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She’s been on the cover of both Downbeat and Jazz Times, and with the release of her latest album Claroscuro as recently as the autumn, the multi-award winning clarinet, bass clarinet and saxophone player Anat Cohen, with a finely honed individualism in her extraordinarily burnished playing, here achieves maximum impact with her down home version of Abdullah Ibrahim’s ‘The Wedding’. That version alone along with her reputation Stateside should whet the appetites of UK jazz fans sufficiently to draw the serious jazz heads down to the Soho basement club she’s to play when the Israeli-born musician debuts in the UK for a first appearance in London next month as part of a brief European tour. With a band on the album that includes the hip Jason Lindner on piano, skilled bassist Joe Martin, and drummer Daniel Freedman, all of whom are making the trip, there’s much to savour from the deep traditions of jazz clarinet onwards towards the modern global sound on an album that playfully uses the Spanish spelling of the Italian word ‘chiaroscuro’ in its title. Don’t forget to catch Cohen’s wonderful take on Artie Shaw’s ‘Nightmare’, with Paquito d’Rivera guesting, if you pick up Claroscuro. Stephen Graham  
Anat Cohen above plays the Pizza Express Jazz Club in London on 20 March with her quartet.
Tickets: www.pizzaexpresslive.co.uk

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There’s a jam session explosion at the moment with recently launched sessions at Charlie Wright’s, run by the Jazz Warriors, Hannes Riepler downstairs at the Vortex, and the continuing vibrant scene both upstairs at Ronnie Scott’s and downstairs there with the laidback Late Late Show programming. Across Soho at Pizza Express Jazz Club the Whirlwind Sessions is the latest to add to the London scene’s resurgent fecundity, and Friday 8 March from 11.30pm-3am sees the first of the Michael Janisch-helmed label sessions. It’s free to get in, and double bassist Janisch, with saxophonist Zhenya Strigalev, who used to host nights and jam at Charlie Wright’s, in association with Maggie Black Productions, have set up the jam session with a Whirlwind artist leading each running, choosing the format, either quartet or quintet, and then opening the bandstand up for invited guests later. The 8 March jam has Janisch and Strigalev, plus Partisans guitarist Phil Robson (just in action this past weekend with the Hans Koller Ensemble), and Robson’s Partisans bandmate Gene Calderazzo on drums. SG  

The wind’s whipping up: Michael Janisch top 

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EXCLUSIVE Although details are still to be further fleshed out and officially announced, this summer will see a major new festival series of concerts involving a number of symphony orchestras across Europe performing the music of the late great Esbjörn Svensson, the charismatic and influential pianist and composer who tragically died on 14 June 2008 aged just 44 as a result of a scuba diving accident in his native Sweden. Svensson changed the face of European jazz, and has influenced countless numbers of bands around the world including Trichotomy, GoGo Penguin, Tingvall Trio, Neil Cowley Trio, and not forgetting Brad Mehldau, to name just five, and who gained the appreciation and respect of jazz giant Pat Metheny who performed memorably with EST at the Jazz Baltica festival. Svensson was the most significant figure in Swedish jazz since Jan Johansson in the 1960s the revered figure best known for his classic album Jazz på svenska (‘Jazz in Swedish’), which used European folk music as an ingredient for jazz improvisation, one of the first to do so. The Västeras-born Svensson unlike Johansson harnessed the power of rock, free jazz, and electronics allying them to his own virtuoso grasp of the music of the masters of jazz piano including chiefly Thelonious Monk in the early stages of his career and Svensson’s compositional strength rooted within the co-operative spirit of the trio as the band shared writing duties and credits. Following study at the University of Stockholm Svensson founded EST in 1993 with his childhood friend drummer Magnus Öström and bassist Dan Berglund. They together went on to become global jazz stars, releasing 11 albums during Esbjörn’s lifetime with another, Leucocyte, appearing shortly after Svensson’s death, and four years later the extraordinary 301 released in March last year. Further details are to be confirmed by the band’s management but work is understood to be well advanced on symphonic arrangements of Svensson’s music with partner symphony orchestras lined up across Europe for performances in the summer with a possible UK orchestra involved for concerts in the autumn. 
(UPDATE): 
The orchestral arrangements are by Uppsala-born conductor and arranger Hans Ek, known for his work as music director of the Polar Music Prize ceremony, where he has arranged and performed with the Stockholm Royal Philharmonic Orchestra music by Pink Floyd, Peter Gabriel, Björk, and Paul Simon among the winners of the prestigious prize, as well as orchestrating for theatre and film including Dogme director Thomas Vinterberg’s 2007 film A Man Comes HomeEST manager Burkhard Hopper says the festival details will be announced in April, and they will include some major European festivals this summer. “We will work with local pianists who have shown through their recordings/music/playing that they carry the torch of Esbjörn forward. There are no plans for an album yet.” 

