An accountant by training who used to manage the Jazz Cafe and The Forum for promoter Mean Fiddler, has opened a new jazz venue in London’s Herne Hill. Tony Dyett opened Jazz on the Hill, a smart street front cafe bar with good sight lines on Railton Road very close to Herne Hill station in late-June, and it all got underway in some style with a range of high profile jazz acts.

With bookings now under the personal remit of Dyett the cafe has an eclectic Caribbean-style menu and presents jazz on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays with open mic nights on Sundays and weekly blues nights on Tuesdays. Dyett says the Herne Hill area is in need of a jazz club and already locals are looking to the club as a regular haunt. Anton Browne

It’s on the site of a former night club and the Poet’s Bar but Dyett and his team have made a series of much needed alterations, including moving the bar further to the right, removing stud walls and relocating the kitchen. Jazz on the Hill is working with local visual artists mounting exhibition space at the front of the club and at the rear for regular art exhibitions, and a relationship has also been established with the local Sunday farmers market with jazz becoming a soundtrack to activities on the street as shoppers sample the local traders’ wares.

There’s no house drum kit just yet, and the piano is a modest upright but with good sound, attractive decor and an easily accessible location, Jazz on the Hill adds considerably to the profile of jazz in south London with Hideaway in Streatham not far away, already a major draw.

Upcoming bookings for the venue include Anton Browne Trio (9 August), The Esther Bennett Trio (10 August), Alan Barnes Quartet (11 August) and the Brandon Allen Trio (16 August) - Stephen Graham

www.jazzonthehill.co.uk

The exterior of Jazz on the Hill (pictured, top), and Anton Browne appearing on Thursday 9 August above

Stian Westerhus
The Matriarch and the Wrong Kind of Flowers
Rune Grammofon ****
Westerhus is the Nordic jazz cognoscenti’s guitarist of choice, and this album more than explains why. Just guitars and voice the ex-Fraud and recent Nils Petter Molvaer sideman pulls off a formidable coup with this tantalisingly anti-chillout excursion. The Terje Rypdal of his generation it’s clear, Westerhus slowly unfolds slabs of sonic sophistication in a masterfully unhurried style.
Released on 17 August 



Django Bates Belovèd
Confirmation
Lost Marble ****
Three years on from their first album, and still keeping Charlie Parker as honorary inspiration, Django Bates, Petter Eldh and Peter Bruun, joined by Ashley Slater on Bacharach/David’s ‘A House is Not A Home’, are on dazzling form with an album that’s sure to delight longstanding Django fans.  It’s complex for sure, relevant to the bop tradition just like the first album, but with a warmth and curiosity that has a life force all of its own. Head straight for the hucklebuck meditation, ‘Now’s The Time’, but Slater’s lounge-sleazy vocal is also a big plus.
Released on 17 September

Yaron Herman
Alter Ego
ACT ****
With pianist Yaron Herman in trio mode I have often felt he’s a musician in search of a band. Expanding to a quintet here he’s finally found a better expression for his huge talent. Go down to the beautifully revealing ‘Mechanical Brothers’ for a great piano-led beat cooked up along with bassist Stéphane Kerecki, leading into suitably dank and drizzling saxophone from highly promising Kansas City altoist  Logan Richardson and Herman’s long time playing colleague Emile Parisien.
Released on 28 September  

 



Pierrick Pédron
Kubic’s Monk
ACT ***
I was pretty unimpressed by the self-consciousness of Pédron’s earlier album Cheerleaders, but the alto saxophonist has turned things around dramatically here with this fine Monk-themed trio album he has also co-arranged. Featuring much talked about Blue Note trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire on three tracks, you’ve just got to hear Ambrose burn the house down on ‘Ugly Beauty.’
Released on 28 September 

Stephen Graham

Next year Brad Mehldau will be touring with former Avishai Cohen drummer Mark Guiliana but before that and following quickly on from Ode, a companion album, Where Do You Start, taking its name from the Johnny Mandel, Marilyn Bergman and Alan Bergman song, is to be released on 17 September, the pianist’s label Nonesuch has confirmed. Barbra Streisand covered the song to great effect on her Columbia album Love Is The Answer three years ago.

Performing with his familiar trio of Larry Grenadier and Jeff Ballard on Where Do You Start, Mehldau, who is due to play the London Jazz Festival in November with the trio, has included his celebrated and so far unreleased take on Sufjan Stevens’ ‘Holland’ on this album, which Mehldau fans will know nearly always steals the show when he performs it live, often as an encore.

But the album actually opens with ‘Got Me Wrong’ by Jerry Cantrell of the grunge band Alice in Chains, a song that appeared on the soundtrack of Kevin Smith’s film Clerks and was released as a single in the wake of the film’s runaway success in 1994. 

Other tracks are ‘Brownie Speaks’ by Clifford Brown; ‘Baby Plays Around’, by Elvis Costello and his former wife Cait O’Riordan of The Pogues; ‘Airegin’ by Sonny Rollins; ‘Hey Joe’ by Californian folkster Billy Roberts made famous by Jimi Hendrix; ‘Samba E Amor’ by Rio legend Chico Buarque; ‘Jam’ by Mehldau, his only self-penned song on the album; ‘Time Has Told Me’ by Nick Drake, whose songs Mehldau interprets so intuitively; ‘Aquelas Coisas Todas’ by Clube da Esquina guitarist Toninho Horta; and the tearjerking ‘Where Do You Start.’

Stephen Graham

Brad Mehldau, pictured top