a fine track record as both a bandleader and recording artist. This album feels like a departure with subtle multi-tracked horns and effects, although it does not rock the boat stylistically. I’m not sure if the band lives up to its ‘devilish’ moniker although you’ll exude some sympathy for the little horned one on the album set piece, bassist Paolino Dalla Porta’s ambivalently guitar-driven ‘Suite for Devil’, the seventh track. There are pretty tunes aplenty, some written by Fresu (the ‘Medley’ a clear winner) and a standard routinely delivered in ‘Blame it on my Youth’. The band is responsive, the lovely production a little too glossy perhaps, but the album powered empathetically by drummer Stefano Bagnoli ultimately provides plenty of satisfaction to be going on with. SG

Desertico is out now.  Paolo Fresu above is touring with the Scottish National Jazz Orchestra this month performing a Miles Davis-related programme with concerts at Caird Hall, Dundee on 21 February; Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh, 22 Feb; Royal Conservatoire, Glasgow, 23 Feb; and Macrobert, Stirling, 24 Feb

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Continuous Beat by the Rez Abbasi Trio is a breath of fresh air but may take some people by surprise. You can’t really call it jazz-rock (fusion, even) although the sound of the trio led by 47-year-old guitarist Abbasi, who was born in Pakistan and raised in Los Angeles, with double bassist John Hébert and drummer Satoshi Takeishi, comes close to the general soundscape. The amplification on Abbasi’s guitar is a clue (it’s not as loud as a lot of fusion records, and there’s solo acoustic guitar at the end), and the drums aren’t as frenetic. Recorded last May in Brooklyn most of the songs are Abbasi’s, but Jarrett fans (you may dear reader even be one) will head to the trio’s version of ‘The Cure’ where the opening does sound like Indo-fusion (and Tirtha’s Prasanna even slightly) and there’s some great build from Hébert decanting the melody at just the right point. The Gary Peacock tune ‘Major Major’ is tackled differently: opening with drums, it feels very loose and that’s a word I’d use admiringly of this trio. Unlike the strictures of the prevailing maths jazz trend Continuous Beat (Enja, ***1/2) is always hurdling barlines and time signatures or hinting at their imminent dismantling. Continuous Beat is worth seeking out, and while Abbasi deserves to be better known, albums such as this add to the process and positive word-of-mouth he’s picked up in recent years.
Stephen Graham

The Rez Abbasi Trio above. Available in the UK as an import

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There can’t be that many record labels originally hailing from Huddersfield in west Yorkshire, and certainly not many as quietly inventive as Jellymould. The tiny indie, founded just seven years ago by Dominic Sales and Phil Gregory and home to fine Austrian guitarist Hannes Riepler who’s now hosting the new Sunday night jam at the Vortex, is next month preparing to release the second album by the band Aquarium. Places, now set for an 11 March release, is a quartet led by pianist Sam Leak above who has also written all the music on the album. It follows on from a 2011 self-titled debut that impressed Jazz FM’s Helen Mayhew who commented at the time: “Sam Leak is one of the brightest young stars in the jazz piano galaxy.” Going on to organise jam sessions at under-the-radar Greenwich jazz spot Oliver’s, Leak on Places is joined on most of the nine tracks by the band of reeds player James Allsopp, best known for his work in his band Golden Age of Steam and before that Fraud; Calum Gourlay (member of Kit Downes’ trio); and Troyka drummer Joshua Blackmore, the prog jazz outfit that features Downes on organ and was nominated for a Jazz FM award recently. The spiritual ‘Marrakech’ is one of the highlights of the album, with Allsopp reaching a Charles Lloyd-like level of intensity in the arc of his improvisation, while Leak has a quietly captivating essentially modally-based playing style throughout the album. Aquarium are touring soon and on the eve of the album launch play Pizza Express Jazz Club in London on 10 March, followed by dates including Seven Arts, Leeds (7 April); Spotted Dog, Birmingham (9 April); Dempsey’s, Cardiff (10 April); The Geldart, Cambridge (24 April); Lescar Hotel, Sheffield (1 May); and Vortex, London (30 May). SG

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Piano great Ahmad Jamal brought the inaugural Jazz FM Awards to an exultant close last night at the grade one listed former church One Marylebone in central London with a brief set featuring ‘Blue Moon’, on which he was joined by singer Jamie Cullum who added his distinctive vocals to the standard. Jamal had been presented with a lifetime achievement award at the awards and performed with his band of Reginald Veal on bass, Herlin Riley, drums, and Manolo Badrena, percussion. The intention of the Jazz FM Awards, sponsored by US audio firm Klipsch, the organisers said ahead of the event, was to “recognise and commend those who have made exceptional contributions to the jazz industry during the preceding twelve months.” The chief executive of Jazz FM Richard Wheatly spoke at the beginning of the event, held in front of an invited dining audience seated at large round tables. Hosted wittily by singer Ian Shaw, a house trio with pianist Ross Stanley, bassist Mick Hutton and drummer Chris Higginbottom, performed in the early part of the evening.

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And the winners were: UK Jazz artist of the year (public vote) Neil Cowley Trio; Gold Award for Outstanding Contribution to Jazz Ramsey Lewis; International Jazz Artist of the Year Kurt Elling; UK Instrumentalist of the Year Nathaniel Facey; UK Live Shows of the Year Gregory Porter; UK Vocalist of the Year Carleen Anderson; Cutting Edge Award for Jazz Innovation Robert Glasper; Best Jazz Media Jazzwise; Best UK Jazz Venue Ronnie Scott’s; Best UK Newcomer Beats & Pieces Big Band; Album of the Year Saltash Bells by John Surman; and Lifetime Achievement Award Ahmad Jamal. Performers on the night included the London Youth Gospel Choir during the reception, Cerys Matthews, Ramsey Lewis, Carleen Anderson singing her trademark gospel tinged version of ‘Don’t Look Back in anger’, Ian Shaw, Nathaniel Facey, and of course, Ahmad Jamal. Presenters of the awards included Jazz FM’s Helen Mayhew and David Freeman, Courtney Pine CBE, Jamie Cullum, and Suggs.
Stephen Graham

 

 

