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Sonny Rollins and Wayne Shorter among the giants of jazz performing in 21st running of the London Jazz Festival

Tickets go on sale on Friday for some of the big names just announced for the 21st London Jazz Festival to be held this year. With the BBC having now ended its long-running commitment as a festival sponsor the LJF adds three replacement letters, EFG, a private bank, who have been involved with the festival since 2008, in the corporation’s place. The festival which runs from 15-24 November will also feature Jazz Voice on opening night at the Barbican; Hugh Masekela and Larry Willis; Stan Sulzmann’s Neon Orchestra; Arild Andersen; Schlippenbach Trio vs Noszferatu; the Wayne Shorter Quartet and BBC Concert Orchestra at the Barbican; a Charlie Parker on Dial jazz theatre event; Sonny Rollins this time at the Royal Albert Hall; Tigran Hamasyan + Elina Duni; Mehliana; John McLaughlin and Zakir Hussain: Remember Shakti; Gilad Atzmon at the QEH; and Madeleine Peyroux at the Festival Hall.

Sonny Rollins above

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Erin Boheme + Tammy Weis, Hippodrome, London tonight

When jazz and pop collides it can be messy. But if the tunes are good, the spirit’s right, the words to the songs possessing a staying power, delivered by a confident performer then what’s not to like: it’s not as if it’s life or death, is it?

Tonight at the Hippodrome in London’s west end Wisconsin-born Erin Boheme makes her London debut following the release of What a Life last month on Heads Up. She’s to be joined by Tammy Weis, a London-based Canadian singer who’s a well kept secret until, well, now on the London jazz vocals scene. Tammy’s also co-written one of the songs on the album as previously reported in these pages. Michael Bublé no less has produced this album… so where’s the jazz you might ask?! Well if you ask that kind of question, this album is not for you. It’s about songs, not improvising, but it’s perfectly compatible within its commercial framework rather than the flawed smooth jazz format that is now disappearing. Contrast the Eric Benet smooth jazz version of ‘The Last Time’ with the version here and there’s a huge difference in interpretation, and it’s less cheesy for sure. In Benet’s take on his own highly effective melancholic song, co-written among others with famed songwriter David Foster incidentally also chair of the Verve Music Group (who penned ‘I Have Nothingfor the late Whitney Houston), the natural feeling gets lost a bit crouched behind the layers of glossy audio production and arrangement.

Bublé’s approach although you mightn’t think so at first blush is to strip away the varnish, and let the songs breathe, and Carly Simon-loving Boheme begins demurely on a low key Caro Emerald-esque rumba ‘Everything But Me’, Tammy’s song, which is close enough for jazz put it on Born To Sing: No Plan B. Why Boheme needed to cover a Coldplay song I don’t know, and I didn’t care one bit for the Bublé-sounding Spencer Day who is on the otherwise excellent ‘I’d Love To Be Your Last’. But ‘One More Try’ is quite superb, and jazz-intuitive, and of the band we really should be hearing more of pianist Alan Chang who co-wrote the song with Boheme. Overall then, songs that will stay with you, delivered by a singer who clearly believes in her material and carries both the record and the day.

Erin Boheme above 
www.hippodromecasino.com