Stephen Graham

EST above

Jazz would never be the same again http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtEztYjk88s

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Jazz guitar legend Martin Taylor is to pair up with the Chet Atkins-influenced fingerstyle guitar star Tommy Emmanuel for new album The Colonel and the Governor and the duo embark on a big UK and Irish tour during the month of release. Taylor who has jazz chops to burn can play most things and the album beginning with ‘I Won’t Last A Day Without You’ for the first few dozen bars could be in any style. Slowly but surely the jazz connotation comes through on the upbeat partially countrified song, but there are uncategorisable moments throughout the album and little blissful pleasures you wouldn’t want to hazard a guess at, such as the lovely ballad ‘Heat Wave’ redolent of an exile’s reverie. ‘Jersey Bounce’ could easily sit on one of those Woody Allen films long ago when an outside, slightly ambivalent, walking scene maybe involving Woody trying to avoid some girl friend or other would require a wry theme with a little pitch bending from Emanuel doing the trick and the trademark Taylor motion.

On ‘Bernie’s Tune’ (made famous by Gerry Mulligan in the 1950s) the musicians clearly let loose from the start with get-stuck-in laughs and a dash of gypsy jazz. Taylor whose Spirit of Django band brought gypsy jazz to a wide audience in the 1990s is in his element here, and for Emmanuel it’s to the manner born. Other tunes are ‘A Smooth One’, ‘True’, ‘Heat Wave’ referred to earlier, ‘One Day’, George Shearing’s ‘Lullaby of Birdland’ with a sort of double staircase scale-melting introduction as the guitarists ascend and descend to meet on the shared landing of the melody, ‘The Nearness of You’, ‘Down at Cocomos’, a favourite of Taylor’s with the lilting Caribbean melody a live mainstay for the leading UK jazz guitarist in recent years, ‘The Fair Haired Child’, ‘Secret Love’, a solo for Emmanuel, ‘Wonderful Baby’, and Billy Taylor’s ‘I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free’ finishing things off. Taylor and Emmanuel have known each other and played together since the 1990s. The tour begins in Belfast on 2 March at the Ulster Hall, continuing at the University Concert Hall, Limerick (3 March); Opera House, Cork (4 March, album release date); Helix Theatre, Dublin (5 March); Anvil, Basingstoke (6 March); Waterside Theatre, Aylesbury (7 March); Sage, Gateshead (8 March); Bridgewater Hall, Manchester (9 March); Robin 2, Wolverhampton (10 March); Queen’s Theatre, Barnstaple (12 March); Corn Exchange, Exeter (13 March); Colston Hall, Bristol (14 March); Shepherd’s Bush Empire, London (16 March); Leas Cliffe Hall, Folkestone (17 March); Hawth, Crawley (18 March); Corn Exchange, Ipswich (20 March); Winding Wheel, Chesterfield (21 March); Victoria Theatre, Halifax (22 March); Coronation Hall, Ulverston (24 March); Lemon Tree, Aberdeen (26 March); and Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh (28 March). SG