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One Saturday night, in what could have been described but wasn’t quite, as the Indian summer of 2010, there wasn’t much of a Waterloo sunset to gaze on. But that night Jay Phelps, who on Monday night you’ll see on television in Stephen Poliakoff’s Dancing on the Edge as a member of the fictional Louis Lester band, was playing, as himself, a routinely relaxed but accomplished gig at the plush Waterloo Brasserie near the Old Vic. He was about to bring out his debut album Jay Walkin’ back then and in his band as “people so busy”, to echo The Kinks song, could be seen through the windows of the brasserie walking up to the Old Vic’s foyer for the evening performance of Noel Coward’s Design For Living, Phelps had Empirical’s Shaney Forbes on drums, and rising star Tim Thornton on double bass, plus the fine under-the-radar Pat Martino-influenced Kevin Glasgow here on guitar. Thornton often plays, just as Jay does, at Ronnie Scott’s regularly and last year quietly brought out a new album called New Kid which deserved more show at the time, for sure, featuring as it did some sophisticated playing and a fine cast of soulful, mainstream, and bop-into-hard bop players including Dave O’Higgins, Grant Windsor, and Dave Hamblett. The time for Thornton and New Kid has come, though, as next month Thornton is appearing with his fine quartet on a Jazz Services backed 14-date national tour beginning at Dempsey’s in Cardiff on 12 February, and concluding on 26 April at Marigolds Jazz Club in Harlow. With a sound that recalls the succulent tone of Paul Chambers, and the more recent work of bass behemoth Christian McBride, and as an alert accompanist with a listenable way about him, Thornton is the real thing. Catch up with him wherever you are. Stephen Graham

Full tour details are at http://www.timthorntonbass.com

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I’ve loved Tomasz Stańko’s music since the first time I heard him play, back in the early-1990s. And for once it was hearing the music live before listening to any of the records. That dramatically changes your perception of an artist, doesn’t it? Substantially more than even seeing a video. Actually seeing a video, despite the curiosity value, is pretty worthless unless it’s a fully blown artistic interpretation of the music, and sadly that doesn’t happen very often.

You go away with so much more information by seeing someone live, how the artist moves and interacts; how they carry themselves; all the non-verbal communicative signs; the way they speak if they speak. It’s still only a small part of the live experience. Stańko has assembled a new band called the New York Quartet for his latest studio album Wisława (**** RECOMMENDED), a double album to be released by ECM on Monday.

There are no UK dates for him so far, but he and the quartet, a band as skilled and intuitive as Stańko’s quartet with the Marcin Wasilewski trio, are appearing at the significant ECM cultural archaeology exhibition next month in Munich, and he will play Warsaw soon again before touring in Poland in May. Stańko’s band is Reflex pianist David Virelles, also playing prepared piano and celeste on Chris Potter’s new album The Sirens; Californian bassist Thomas Morgan now living in Harlem; and the drummer the avant garde cognoscenti adore, the Brooklyn-based drummer Gerald Cleaver who played a great set at the Vortex just last year with Lotte Anker and Craig Taborn.

Recorded in June not long after a brief tour in Europe the theme of the album ties in with the poetry of the great Wisława Szymborska, hence its title: Wisława. Stańko performed with the Nobel laureate late in her life, and a number of the album’s compositions are inspired directly by her work. And they are sublime, particularly the title track ballad and ‘Mikrokosmos’. Stańko can stop you dead in your tracks with the honesty and emotion of his playing, the blues connotation, and the sheer abstraction of it all. Wisława is this and much more, his best album since Leosia and a potent reminder of the artistry of the man. SG

 

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With the recent London A Cappella Festival curated by the Swingle Singers featuring acts from around the world including The Magnets, Rajaton, and The King’s Singers, and the enduring appeal of TV series Glee, a cappella has never been more popular in the mainstream. Although the appeal of unaccompanied close harmony singing is pan-genre, with pop and rock, the light classics or even contemporary classical music equally important in terms of repertoire as well as carefully introduced original material, one of the festival’s newer acts this year was six-part a cappella group Vive who are more deeply rooted in jazz than most, and make a point of it, seeing themselves as “re-imagining the close-harmony jazz/spiritual/a cappella sound.”

Vive’s singers include Emily Dankworth, the daughter of leading jazz bassist Alec Dankworth, and was founded by James Rose a year ago. They’re joined by Sam Robson, Ben Cox, Martynas Vilpisauskas and Lewis Daniel. Vive Album released earlier this month was funded via crowdsourced backing on Kickstarter, with money going towards a mixing desk and microphones. The album’s six tracks include an expert take on Leonard Bernstein’s ‘Somewhere’, while a version of Lighthouse Family’s ‘High’ has a suitably vivacious feel. Vive has an overriding jazz pop sensibility strongly hinted at in the original arrangements here, and new material that James Rose and Sam Robson have written. SG 

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The great saxophonist Charles Lloyd turns 75 on 15 March, and to mark this significant day his label ECM is releasing a new duo album called Hagar’s Song on 18 February, with Lloyd joined by pianist Jason Moran, the award winning pianist who is also a member of the acclaimed Charles Lloyd Quartet.

Hagar’s Song features favourites of Lloyd’s, with Billy Strayhorn tune ‘Pretty Girl’ (also known as ‘Star-Crossed Lovers’), ‘Mood Indigo’, and Gershwin’s ‘Bess You Is My Woman Now’ among the material included for the duo treatment.

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Lloyd in the 1970s worked extensively with the Beach Boys, and Brian Wilson’s classic, ‘God Only Knows’, is also featured on Hagar’s Song as is a title suite dedicated to Lloyd’s great-great-grandmother who was sold to a Tennessee slave owner when she was just 10 years old, and whose story has greatly affected Lloyd so inspiring the suite. Well before Charles Lloyd returns to the London stage for a Barbican concert with his quartet (joined by guest singer Maria Farantouri) on 28 April, and just three days after his 75th, ECM is also to release a major boxed set of Lloyd’s first five albums for the label: Fish Out of Water, Notes From Big Sur, The Call, All My Relations, and Canto recorded between 1989 and the end of 1996 at the Rainbow studio in Oslo.

