Roma cover

Enrico Rava turned 80 back in the summer. Roma was recorded at the Auditorium Parco della Musica in Rome last November. Lovano this year in his own projects has been touring with Trio Tapestry his avant band that he spearheads with Marilyn Crispell and Carmen Castaldi as fellow countercultural ambassadors. Together on Roma Enrico and Joe create a melancholic, philosophical sound: the Italian trumpet master adventurous and brave his beautiful tone whether on trumpet or flugel undiminished in no significant way by the ravages of living. An interior vision throughout the joy of the album is contained especially on the medley beginning with ‘Drum Song’ a piece by Lovano that seques into ‘Spiritual’ by  John Coltrane and then the Harold Arlen standard ‘Over The Rainbow’. In this symphony of soaring spirits every element of this excellent live album is present. The fire inside burns and creates, the circle of life expressed and distilled to its very core. 

Out now 

 

Falling a month before the anniversary is marked of the release 60 years ago of Time Out, Dave Brubeck’s Time Out by Stephen A. Crist arrives as the first of two new Brubeck themed books. 

To be issued in the Oxford Studies in Recorded Jazz series the Crist book is described by its publisher as “the first full-length study of Time Out, providing an insider’s look at Brubeck's life and work”. The author is a professor of music history at Atlanta’s Emory University and who according to his university biography works largely in European music of the sixteenth through to the eighteenth centuries, with additional interests in hymnody and jazz. 

Interest in Brubeck also extends to a second book, a so-called “investigative biography” and titled Dave Brubeck: A Life in Time by UK based music journalist Philip Clark which is to be published in February next year.

Publisher Da Capo describes the Clark book as based on the access to Brubeck that the author gained during a Brubeck tour 16 years ago. “Structured around Clark’s extended interview and intensive new research,” Da Capo goes on to claim that “A Life in Time tells one of the last untold stories of jazz, unearthing the secret history of ‘Take Five’ and many hitherto unknown aspects of Brubeck’s early career.” 

Tcha Limberger

Directed by Dolma’s Daughters film maker Ádám Miklós and written by the London based Hungarian Yvonne Bauer A Magyar Nóta: Belga Mestere literally Belgian Master of Hungarian Song is a truly remarkable and quite moving insight about the music and life of the extraordinary violinist Tcha Limberger, a blind violin virtuoso from Belgium who discovers traditional Hungarian music and moves to Hungary to master it. Limberger fell in love with the long forgotten Hungarian nóta style and made it his mission to introduce it to the world. The film makers ask the questions why does he want to learn a music genre that has almost been forgotten by Hungarians; and why does he leave the security of his Belgian home to live in a Transylvanian village?

Shot in Hungary, Transylvania and Belgium the sound quality is excellent and the Transylvanian scenes are especially very beautifully filmed, the quality of the light is stunning: a scene towards the end of the film has a gathering of fiddlers that is epic and life affirming. Responding to marlbank’s comment that Limberger is up there with Roby Lakatos no less, writer Yvonne Bauer says: “Roby Lakatos himself is of the best opinion on Tcha! He said that Tcha follows in the footsteps of the great old masters in that he plays according to the most ancient rules, which few other musicians do these days. All of them try to sound more modern, just like Roby himself.” 
Tcha Limberger appears at Le Quecumbar in London on 2 November.

Mark, heading down the 606 to hear a 13-piece do some 5/4s  this lunchtime – meet you around seven minutes past one after I jump off the 319?” 

“Don’t mind if I do, big Suze.

Readers love a good trio – we salute you and echo that emotion. Most jazz fans are the very same and like a small outfit, “small” as in 9 and under – that is: The quintet or sextet is a perfection just as much as the trio. Think Kind of Blue. Subtract, peel away, to just the one, ah get you... Köln Concert. Numbers... yep we are comfortably numb to as many or as few. The notion that a number is what counts is however absurd.