Tommy Emmanuel above left and Martin Taylor. Photo: Allen Clarke 

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Is there such a thing as a spoof piano trio? Well I guess there is but in irony-loving jazz circles [em], even in Dalston, would not qualify. The only thing ‘pretend’ about the trio on this showing was the German jazz piano trio’s fluently elegant take on Komeda’s music for Roman Polanski’s 1967 knockabout curiosity The Fearless Vampire Killers, the first song of the second set. What would bat connoisseur Professor Abronsius, in the film played by the great Beckettian actor Jack MacGowran, have made of it? Who knows, but aficionados of these small nocturnal mammals have a thing or two in common with jazz fans, 50 or so of whom were gathered last night (thankfully the right way up) in the Vortex for the return to the club of pianist Michael Wollny, bassist Eva Kruse, and drummer Eric Schaefer. Opening with two numbers from their 2006 album II, Schaefer’s ‘So Will Die Sonn’ Nun Untergehen’ and ‘Phelgma Phighter’, the band soon hit their stride with the long haired youthful-looking Wollny fleet of foot and luxuriously supple in his darting runs, while Kruse, who is expecting a baby, was smilingly attentive and supremely intuitive in her confidently startling harmonic counterblasts. ‘Dario’ from last year’s superb Wasted & Wanted, with Schaefer picking up a melodica at the beginning of the number, altered the focus of the set as it gained content and depth and Schaefer’s little touches on bells and scuffling industrial sounds as well as his ability to rock out added much to the beautiful, often sensuous, voicings that Wollny habitually creates. Their remarkable version of Schubert’s ‘Ihr Bild’ was even better than on the excellent album version. Wollny mused at the end that Kraftwerk were in town at Tate Modern before [em] launched into their intuitively recomposed version of ‘Das Modell’. A world away from the ritual of electronic music, [em] are streets ahead of anyone’s idea of a jazz trio and have just got to be heard. Stephen Graham

 

There’s a kind of perceived wisdom out there that bands that play together stay together. So instead of their members picking up gigs wherever they can, they only play in one formation and you don’t see them anywhere else until they break up. It’s a hard thing to do, and only a tiny number of bands manage it, EST, the chief example for many years.

Yet other bands and their individual members thrive on separate lives from time to time and Phronesis is one of them. The trio even operated as the band of Nordic sax ace Marius Neset when he was starting to make a name for himself in the UK.

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Phronesis pianist Ivo Neame, who’s playing at the Vortex tomorrow with his celebrated octet, has created some space away from the band, and Phronesis founder Jasper Høiby crops up regularly with other leading bands.

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Phronesis are touring in the UK in April previewing new material for their next album with a big gig at the QEH in London on 5 April as well as a date in Suffolk a couple of days earlier and then a trip to the north east for the Gateshead Jazz Festival.

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For the London date the band is joined by singer Olivia Chaney, multi-instrumentalist Dave Maric, and vibist Jim Hart of Cloudmakers Trio. Phronesis are expected in the studio later in the year. Stephen Graham

Ivo Neame (top), Jasper Høiby (middle), and Anton Eger above

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Last week on Marlbank I wrote about Simon Spillett’s new album Square One and commented: “Spillett is a self confessed purist and recently this comment was attributed to him: ‘Jazz will only survive if people are exposed to the music in its purest form.’ Disputing that this thinking isn’t particularly helpful, “as it requires someone to step forward and presumably spell out what jazz purism is”, I went on to question the need for jazz in its purest form and suggested its historic hybrid nature, and broad international and stylistic appeal, mitigated against such an attitude that Spillett maintained. I also said: “You can draw a line back via pianist John Critchinson here to Ronnie Scott’s regular band, which Critch for many years was a member of, and long before that back to the Scott and Tubby Hayes co-led Jazz Couriers," and that Spillett’s quartet kept “the Hayes spirit well and truly alive" before going on to praise the “high standard" and “enjoyable nature" of the playing with its “unfettered drive from Clark Tracey who sounds as if he’s in his element.” There was a little speculation in the article, which you can read in full here, that Square One will stir debate and sure enough it has, with Simon Spillett himself getting in touch with his reaction. “I deliberately avoided any heavy Tubby Hayes connections on this album and yet what does the first reviewer pick up on? The point is, I don’t want to have to keep defending my right to play in a style that isn’t up at ‘da cutting edge, man’. I don’t really care what the critics think of my ‘approach’ as long as I’m playing as well as I can. I’m not consciously thinking of turning back the clock, restoring old values or of looking like I’m standing by Barnes bridge in 1962. You don’t have the luxury of that when you’re trying to make a living!” SG

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There’s art in entertainment, and entertainment in art: a truism often trotted out. But is there entertainment in artwork or artwork as entertainment? Mostly Other People Do The Killing’s Slippery Rock! (Hot Cup ****) says yes there is to the latter, and the band’s latest CD comes laden with a riot in garish graphics on the cover and inside, so if that’s your idea of entertainment then this is the album for you. Don the sunglasses before picking the album up, though. If you prefer your entertainment wrapped up in art then this album, the quartet’s fifth, is also for you. So far their output has left me a bit unmoved because despite the trappings it didn’t seem that adventurous even if the playing was always really full-on. For a while it also seemed to me that the band was all about Jon Irabagon’s saxophone pyrotechnics, which of course it’s not. Bassist Moppa Elliott writes the tunes on Slippery Rock but he’s pretty anonymous as the free jazz- and improv-friendly band, powered by the Seb Rochford-like agile drumming of Kevin Shea, plays as a band not as a wonky IKEA flatpack where everything is put together solo by solo and then falls apart creakingly after standing up for all of two fairly unconvincing seconds.