Stephen Graham

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Stefano Battaglia Trio
Songways
ECM ****
Still one of the least known ECM pianists although that began to change with The River of Anyder, Milan-born Battaglia is joined here once again by Sassari-born double bassist Salvatore Maiore, and drummer Roberto Dani, the youngest member of the trio who has performed with Norma Winstone among others. Battaglia on this his fifth album as a leader for the label manages to merge a deep contemplative playing style with a sparkling joyous side to his playing, say on a track such as ‘Babel Hymn’ where to place Battaglia it’s like the coming together of Keith Jarrett and Danilo Pérez’s combined playing styles. Recorded last April it’s an album of songs, chants, and dances with Battaglia attempting to bridge what he calls “archaic modal pre-tonal chant and dances, pure tonal songs and hymns and abstract texture.” I’m not quite sure hearing this album where these technical distinctions lie as it’s a record that does not hesitate to exhibit an emotional response throughout, again like Jarrett particularly on the more chant-like tunes. The most significant of his compositions (and this is a significant album, more profound than its predecessor) is the long ‘Euphonia Elegy’ full of big dramatic statements that do not seem at all overblown. With references in song titles to Homer, Jonathan Swift, Italo Calvino (the title track), Charles Fourier, Adalbert Stifter, Edgar Allan Poe, the surrealism of Renée Daumal, and Alfred Kubin, not forgetting the bible, that’s quite an extensive reading list to be going on with as inspirations of a suitably engrossing record. The trio has reached a tipping point in terms of group empathy, and on a more experimental track such as the opening of ‘Perla’ both Maiore and Dani show uncanny poise. SG
Just released

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The Jazz Warriors have announced more details of regular Sunday gigs at Hoxton jazz club Charlie Wright’s. Following the first gigs in January the first Sunday of the month dubbed Draw2Tunes sees leading musicians such as Julian Joseph, Byron Wallen, Django Bates, and Christine Tobin DJ-ing while second Sundays in the series will introduce a Voice First Instrument vocal workshop, gig and club afternoon-into-evening session with Cleveland Watkiss and Chantelle Nandi Masuku joined by guest vocalists. The third Sunday of the month at Charlie’s (above) on Pitfield Street is the Duke Joint DJ night with Cleveland Watkiss and Orphy Robinson spinning some tunes, while the fourth Sunday has vibes star Orphy back plus trumpeter Claude Deppa for a live free jazz improv session plus DJ Paul Bradshaw at the decks. SG

More at http://thejazzwarriors.com

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So who will be the toast of the first ever Jazz FM awards on Thursday? Well, of course it’s not the winning but the taking part that counts, or at least that’s what the lucky losers might well say. Beyond the results it’s a much needed opportunity to boost the profile of the vibrant UK jazz scene with a major awards, the first new initiative of a high impact nature such as this since the BBC Jazz Awards were cancelled.

We do know already that Ramsey Lewis will be presented with a gold award for outstanding contribution to jazz, while Ahmad Jamal will pick up the lifetime achievement award before bringing the evening to a close with a special performance in central London venue One Marylebone, where the awards are taking place. There’s a public vote (now closed) for UK jazz artist of the year, so presumably this will go to the artist who can draw on the biggest fan base, particularly the online massive, and with various fan sites and a big radio audience, I would guess Jamie Cullum should pick up the public seal of appreciation with some ease. International jazz artist is a trickier call, but a very popular and appropriate winner would be Sonny Rollins whose appearance at the London Jazz Festival in recent years has underlined the stature of a saxophonist who for many has always been primus inter pares.

Cutting Edge is also tough to predict, and Django Bates would be a popular choice as too would Robert Glasper, while Troyka, who have spearheaded the nascent prog jazz movement since the band’s inception, would be a major boost. With the resurgence in jazz vocals and the sheer joy he’s brought to the UK jazz scene in recent years I really hope Gregory Porter wins in the best album category for Be Good, and it would be fitting if Jazzwise, who have been behind the singer from the start, wins in the jazz media category.

Best UK Newcomer should go to everyone’s favourite Mancunian big band Beats & Pieces, although Roller Trio fresh from an award winning 2012 are also in with a strong shout. Will host for the evening Ian Shaw scoop vocalist of the year? Well, he’s got an excellent chance especially since 2012 saw the release of one of his finest albums in an often distinguished career, the Fran Landesman tribute album A Ghost In Every Bar. Instrumentalist of the year is almost impossible to call and all three nominees, Nathaniel Facey, Ivo Neame, and Phil Robson, are in with a decent chance. I’d like the constantly inventive Nathaniel Facey to win it although I was deeply impressed by Neame’s octet album Yatra last year as well, and Phil Robson is a guitarist, composer and bandleader of some clout.

Live shows of the year? Well it could be Gregory Porter triumphing again for his much talked about club shows at Pizza Express Jazz Club, but surprise nominee PB Underground with their high octane Tower of Power-like energy might be a surprise winner, while no one is going to rule out the consistently excellent Phronesis. Jazz venue of the year is a hard call. It’s a pity that the Vortex wasn’t among the nominations, especially with lively outdoor events adding to the mix at the Dalston club this year. But for sheer high profile class this accolade must surely go to Ronnie Scott’s. Don’t rule out the north’s premier jazz club Band on the Wall though.
Stephen Graham

More on the awards at www.jazzfmawards.com

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Saxophonist, clarinettist, and composer Gilad Atzmon collects controversy effortlessly, yet Songs of the Metropolis (World Village) recorded at the end of September and beginning of October last year is not controversial in the slightest, with a theme based around the “sound of the city”, with tracks named after places: Paris, the opener, say. Or Tel Aviv, Buenos Aires, and so on, with one odd exception: the seaside town of Scarborough, “as opposed to London” as Atzmon’s gloss in the notes has it. With text translated into French as well, as World Village is a French label, Atzmon says: “Now our planet weeps. Beauty is perhaps the last true form of spiritual resistance. The song is there to counter detachment and alienation.” Later in the album booklet there’s a quotation from the David Garrioch 2003 book Sounds of the City that contrasts how the sounds in a city were heard in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries to the way they are heard today. “The evolution of this information system reflects changes in social and political organization and in attitudes towards time and urban space,” Garrioch writes. An “auditory community” is how he also terms it. Atzmon’s ballads-driven album does tap into a line of jazz ballad-making that goes way back to at least Sidney Bechet in terms of the saxophone. The quartet, Atzmon with pianist Frank Harrison, bassist Yaron Stavi, and drummer Eddie Hick, meld well to the expressive Atzmon playing style, which for me works best in his take on the traditional ‘Scarborough Fair’ melody (‘Scarborough’), and on the lovely ‘Vienna’. This album is a different view of the city, as urban soundscapes are usually thrusting affairs, radically different in flavour, and a lot grittier and volatile as Atzmon himself usually is. One of Atzmon’s best, alongside Exile and his work with Robert Wyatt, particularly For The Ghosts Within. SG