It only begins when you listen... to the rock ’n’ roll of Santo & Johnny

 

French news agencies are reporting that the earliest known TV footage of Miles Davis to survive has been located in France. According to reports the institut national de l’audiovisuel (INA) says it found the material.

In monochrome the footage dates to a 25 December 1957 broadcast although the filming was made 18 days earlier on 7 December.

Three minutes and 50 seconds in duration approximately, above, it relates to the Lift to the Scaffold period and was found during an inventory. Miles was in France to work for the director Louis Malle on the film known in French as Ascenseur pour l’échafaud. It shows a quintet of players. Subject to verification this looks like Miles Davis, trumpet; Barney Wilen, tenor sax; René Urtreger, piano; Pierre Michelot, bass; Kenny Clarke, drums.

  

Look for Ballades this month. Meanwhile go back to listen to a Billy Reid song Jamal breathed new instrumental life into on Blue Moon.

Listen closely to the percussive ocean contributed by Weather Report legend long time Ahmadian, Manolo Badrena. The magic starts meshing with Herlin Riley like brothers from around 25 seconds in. Puerto Rican Badrena played tambourine on ‘Birdland’ (click to listen) ffs no less.

Jamal’s part, the changes towards the end say from the governor at 3mins 30secs on especially are beautiful. Above: first sung and as ‘The Gipsy’ so rendered brand new in a lilting 1945 treatment by Dorothy Squires.

Touring in the States next month ‘Time-Lapse City’ is from the GoGo Penguin upcoming EP Ocean in a Drop: Music for Film to be released to chime with their Texas and California dates. Inspired by Koyaanisqatsi, the Mancs perform the soundtrack live to the film in LA (8 October) and San Fran (9).

OK, the new regular “not jazz” but staggering listening nevertheless. Yep, the one that everyone is talking about, Norman Fucking Rockwell by Lana Del Rey. A little hush please. Best line, actually best word perhaps in the whole caboodle — the way she inflects the first of these “Hello, it’s the most famous woman you know on the iPad.” Spooky or what.

The Tomorrow’s Warriors #IAmWarrior fundraising drive has been successful.

A whopping £119,743 has been raised. The target was £100,000.

Thanking those who donated, the Tomorrow’s Warriors website features a message explaining:

“We have secured match funding of £100,000 from Arts Council England to pay for the resources needed to continue delivering an exciting, year-round comprehensive learning and training programme for our young musicians, helping us to transform young lives...

“Our students, parents, staff and wonderful supporters can stop and take a deep breath, safe in the knowledge that the immediate threat to our programme has been lifted and we can now put all our energies into securing long-term funding for our Young Artist Development Programme.”

The initiative was launched in the autumn of 2018. 

 

TRACK OF THE WEEK  #NewMusicFriday Tremendously swinging agility from the piano master Chick Corea on Monk’s ‘Work’ drawn from Trilogy 2 (to be released on 4 October) only a few months after Antidote. This is quite different and the continuation of a story begun to be told. Such open interplay throughout. A conversation between protagonists all – delivering crucially individually and collectively in the moment.

Superstar trio, the Pettifordian bass matador Christian McBride and the great Wayne Shorter drummer Brian Blade join Chick: this new Concord issued double album arrives six years on from the initial double Grammy winning Trilogy release.

Live, recorded on tour Corea’s ‘500 Miles High’ from Return to Forever album Light as a Feather is included among the mix of standards and originals that also spans Corea all time classic ‘La Fiesta’. In press material Chick is quoted as saying on his arrangement of Stevie Wonder’s ‘Pastime Paradise’ from Songs in the Key of Life: “I’ve been friends with Stevie since he used to come around to listen to Return to Forever in 1973 at The Bitter End. A few years ago Stevie sat in with us at Catalina’s in Los Angeles and we went out to dinner afterwards. We were talking about songs and I was using the term ‘standards,’ and Stevie turned to me and said, ‘Hey Chick, what do you think about playing some new standards?’ I thought that was interesting and asked, ‘What do you mean?’ And he said, ‘You know – my music!’ He was kind of kidding around, but not completely, and I thought that was a great idea.” Full track listing: Disc 1: How Deep Is the Ocean, 500 Miles High, Crepuscule with Nellie, Work, But Beautiful, La Fiesta.  Disc 2: Eiderdown, All Blues, Pastime Paradise, Now He Sings, Now He Sobs, Serenity, Lotus Blossom.