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Their song titles are fun, and Pennsylvania certainly has a bunch of irony-loving jazz ambassadors waiting for that call (and the state governor Tom Corbett could do worse than invite the band along next time he’s throwing a soirée although they could be washing their hair that night). The heirs apparent to John Lurie’s Lounge Lizards? A bit, with a strong resemblance to Led Bib as well. Peter Evans is a major voice on trumpet throughout making the band direction veer off on its own itinerary, though. Working together with the very listenable Irabagon on the episodic improv-laden sections on the ninth of the nine tunes, ‘Is Granny Spry?’, he shows his musical ideas are as box-fresh, and at least as sharp, as Leonardo Featherweight’s “lyrical” sleevenotes.
Stephen Graham
Mostly Other People Do The Killing, above. Slippery Rock! is out now

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The full Cheltenham Jazz Festival line-up for 2013 has just been announced, and it’s good to see Madeleine Peyroux back to the scene of earlier triumphs at the festival, although that was back in the Everyman theatre era of the festival. Now of course the festival is centred on the Montpellier area with a bespoke main arena and big top as core venues. Booking Laura Mvula (above) is a good idea as the gospel and soul-infused new star-in-the-making ought to attract a non-jazz audience who’ve seen her on TV, and yet whose sensibility is directly in keeping with the high artistic qualities of the festival, and the key spirit of jazz.

Other impressions: Marius Neset at the Parabola will be keenly followed. The Norwegian saxophonist’s new album Birds is astonishingly accomplished and shows artistic progression since Golden Xplosion which you would have thought would itself have been hard to beat. Georgie Fame at the Friday Night is Music Night Radio 2 broadcast show is a great nostalgic touch and builds on the reminder Georgie gave us last year of just how significant an artist he still is with his latest album Lost in a Lover’s Dream.

The Dave Douglas Quintet should be another strong draw for hardcore Cheltenham attendees, and it’s also a unique festival chance this year to catch Alex Wilson’s Mali trio and also find out what all the fuss about GoGo Penguin is if you haven’t heard them. If you have, you’ll probably still want to catch the north west band’s EST-derived sound at first hand.

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The Ravi Coltrane Quintet includes in its number pianist of the moment David Virelles (above), the Brooklyn-based Cuban who’s on Tomasz Stańko’s exquisite new Wisława double album and Chris Potter’s The Sirens. Rumour has it Virelles has inked a solo deal with ECM’s Manfred Eicher as well for his own record.

Gregory Porter is back for 2013, which is good news and he’s artist-in-residence this year, an inspired choice, and it’s to the festival’s credit that Cheltenham has booked Sons of Kemet, arguably the best new underground band on the London scene last year, and they’re still to issue their debut album although it was recorded in February.

The Reuben James Trio is, if you’re seeking brand new talent, well worth your time, James of course a young protégé of the late Abram Wilson. The pianist was on fine form in January at the 606 sitting in with Theo Jackson who’s also appearing at the fest in his case in duo with Nathaniel Facey.

Troyk-estra pick up where they left off at last year’s Jazzwise to the Power of 15 festival at Ronnie Scott’s, playing the Parabola, and one of the biggest events this year is sure to be an appearance by the classy Mike Gibbs Ensemble.

Gary Burton is always a popular visitor to the UK scene, and his presence in the grand old Gloucestershire spa town should augment the programme in the eyes of his many fans in the UK. Mike Stern and Bill Evans by complete contrast should blow away a few cobwebs with their gutsy jazz-rock come May.