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Stephan Micus
Panagia
ECM ***1/2
With settings of Byzantine Greek prayers Stephan Micus returns for his twentieth album for ECM with Panagia, an astonishing tally for the Mallorca-based German composer who defies categorisation. Only rarely on a concert stage in the UK, though returning for a concert in April at Kings Place in London, Micus, who turned 60 earlier this month, sings and performs on an array of instruments on this his latest album released last week, including Bavarian zither, dilruba, chitrali sitar, and his own customised 14-string guitar. On Panagia, the Virgin Mary, Micus meditates via a concept of female energy inherent in the symbolism. New Agey, contemplative, and thought provoking, the album comes into its own on the third track ‘I Praise You Lady of Passion’, but it’s an hour of music with its alternating sung poems and instrumentals you need to experience as a single entity, preferably in one hearing. A music based on a sense of wonder and mysticism. SG 
Stephan Micus above

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Kenny Wheeler, Norma Winstone, London Vocal Project
Mirrors
Edition **** RECOMMENDED NEW SEASON HIGHLIGHT
With all music by Kenny Wheeler, London Vocal Project director Pete Churchill in the album notes explains that Mirrors was a commission for five solo voices in the first place, and with Norma Winstone and Kenny Wheeler, they duly performed it at the 1998 Berlin Jazz Festival. After performing the material with various college choirs and then, with the London Vocal Project five years ago, Churchill realised he “knew Mirrors had finally found a home.” The poetry of Stevie Smith (1902-1971) lies at its heart, and Kenny Wheeler’s music has meshed with it perfectly. But it’s not just Smith whose work forms the text for the vocals element, here interpreted by the LVP whose members number 25 split into sopranos, altos, tenors and basses, with Wheeler joining on flugelhorn, Winstone the featured solo singer, pianist Nikki Iles, Polar Bear’s Mark Lockheart on saxophones, bassist Steve Watts, and drummer James Maddren. Besides settings of Smith’s work, the highlight of which for me is the delightful ‘Black March’ (‘I have a friend/At the end/Of the world’), there are settings of Lewis Carroll, and briefly WB Yeats (Winstone excelling on ‘The Lover Mourns’). Delight is a word that constantly springs to mind, an echo of ‘I sing this song for your delight’ on ‘Humpty Dumpty’ at the beginning. The singing is lovely throughout, ethereal, and endowed with a life force all of its own. Somehow everything manages to remain understated yet has impact, the unique charm of the album. Mirrors is still a further example, after The Long Waiting, of the extraordinary late-period flowering of Kenny Wheeler’s artistry once again. There’s a section on ‘Through the Looking Glass’ when Wheeler, Lockheart and Winstone interact spontaneously to tremendous effect, but it’s just one instance of the spirit on display on this remarkable album.
Stephen Graham

 

Released on 25 February

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Kyle Eastwood
The View From Here
Jazz Village ***1/2
It’s uncanny although not a drummer’s record, The View From Here has that Jazz Messengers feel subtly transformed organically with the passage of time. “The View From Here” could even be an outlook on a pivotal period of jazz history, the Golden Age in the 1950s and 60s, rather than in some literal sense of a landscape or babbling brook. It’s scenic though, with the two Graemes (Blevins and Flowers) on saxophone and trumpet/flugel respectively, Martyn Kane on drums and Andrew McCormack on piano with Eastwood working as one on some pretty melodies. As much a film composer in recent years he’s no slouch at releasing records with his band and at only 44 Eastwood has packed in a great deal in his career so far. I think From There to Here right at the beginning is his best album to date, but this latest one builds on the huge advances made in Songs from the Chateau, and is easily his most mature album. Eastwood isn’t the most showy of bassists, and his instrument is quietly amplified whether on double or electric bass, and often not that demonstrative even on some of the solos he takes. That’s to his credit to an extent leaving the two Graemes as the public face of the album, with the harmonically advanced McCormack taking up the slack when he chooses to let off some steam. But The View From Here is also a classic hard bop quintet record, and not about the individuals as individuals. So in that sense, and perhaps it’s the first time in Eastwood’s jazz work so far, all the elements of his personal musical interests mostly steeped in the golden age of Blue Note records have come together on one set of tunes. ‘Sirocco’ has a perky “unsquare dance” feel to it (one of the most notable tunes, which each of the band had a hand in writing), and the album is also imbued with a link to the winds of the Mediterranean, and to Africa, with some track titles to reinforce these connections. There’s also, characteristically, an air of romance in Eastwood’s writing, and ‘Luxor’, which Eastwood has co-written with McCormack, is a good showcase for the Clifford Brown side of Graeme Flowers to emerge, with a melody that has a gracenote-leading character, before his peach of a solo. An unashamedly retro album that could have been made in the late-1950s or early-1960s, but no worse for this. If you’re an Eastwood fan already you’ll love this. For the unconvinced The View From Here is as good a place as any to start.
Stephen Graham

Released on 25 March

 