Back in the summertime release Chick on the superb Antidote revisited songs from his albums My Spanish Heart and Touchstone with a multi-cultural octet, sprinkling in a few new compositions and guest appearances by vocalists Rubén Blades, Chick’s wife Gayle Moran Corea, and Maria Bianca, a reminder once again how important it is to listen and learn from the masters of the music. Trilogy 2 continues that significant, immersive, process. 

Philos came out earlier this year to deserved acclaim. Park Jiha performs her tunes solo by looping and layering abstract lines played on the Korean instruments the piri, which is sort of a bamboo oboe, double reed mouth organ the saenghwang; and on yanggeum – a metal-stringed hammered dulcimer.

She plays Rich Mix during the K Music festival on 17 October.

Parting is beauty’s creation./Parting’s beauty is not in the substanceless gold of morning nor in the woofless black silk of night nor in deathless immortal life,/nor is it in the unfading blue flower of heaven./Love, if it were not for parting I would not be able to live again in a/smile having once died in tears. Oh, parting./Beauty is parting’s creation. (Manhae) 

Find yourself – in E1. Tickets

 

O lapwing thou fliest around the heath

Nor seest the net that is spread beneath

Why dost thou not fly among the corn fields

They cannot spread nets where a harvest yields

 William Blake 

 

archive

We looked up 6 jazz blogs so you don’t have to or think about Boorish Wanton. If you must regarding the latter somehow the soundtrack of classic Sex Pistols Never Mind the Bollocks Here’s the Sex Pistols seems apt as a suggestion. “The record bristles with exhilarating negation – no feelings, no future – and the pull of abjection,” notes Matthew Worley: professor of modern history at the University of Reading. Otherwise the new doom epic from Sunn O))) Pyroclasts will do. Topicality even out of context is all, huh? As for the former at the outset scroll down for a few jazz jottings.  

  

Music and More have reviewed Live at Newport Jazz “a very entertaining concert”... the blog jazz.org is still on holiday but back in August they were rounding up September...  John Fordham says in londonjazznews.com that Vijay “Iyer has revealed himself to be an audacious original... the librarians in Darmstadt have taken a break from stacking shelves and have been blogging too and alert us to a Wiener Zeitung interview with Maceo Parker... Who in the 1950s “swished between jazz and R&B”? Jazzwax has an inkling... Talk about, finally, an ode to a Norwegian strobe, yep Nextbop have the scoop and check out Michael Janisch live. 

If you are looking for a uniquely plaintive quality in trumpet quest no further than ‘Why Should There Be Stars’ the runaway success among all these very tasteful tracks.

Roney has delivered one of his best albums in a long while and yet... sometimes a three-star album which this is nonetheless is more than enough and yet frustrating.

While it is not going to change the world it may just change your day. You can feel the limits: but maybe great artistry (and Roney has shown that for many years) is about knowing what you can do and doing it. The rest is just conversation.

Roney needs a new producer like someone who would argue with him and he would accept the word! 

Anyway Blue Dawn Blue Nights however is very poignant, there is a lot of personal sadness to reflect, and often it is quite moving.

Listen you need to be able to work out that you are coming to Roney for a subtle musical personality whose sound lands at the heart of modal Milesian jazz. After all he quite comfortably fell into the Milesian world at first hand and stood in for Miles towards the end of the Picasso of Cool’s life.