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Claire Martin also brings her classic jazz vocal approach to the festival, and look out for Anglo-French collaboration Barbacana featuring Kit Downes and they also have an intriguingly abstract new album out this year. Cheltenham is experienced at bringing hip fairly unknown US players to the festival, and this year is no exception with the appearance scheduled of vibes player Jason Adasiewicz’s Sun Rooms. And as with the Laura Mvula booking it’s fitting that Lianne La Havas is on the bill, another one for the Jools Holland Later following. The double bill of Polar Bear (above) and Roller trio is a good idea joining the dots between old-young Britjazz and new-young Britjazz. And finally Van Morrison on the Monday, given that Born to Sing: No Plan B was a hit with the critics and top 10 success last year, is a fine way to bring the festival to a close. The Big Top should suit him to a T.

Stephen Graham
The Cheltenham Jazz Festival runs from 1-6 May. Tickets on sale from Monday 4 March.  The full line-up is at http://www.cheltenhamfestivals.com

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The jazz vocals scene has changed immeasurably since 2003, the big year that Jamie Cullum broke through with the million selling Twentysomething inspiring a tsunami of interest in the niche, and seeing singers such as Clare Teal, who actually ‘discovered’ Cullum in the first place, sign to a major label. A decade on Cullum, about to release his latest album in May, is still apparently tapping the scene for the Great American Songbook on Cole Porter’s ‘Love For Sale’ rumoured to be on the new album. But Cullum has moved on himself, and who would have thought a decade ago that he would have been covering Rihanna and The White Stripes? Answer no one. Purists would have been incredulous or would have intoned darkly “told you so”. Clare Teal on the other hand moved away from jazz quite a bit into the showbiz mainstream for a while as she switched labels, moving from one major to another, and developing her broadcasting career, but certainly on a recent hearing has moved back to her initial Ella Fitzgerald-influenced starting point. Working with the likes of talented retro-radical Jay Phelps has certainly paid dividends or maybe reminded her that jazz is her real strength and on her day no one has a finer classic female jazz singer’s voice rooted in swing in the UK than Teal. In terms of male crooning the scene has changed, and while no one could claim that Jamie Cullum sounds like Harry Connick any more (that’s how he started out) there are others who do. Anthony Strong, say, is beginning to make a name for himself in France and Germany, and interesting Mancunian Alexander Stewart has managed to inject his own personality, love of The Smiths, and more besides, into his idea of crooning.

Another singer who we’ll be hearing more about in the spring is Theo Jackson. The newly London-based singer has a distinctive style and unlike orthodox crooners is very hard to place. He’s not of the Rat Pack, and he’s not a Bublé-ite, which Stewart to a certain extent is, but places himself more inside the band not just because he plays the piano but inserts his vocals in settings that relate to the saxophone lines of Nathaniel Facey, the Empirical co-founder who recently won instrumentalist of the year at the Jazz FM awards. Jackson writes his own songs, and last year released a promising debut album called Jericho that nonetheless failed to achieve a huge impact. Now with imaginative management, above all talent, and a determination to break through Jackson is embarking on his first big tour. The 27-year-old Durham university music graduate is hardly wet behind the ears, and his tall confident demeanour makes the right statement in a jazz club. He’s not toe-curlingly schmaltzy, like some wannabe jazz singers tend to be, and you feel that he doesn’t take himself too seriously even if that’s the way he prefers his music. Live it all starts on 5 May at the Cheltenham Jazz Festival as a duo with Nathaniel Facey playing original tunes and Duke Ellington, John Coltrane, Charlie Parker and Eric Dolphy material, and continues usually as a vocals-piano trio with Jackson joined by bassist Shane Allessio and drummer Jason Reeve. Dates are 606, London (8 May); Soundcellar, Poole (9 May); Stables, Wavendon (14 May); Chapel Arts, Bath (18 May); Pizza Express, Maidstone (24 May); Jam Factory, Oxford (26 May); Dean Clough, Halifax (30 May); Matt and Phred’s, Manchester (31 May); and Tom Thumb Theatre, Margate (6, 8 June). SG

Too cool just to croon: Theo Jackson, above

Charles Lloyd/Jason Moran
Hagar’s Song
ECM ****
Sometimes with instrumental jazz it’s like non-fiction: the facts, the history, the issues all there contained in the music in the notes on the page. The vocals variety can be the fiction, the metaphors, the fantasies, the reimaginings. The characters portrayed. Only rarely, and usually it’s only in the work of a truly great instrumentalist, the kind who can move you, make you even not think about music but of life itself, that can produce in their art a synthesis of the two so that as tactile notes with their musicological resources it exists, but equally beyond there is a life force that summons some sort of imagined life, a world away from reality.