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Oli Rockberger
Old Habits
Oli Road Records ***
Singer-songwriter, keyboardist and arranger Oli Rockberger,  a Londoner who has made his way steadily in the US music industry since studying at Berklee, has played with a host of jazz luminaries since, including the likes of Randy Brecker and Les McCann and two of his  co-written songs will appear on Randy Brecker’s latest album. Old Habits is Rockberger’s second album as a singer songwriter (following the promising Hush Now), and this his latest album to be released in March, has guests who include erstwhile Pat Metheny Group harmonica whiz Gregoire Maret, guitarist John Shannon, and Becca Stevens Band drummer Jordan Perlson. The nine songs, plus bonus track ‘My Home’, are radio friendly jazzy pop with resemblances to Randy Newman and James Taylor. ‘Old Habits Die Hard’ has a bluesy feel that opens out into a gospellised keyboards break with the sound all misted up, which is part of the oblique appeal in the production. ‘Don’t Forget Me’, with multi-tracked vocals, harks back to the Phil Collins 1980s vocal sound circa ‘In the Air Tonight’, and is the best song on the album by far with its air of slight regret (‘Under the stars with the falling snow/Don’t forget me when I go’). The more upbeat ‘Queen of Evasion’ has a Steely Dan-like vibe, while ‘My Home’ has a lovely piano opening, a bit like Bob James would have recorded in years gone by, and sounds as if it could be used as a TV theme. It’s got that slightly ambiguous bittersweet quality, a character the album as a whole shares. Stephen Graham
Oli Rockberger, above
 

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John Turville performed at the first Shearing Hour last night at the Pizza Express Jazz Club in a new early-evening piano hour slot at the Soho club in London. The theme of the hour was the music of George Shearing, and award winning pianist Turville whose album Conception, the title track of which is one of Shearing’s best known compositions, performed some newly transcribed material associated with Shearing. He interpreted Shearing’s signature “locked hands" style admirably, with a nuanced airy feel, and the club’s newly tuned Steinway sounded a treat. As well as ‘Conception’ he played the great Horace Silver’s composition ‘The Outlaw’, which appeared on the Shearing Quintet’s 1960 Capitol album San Francisco Scene, and another of Silver’s, ‘Room 608’. The set also featured ‘Station Break’, a lesser known tune from the Shearing live album Rare Form recorded in San Fran, the standard ‘East of the Sun, West of the Moon’, ‘September in the Rain’ (the Shearing Hour’s theme song), and of course ‘Lullaby of Birdland’, which Turville played quite beautifully. Earlier the audience, who would swell to fill the club to hear jazz singer Clare Teal deliver a fine performance later in the evening with her piano trio, warmed to some original 1947-1952 Shearing gems played over the club’s house sound system. SG
John Turville pictured at the Shearing Hour. Photo: Aimua Eghobamien

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One word is already amounting to a major theme of jazz releases this year and that is: Duke. Of course, it’s Duke as in Ellington, and with Mark Lockheart releasing his remarkable Ellington in Anticipation record and heading out on tour http://marlbank.tumblr.com/post/38943427946/265 , the uncanny Ellingtonian homage in Adrian Johnston’s original music for Dancing on the Edge http://marlbank.tumblr.com/post/40600198373/2847525 set to reach a TV audience next month, the early part of 2013 will also see the release of the Scottish National Jazz Orchestra’s new Spartacus records album In the Spirit of Duke. Recorded in the autumn of last year actually in Scotland the album follows the SNJO’s 2012 debut for ECM, Celebration, which featured Norwegian bass supremo Arild Andersen. Tracks on the new album are thought to include ‘Black & Tan Fantasy’, ‘Concerto for Cootie’, ‘Harlem Airshaft’, ‘The Single Petal of a Rose’, and movements from ‘The Queenʼs Suite’, plus the Ellington Strayhorn jazz adaptation of Edvard Griegʼs ‘Peer Gynt Suite’. Soloists on the album include pianist Brian Kellock, trumpeters Tom MacNiven and Ryan Quigley, alto saxophonist Ru Pattison, and director Tommy Smith on saxophone adopting the role of Paul Gonsalves on the Ellingtonian’s celebrated Newport crowdstealer, ‘Diminuendo and Crescendo in Blue.’ SG
In the Spirit of Duke
is released on 13 March. Members of the Scottish National Jazz Orchestra with Tommy Smith pictured top. Upcoming SNJO dates with guest trumpeter Paolo Fresu are Caird Hall, Dundee,  21 February; Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh, 22 Feb; Royal Conservatoire, Glasgow, 23 Feb; and Macrobert, Stirling, 24 Feb

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Carmen Souza
Kachupada
Galileo ***
The input of the music of the Cape Verde islands in jazz, particularly as it appears indirectly within the music of Horace Silver and more directly with the late Cesária Évora, is considerable, and Souza, who’s in her early thirties from Lisbon of Cape Verdean descent is another part of the stream merging local folkloric musics and jazz. Released in France as long ago as September the new album comes out in the UK next month. Called Kachupada, after a well loved Cape Verdean dish, Souza is certainly not brand new, but fairly unknown to jazz audiences in the UK, although world music fans know of her here more but she has mutual appeal it’s clear. A decade ago the singer whose voice has a lingering contralto lilt was first working with the producer bassist Theo Pas’cal and she debuted in 2003 with an album that mixed Creole, African and Cape Verdean rhythms. Poppy at times, but not as light as a singer such as Luisa Sobral, on the new album Souza lets loose some lively vocalese on tracks such as ‘Tchega’, and there are jazz standards such as ‘Donna Lee’ and ‘My Favourite Things’ here sparkily handled, with a sympathetic band varying in size as the album tracks demand. So, a laidback sound with plenty of jazz textures (fine instrumental solos for instance saxophonist Guto Lucena’s on ‘Terra Sab’ [‘Amazing Land’]), along with pleasurable rhythms in abundance, although saudade is never far away. SG 

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Following news earlier this week that Liane Carroll is to headline the new Brilliant Corners festival in March, the following month, it’s now understood, will see the latest album to be released by the award winning singer who is also touring heavily in the spring. Titled, quite simply, Ballads, it’s the classic jazz singer’s latest for Quiet Money Recordings, trumpeter James McMillan’s label, who returns to produce Liane once more following their work together on Up and Down released two years ago. This new album features arrangements by Chris Walden whose work includes Paul McCartney’s 2012 album, Kisses on the Bottom