Roney has made approaching a couple of dozen records. Quite a few blur into one and yet you know exactly why you listen to him and go to hear him live. Last time I saw him it was slightly bizarre: who wears sunglasses inside anyway when the stage lights are not even that bright! And yet I for one did not want to go home.

There is a Roney world. His persona invades you. A club player not a big hall player ideally even if most musicians want to play to the biggest audiences imaginable for good career reasons it is not always ideal for most and Roney needs you to be there in a space where people do not get lost in themselves and the architecture. 

Here with an accomplished if necessarily anonymous band, saxophonist Emilio Modeste, pianist Oscar Williams II, bassist Paul Cuffari, and his teenage nephew, certainly a talent drummer Kojo Odu Roney + cameos from guitarist Quintin Zoto and the great Lenny White. Recorded at Rudy Van Gelder’s studio in New Jersey it sounds right from an engineering point of view. Roney soars.  SG

The Like Water For Chocolate hip-hop great returns with Let Love (Loma Vista *****). A thrill it arrives three years on from Black America Again. Tracks are: 
1 Good Morning Love featuring Samora Pinderhughes
2 HER Love feat. Daniel Caesar, Dwele
3 Dwele’s Interlude
4 Hercules feat. Swizz Beatz
5 Fifth Story feat. Leikeli47
6 Forever Your Love feat. BJ The Chicago Kid
7 Leaders (Crib Love) feat. A-Trak
8 Memories Of Home feat. BJ The Chicago Kid, Samora Pinderhughes
9 Show Me That You Love feat. Jill Scott, Samora Pinderhughes
10 My Fancy Free Future Love
11 God Is Love feat. Jonathan McReynolds, Leon Bridges

Look for The Silver Messengers from which ‘Soul Searching’ is drawn by Carmen Souza on Galileo in October.

Supermario artworkA very invigorating one this, the Babel label currently on a Loredana roll after a long hiatus following the departure to pastures new of label lieutenant, the affable Ozymandias reciting Paul Lewis.

Paulo Dias Duarte is a Portuguese composer and guitarist on the London scene for over a decade and a half. The orchestra has included an extraordinary array of top talent coming up. A bit of detective work has gone into this review so forgive the deerstalker quality. However, hey look there is the cover above and a word from Paulo.

So how does it begin? Deduce lots of twiddly guitar texture on the Intro and thereafter a veritable “seven part suite” the tracks no kidding Sherlock are numbered one to seven. More to the point each piece relates unlike a lot of albums where tracks live in their own Siberia and never melt even when there is a Gobi desert next door.

The word suite by the way is not mentioned. That is a blessing. For a brief minute the flavour is Beefheart-esque and then we are into electric guitar and a chunky Mingus-like vamp.

Muscular drums, anarchic horns, parping offbeats are all in the capacious larder. There is lots of gritty section work (eg on Part IV) and earlier Part II (coming up from the bass more Mingusiana mixed with that Chris Batchelor-esque flavour harking back to Loose Tubes initial listens conjured up). Flashingly cosmic keyboard part on this track, the arranging overall is extremely good. How you can sound free and yet write that freedom for a decent sized bunch of musicians and let them be themselves is achieved rewards plenty of head scratching.

A major new outfit, we have not had a big band such as this gathering since say the F-IRE Collective in their prime. Part III is like the ballad: certainly at the beginning, Duarte does not do plangent but here it is as close as makes no difference: An afternoon feel like a sort of anarchist holiday, bit of improving reading before the return to the protest and spot of rioting later in the improvisation.

Streaming on Spotify

Not jazz. Just a regular spot way out there to finish the day whenever possible. Outlaw country for a change 21st century style. Amazing stuff here from the Highwomen. Until next time.