Well, Charles Lloyd is one of those artists, he combines in his non-fictive way as an instrumentalist the fictive properties inherent in Ellingtonia (Strayhorn’s ‘Pretty Girl’ and Duke’s ‘Mood Indigo’), with the narrative shockingly real family history in the five-part ‘Hagar Suite’ about Lloyd’s great-great-grandmother taken from her parents at just 10 and sold to a slaveowner who made her pregnant when she was only 14.

Lloyd, a deeply serious spiritual artist with a great communicator’s ability, is able to paint pictures like few others in jazz. Via flute on ‘Journey Up River’, the first part of the ‘Hagar Suite’, he provides with pianist Moran’s tumbling accompaniment (and later tambourine) an episodic element not often found in his general approach, a feature throughout the suite that provides a distinctive thread to this album.

Turning 75 this year it’s interesting that Lloyd has chosen with this new studio album, recorded last April, to reduce his quartet to a duo, its simplicity via the time machine of piano styles that Moran provides, in the fictive sense invoking a line in jazz piano almost taking the listener, say on Moran’s introduction to ‘Mood Indigo’, to Harlem in the 1930s. Lloyd is very bluesy on some tracks, but he’s capable of altering the mood throughout and the blues become a miniature requiem on one notable standout ‘I Shall Be Released’, a tribute to Levon Helm of The Band.

A great deal of the strengths on Hagar’s Song reside in the force of sheer feeling involved that act as much as a warning from the past as a hymn to the dead. Just as ‘I Shall Be Released’ is about protest it’s also about friendship. So all in all a very personal, wonderful sounding album, full of lovely moments, an oasis of contemplation in a world full of tumult, and every bit as good as the marvellous Mirror.
Stephen Graham
Released on 18 February. Side by side: Charles Lloyd top and with Jason Moran above

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Saturday nights for jazz at Kings Place are quite subdued usually, and last night’s small but appreciative audience for the Hans Koller Ensemble was no exception, although the concertgoers showed their enthusiasm in a typically polite way. Hall two, or “The Base” as it’s known, I suppose to sound a bit more down-with-da-kids although looking around it was probably a case of down-with-da-grandkids, has great sightlines and a certain unclaustrophobic intimacy. But the somewhat mature audience certainly had the wisdom to turn up to hear the highly rated Hans Koller Ensemble, which a wider audience will catch when it’s broadcast on Radio 3’s Monday night show Jazz on 3 later this month. British-based German born composer, arranger, valve trombonist and pianist Koller, only in his forties, so a relative babe-in-arms compared to his great hero Mike Gibbs who he’s been working with recently in the studio, was best I thought in the first half as the Gil Evans cool school material suited the band better than the more tricksy vocal settings of poetry in German by Friedrich Hölderlin in the second. Singer Christine Tobin did her best but the overly intricate arrangements were a barrier to spontaneity and the band looked as if they were facing an uphill task. The sound mix also was a bit lopsided in the hall and did the vocals no favours but on radio it will come off differently. Koller spoke too much to the audience (he himself sensed this as he smilingly, but a bit geekily, nattered away to the audience), but of the soloists US alto saxophonist John O’Gallagher was expressive and interesting to listen to with hints of Lee Konitz here and there in his sound and his own conversational tone. Phil Robson’s sure footed harmonic grasp was always important, and it was the first opportunity to hear him in tandem with erstwhile Tomasz Stańko guitarist Jako Bro, from Denmark, whose contribution took a while to come but whose janglingly abstract style meshed well with Robson. Best moment of the evening? Definitely the band’s reading of ‘Temporarily’ an extra track that appeared on the reissue of the Jimmy Giuffre 3 Verve album Thesis, renamed 1961 when ECM reissued it. Percy Pursglove had some excellent flugelhorn runs in the second half, and gave firm direction to count in the other reeds and horns when tricky unisons where needed in the later part of the concert. Jeff Williams showed discretion and taste on drums throughout, very reminiscent of the late Paul Motian’s approach, and Koller made subtle use of Jim Rattigan on French horn in the ensemble passages, with his velvety tone peeking out in just the right spots. It might well be a case of back to the drawing board for the Hölderlin material, though: a tweak here and there might make it less doleful and heighten that latent quality with suitable contrasts.

Stephen Graham

Hans Koller, above

25/05/18 last updated