Ballads tracks include ‘Here’s To Life’, featuring Carroll’s powerful vocals along with classical guitar and celeste; ‘Goodbye’ with a Walden orchestration and Mark Edwards on piano; a big band take on ‘Only The Lonely’ (not the Roy Orbison song, the Sammy Cahn/Jimmy van Heusen torch song closely identified with Frank Sinatra); ‘Mad About The Boy’ with an appearance by pianist Gwilym Simcock; jazz standard ‘You’ve Changed’; Todd Rundgren’s ‘Pretending To Care’ featuring the bass clarinet of Julian Siegel; ‘Calgary Bay’ by songwriter Sophie Bancroft; a strong reading of ‘My One and Only Love’; ‘Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow’ with acoustic guitar and the saxophone of Kirk Whalum who worked with Liane on Up and Down; ‘The Two Lonely People’; and the Buddy Holly associated song ‘Raining in My Heart’. Stephen Graham
Liane Carroll pictured top, and the album’s cover. Ballads is released on 15 April

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Muddy Waters’ son, bluesman Mud Morganfield, and a debuting Champian Fulton, are two highlights of this year’s Fife Jazz Festival fast approaching. New York-based singer Fulton is appearing with her trio. imageAlso for Fife in 2013 are The Norrbotten Big Band, Carla Cook, Graeme Stephen, Erja Lyytinen, The Nimmo Brothers, Red Stripe, Dan Block, Eric Alexander, Tim Kliphuis, Brian Kellock, and David Blenkhorn. This weekend festival runs from 1-3 February, and concerts are spread across the kingdom of Fife in cities and towns from Anstruther to Auchtermuchty, with main concerts in Dunfermline, Glenrothes and St Andrews. SG
Above Mud Morganfield, and right Champian Fulton. For the full programme click http://www.fifejazzfestival.com/2013-programme.html

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Vole
The Hillside Mechanisms
Babel ****
Roland Ramanan, the trumpeter son of the influential West Indian trumpeter and poet Shake Keane to whom he paid tribute on the 2002 Emanem album Shaken, has with this trio record laid down a substantial footprint all of his own. Vole, on the record that’s Ramanan, guitarist/electronicist Roberto Sassi, and drummer Javier Carmona, in their band name sound as if they collect together as one small creature, but the album artwork with its mechanical drawings makes one think not of a small being but instead of a futuristic machine as the artwork has some extraordinary cylindrical apparatus depicted in diagram form. Ramanan, who is also known for his longstanding work with the London Improvisers Orchestra, as well as his bands Swift and Wooden Tops, was inspired early in his career by the drummer and educator John Stevens at a Search and Reflect workshop. In the album note to this Babel records release, one of the distinguished label’s finest, speaking of the Hillside in the title Ramanan refers to the road where the “laboratory” of drummer Carmona’s house has acted as a hub for musicians such as himself and guitarist Sassi, who has also created the artwork, “passing through”. What they concocted musically via this meeting of minds was to draw on pure improvisation and composed music. Ramanan, speaking further of “interesting interlocking rhythm structures as well as a certain gritty edge to it”, has an appealing tone, a little reminiscent of Don Cherry’s but also with the wildness of the European avant garde, say early Enrico Rava. There’s also a tenderness on a tune such as ‘No Knees’ that says hit the replay. An album that’s both free jazz and improv (sometimes it’s easy to say one or the other, harder to claim both), and to my mind this doubling indicates width and vision in both performance and improvisational approach. Co-operatively written the eight tracks with the unobtrusive electronic textures on ‘Tim’s Frosties’ just one of the ways the music manifests itself, the exploratory forays of Ramanan’s here and on other tracks, and prevailing drums, a little like the Sunny Murray approach, add up to an excellent album. 

Stephen Graham
Vole, top

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The Shearing Hour launches at Pizza Express Jazz Club on Thursday. It’s a solo piano hour beginning at 7.15, ahead of singer Clare Teal’s return to the club later in the evening. The first Shearing Hour, named after the great pianist and composer George Shearing, features a set from pianist John Turville whose trio album Conception was released in the autumn by F-IRE Records. The winner of a Parliamentary Jazz Award for best album in 2011 Turville’s debut Midas turned heads on release gaining a profile for the pianist and composer part of the burgeoning Walthamstow scene. On Conception, he was joined by Jamie Cullum bassist Chris Hill and drummer Ben Reynolds plus cellist Eduardo Vassallo on some tracks. The album highlight turned out to be its title track ‘Conception’, the George Shearing bop original arranged sympathetically by Turville.

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The Shearing Hour with its theme of ‘September in the Rain’ has never been a better time to recall Sir George Shearing who died on Valentine’s day in 2011 at the age of 91. Famed for ‘Lullaby of Birdland’, the 1952 theme that was written for the original New York jazz club Birdland, Shearing was a hero of the beats and in On the Road Jack Kerouac writes: “Shearing rose from the piano, dripping with sweat; these were his great 1949 days before he became cool and commercial. When he was gone Dean pointed to the empty piano seat. ‘God’s empty chair,’ he said. God was gone; it was the silence of his departure. It was a rainy night. It was the myth of the rainy night.” Shearing who was blind was born in Battersea and after learning piano at the Linden Lodge school for the blind became a pub pianist in Lambeth, and after a break began recording for BBC radio in the late-1930s. He joined a band led by Harry Parry and won Melody Maker awards before two years after the war emigrating to the United States where he made a name for himself playing at New York night spot the Hickory House with the Oscar Pettiford Trio. Later he recorded for Capitol (famously with Nat King Cole one of several revered albums for the label), among other record companies. His quintet with vibes player Margie Hyams, guitarist Chuck Wayne, bassist John Levy and drummer Denzil Best recorded the best selling ‘September in the Rain’ for MGM and the quintet with different personnels ran intermittently until the late-1970s. The Shearing Hour, put together by Marlbank in association with Pizza Express Jazz Club, is a celebration of the great man’s music and an introduction to the fine talent of John Turville.
Stephen Graham
John Turville top and Sir George Shearing above. pizzaexpresslive.co.uk Visit the Shearing Hour on Pinterest for clips and photos http://pinterest.com/shearinghour/the-shearing-hour

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Liane Carroll, David Lyttle, Mark Lockheart’s Ellington In Anticipation, Steve Davis, and Alexander Hawkins are part of the line-up of the first Brilliant Corners jazz festival, to be held in Belfast from 21-23 March at the MAC, the Black Box and the Belfast Barge. Taking place in the city’s Cathedral Quarter, the three-day festival, which draws its name from the classic 1957 Thelonious Monk Riverside album, is promoted by leading Northern Ireland producer Moving on Music.

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Director Brian Carson says: “Many of today’s more popular music forms take direct influence from jazz and there seems to be a real movement at the moment. Jazz has had a bit of an image problem in recent years, which is definitely changing. We’re seeing a whole new audience coming to our events throughout the year, and an extremely talented group of new musicians emerging. It’s an exciting time.” The line-up is: Continuous Battle Of Order, Decoy (Thursday 21 March, Black Box); Meilana Gillard’s Fine Print (21 March, Barge); Ellington in Anticipation (21 March, MAC); David Lyttle and Interlude (Friday 22 March, Black Box); Ronnie Greer Blues Trio (22 March, Barge); Steve Davis’ Human (22 March, MAC); Arthur Kell (Saturday 23 March, Barge); and Liane Carroll (23 March, MAC). Stephen Graham
David Lyttle top right, to play the Black Box at Brilliant Corners, and Liane Carroll headlining at the MAC on the Saturday night

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Eleni Karaindrou
Concert in Athens
ECM New Series ***
With a considerable body of work for ECM already in the catalogue, this Athens concert hall performance of music by the distinguished veteran film, theatre and TV composer Eleni Karaindrou recorded in 2010 begins somewhat glacially with saxophonist Jan Garbarek a slightly masked presence at first. Slowly its treasure unfolds as the strings draw out the tender theme. Along with other guests, celebrated viola player Kim Kashkashian and oboist Vangelis Christopoulos with Karaindrou on piano, this chamber music album, utilising a small band of musicians and the Camerata Friends of Music Orchestra conducted by Alexandros Myrat, takes in music written for the films of the late Theo Angelopoulos, with whom Karaindrou is strongly associated, as well as music for the theatre including American classics Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Death of a Salesman. ‘Requiem for Willie Loman’, the tragic hero of Arthur Miller’s great play, and the very theme captured so well by Garbarek, and reprised at the end of the album once more, is the sort of work that the composer must have had to keep a brave face writing. You’d need to be made of flint not to be moved by this album highlight as it unfolds so unflinchingly and returns so effectively at the album’s conclusion. So, superior arthouse mood music as a whole, with a serious disposition the meditational footprint of which is often tellingly felt. SG
Released on 11 February 

Dominic Alldis
A Childhood Suite
Canzona ***1/2
In Dominic Alldis’s latest trio album A Childhood Suite for jazz piano trio and orchestra, the pianist, arranger, and composer explains he is “always looking for melodic material with which to inspire new creative projects.” He had realized at an earlier point that the simplicity of nursery rhymes allowed for great variation and instant recognition, and earlier album Songs We Heard (with bassist Mark Hodgson and drummer Stephen Keogh) first drew on the idea of a trio improvising on nursery rhymes from around the world. This new release reworks more than a dozen of these arrangements, adding a string section and containing an Alldis original. With the pianist are modern-mainstream bassist Andrew Cleyndert, and Spin Marvel drummer Martin France, whose trio work with John Taylor and Palle Danielsson has been justly praised. Beautifully recorded at Menuhin Hall, A Childhood Suite, has a simplicity and sincerity rare these days in the hustle and bustle of the record industry demanding a certain crash, bang, wallop approach. You many have come across Bruno Heinen’s Dialogues trio record Twinkle Twinkle last year, when the pianist put ‘Twinkle Twinkle’ under the microscope as Mozart did in a different time and fashion, and as Alldis does here. But think of A Childhood Suite as a broader sweep, beyond jazz although of it in the same way as the album draws on classical music, with a soft soothing touch more like a finely constructed harmonic reverie than a more inquisitive foray at the raw materials of the musical themes. ‘London Bridge is Falling Down’ is typical of some of the momentum generated by the trio, and with a dark opening, the mood changes to allow for a developing momentum and joyousness that many of the other improvisations also possess. Very much in the Jacques Loussier or David Rees-Williams stream of light jazz and classical synthesis it’s an album that never lacks for charm and empathy, with some lovely moments along the way including the captivating Vaughan Williams-like violin solo and fine arrangement on ‘Girls and Boys Come Out To Play.’ Stephen Graham
The Dominic Alldis trio pictured above

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Last year was like a dream for Roller Trio, and it wasn’t just that they picked up nods from the Mercury and MOBO prize panjandrums or surprise discombobulated indie scenesters at the Roundhouse. It was also a good year for the F-IRE label whose vicarious pleasure in their band’s success was palpable. image
This year, once the snow has melted, is about touring and while the northern outfit is not returning to Milo’s in Leeds where the fuse was lit at least on YouTube where you’ll see them play ‘The Nail That Stands Up’, Roller Trio are appearing not far away at the Venue in Leeds College of Music, the very college where the band first met. Super educated young jazz polite boys and girls who haven’t heard them so far can catch the band there should they venture out or at a jazz spot around and about. Dates are: The Lescar, Sheffield (30 January); Kings Place, London (2 February); King Tut’s, Glasgow (23 Feb); Capstone Theatre, Liverpool (28 Feb); Norwich Arts Centre, Norwich (7 March); Vibraphonic Festival, Exeter (14 March); Venue, Leeds (22 March); Cheltenham Jazz Festival, Cheltenham (6 May); and Hare and Hounds, Birmingham, on 29 May. SG
The Venue, Leeds College of Music top where Roller trio above, right play in March

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The James Taylor Quartet are to release their latest album Closer to the Moon an album that suggests a broadening of scope for the Jimmy Smith-influenced Hammond organ-led acid jazz era band as the album planned for a 6 May release is to bristle with added celeste, vibes, harp, zither, gong, glockenspiel, and apparently even tubular bells. Hammond man Taylor who fronts the longstanding outfit also takes a lead vocal on ‘Close To You’, a definite departure. JTQ touring dates before the album release include a return to Ronnie Scott’s, London appearing with the Nick Smart Horns and singer Yvonne Yanney from 20-23 March; then the Donkey in Leicester on 6 April; Guildhall, Portsmouth (12 April); and Assembly Hall, Islington, London for two nights on 3-4 May just ahead of Closer to the Moon album day. SG
James Taylor, above
 

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In the National Theatre foyer earlier, and returning later this afternoon for a further 90-minute set, singer Aimua Eghobamien’s Indigo Sessions took the chill off a wintry day on the Southbank with a fine mix of songs subtly delivered. Featuring two double bassists Jerome Davies and Oli Hayhurst joining Eghobamien and The Face of Mount Molehill violinist Julian Ferraretto the set opened with a poised, downtempo reading of the 1920s Irving Berlin standard ‘Blue Skies’ , but the highlight was perhaps Randy Newman’s ‘Same Girl’ from the singer/songwriter’s Trouble in Paradise album released 30 years ago this month, with a lyric close enough to indigo just like the opening Berlin song, the ‘Same Girl’ lyric effortlessly captured by Eghobamien’s bass baritone: ‘With the same sweet smile that you always had/And the same blue eyes like the sun’, performed with a suitably languid jazz connotation. SG
Indigo Sessions above continue at 5.45 

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Dieter Ilg
Parsifal
ACT ***

Eric Schaefer
Who Is Afraid of Richard W.?
ACT ***
With a Wagner connection, both albums, despite one playfully equipped with a question mark, find solutions to a problem that doesn’t really exist. If anyone wants to cover classical material even by a hideously divisive figure such as Wagner, then there really isn’t anything new or necessarily interesting in this. After all since Jacques Loussier’s interpreting of Bach, or classical composers from Milhaud on incorporating jazz into their compositional approach, it’s not a live issue. Bassist Ilg, who knows his Verdi as well as his Wagner, performs his Parsifal with the trio of pianist Rainer Böhm and drummer Patrice Héral with respect and gentleness, and it corresponds to the orthodox modern jazz piano style that’s not dissimilar to the tasteful approach of the Benedikt Jahnel Trio indicated on Equilibrium, although there is some fulfilling Ilg Trio improvising on tracks such as ‘Ich bin ein reiner Tor’, as any “fool” might discover. There’s some familiar Beethoven tucked in as well at the end.

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Ilg offers variations on Wagner in essence but [em] drummer Schaefer’s album is “revisiting”, and despite the loaded terminology has more impact, flavoured by the superb pristine trumpet and flugel tone and interpretative subtlety of Tom Arthurs who you’ll also hear on the upcoming Julia Hülsmann quartet album. It’s not as conventional as Ilg’s, with bits of reggae on his own tune ‘Nietzsche in Disguise’ for instance, and Volker Meitz’s steamy organ intro to ‘Lohengrin’ is an inventive touch that does work especially when Arthurs builds a solo from its marshy base. Bassist John Eckhardt is also clearly a name to watch. If you liked Schaefer’s groove on ‘Das Modell’ on Wasted and Wanted you’ll want to hear what he does on this album from a drumming point of view, but the overall concept of both albums is more of a burden than a plus.

Stephen Graham 

Both albums are released on 11 February. Dieter Ilg, top, and the cover of Who Is Afraid of Richard W.?

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Francesc Marco (on accordion) and Fred Thomas set up as bassist Jiri Slavik looks on at the soundcheck before last night’s Fly Agaric gig at the Vortex in Dalston. Joined by fourth member, reedsman Zac Gvi, later to complete their set-up the F-IRE Collective band went on to perform selections from their new album for the label, In Search of Soma. Opening with ‘Closely Observed Trains’, which takes its name from an influential 1966 Czech film, three of the band curiously donned bright red “mushroom hats”, a link to the fungus-loving outfit’s name. Later tunes included a trenchant juxtaposition of a discredited speech of Nicolas Sarkozy’s with a puckishly Mingusian groove on ‘Travailler plus pour gagner plus’; a brand new song translated as ‘Wicked’ in English, charismatic frontman Gvi explained with a laugh; and the pleasantly tricksy ‘It takes one two, no’, surely a soundcheck special at least in spirit. Marco on piano added some great stride touches towards the end while Gvi channelled his inner Prez. SG

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Lunchtime today sees the beginning of a major solo piano tour by Robert Mitchell, during which his latest album The Glimpse will be released. A solo feature for left hand only its dozen tracks contain some of the most unusual piano music you’ll hear this year. In the notes to the Whirlwind Records release Mitchell talks of the challenge of undertaking the project in the first place. “I don’t believe,” he says, “there has been anywhere near enough recording to address what I think is a strongly valid form of piano music – that made by the left hand alone. And the insisting that improvisation play a part, also takes this to a rare, but intensely interesting place for me.” Initially drawn to the idea by writing for a classical piano event, the title track Mitchell says integrates the “different pathways and possibilities” that the task could take him to. The pianist, who received acclaim for his earlier less unconventional piano solo album Equinox released in 2007 cites classical piano history specifically Zichy, Wittgenstein and Godowsky in terms of left hand-only playing, with jazz connections encompassing the music of Phineas Newborn Jr and Kenny Drew among others. On The Glimpse recorded at the Capstone Theatre in Liverpool last summer Mitchell has composed all the music except for classical composer Frederico Mompou’s ‘Prelude No 6’, which trumpeter Byron Wallen had alerted Mitchell to, and ‘Nocturne for the Left hand Alone’ by American pianist Fred Hersch, a “modern classic”, Mitchell says of it. This new album certainly makes me for one think of solo piano a little differently, as it’s like looking at a familiar building from a different angle and in so doing finding detail hitherto neglected or taken for granted. It’s about an altered reality for sure. Track six ‘The Sage’ in only five minutes and nineteen seconds the composition has a cinematic reach within this small time that is very remarkable. Rhapsodic, the restriction imposed by playing left hand only is not a barrier in the least, although as elsewhere on the album sometimes there is a feeling that it’s a bass player’s record! An innovative album then, don’t assume a thing.
Stephen Graham

The tour begins with a Royal Festival Hall foyer concert at 1pm
See www.robertmitchellmusic.com for further tour dates. 
The Glimpse is released on 18 February. Robert Mitchell, above