From VII to be released on Ropeadope later this month by Chicago titan Ramsey Lewis and Urban Knights. Groovy, elastic, effortlessly seeming, full of detail, neat Harper Lee literary pun perhaps, in the title of the track and crucially not too smooth... Lewis of course world renowned for The In Crowd recorded in the Bohemian Caverns 54 years ago. Very tasteful press roll themed drum solo from Charles Heath beginning at the 4 minute mark worth clocking and Heath is the hearth of the matter burning from the beginning. Essential. Lewis’ main theme, that thing he does at 1min and 21secs is a marvel – the surprise and gleam of instant sunshine and then a full on blissed out pitch bent like a rubber band synth solo from Tim (Daddy O) Gant to wig out to. 

Worth £5,000 to the winner and a further £5,000 split between 3 more successful participants details about the long running Peter Whittingham award this year are now available. According to the official word from Help Musicians the “Jazz musicians, either solo or in groups of up to eight, who are at a tipping point in their career, are invited to apply via the website here by Monday October 14.” 
Auditions will be held in November. 

 

WorldService Project bass guitarist Arthur O’Hara with tenorist Chelsea Carmichael and WSP drummer Harry Pope are appearing at the Lancaster jazz festival this month. Dates are 11-15 September. Camilla George, Led Bib, Vula Viel also are worth turning up to if in the area and about a bit. Do you have to let it linger? That is a yes by the way if at all feasible.

Dates are Sounds From a Safe Harbour, Cork 14 September and Purcell Room, 27 September, London. From The Gloaming Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh and Thomas Bartlett’s self-titled album is released on the eve of the Cork gig. 

Fuse number 11 cover

Must be the clouds in my eyes: Blowing in from Stockholm and after compilation So Far dropped earlier in the year not a lot to go on about what is next from the Daniel Karlsson trio but first of all the label behind the 11 October release of Fuse Number Eleven will once again be Brus & Knaster. They have already put out the splendidly titled game changer of a live affair At The Feel Free Falafel which already has reached cult status among the less insane scene watchers in the coterie of global piano jazz trio worshippers out there – and understandably so

As for the Coventry gig mentioned above it will be at Earlsdon Street spot the Albany Club on 7 November. Details. Their brief English and Scottish three-date tour will also take in Oswestry and Glasgow (appearing at the Blue Arrow).

Coventry of course is a brilliant if tough town for music and yet suffers so much through history. Marlbank misses the Coventry jazz festival which used to take place in venues such as the Belgrade theatre there and where once we managed to hear Randy Brecker (and have not repeated that feat unfortunately given Randy’s lack of heavy touring here since). The Specials came from the midlands city and immortalised what locals lovingly refer to as Cov during Thatcher’s ruinous years when she took a wrecking ball to industrial Britain and in ‘Ghost Town’ inspired the downtrodden and dispossessed everywhere. 

Daniel Karlsson trio

The lead track of the new Daniel Karlsson trio album is ‘Fuse Number Eleven’. Recall the trio from last year, cast your mind back regular readers. Briefly marlbank dropped in to Soho spot the basement situated Spice kindly admitted by the venue’s in house conjurer Jackie Docherty and club guiding light occasional singer Paul Pace. Pianist Daniel Karlsson was with bassist Christian Spering and his faithful long time comrade drummer Fredrik Rundqvist. Monster ostinatos whether eating from the pianist’s left hand or out of the blue from the bass tumbled from the sky. Look for the trio this autumn. You will not regret it. 

Legendary jazz singer Elaine Delmar, daughter of Leslie “Jiver” Hutchinson, is a headliner at the Lowestoft jazz festival in Suffolk this month. She appears as featured artist in the quartet of pianist Barry Green, an aggregation that also numbers a second great – the Glaswegian Jim Mullen. Soft Machine are also in the weekend line-up. 12-15 September. Full details.

The Ambiguity Manifesto by the Taylor Ho Bynum 9-tette is to be released by his label Firehouse 12 Records on 20 September. Analysis in brief, electroacoustic textures: Starting point as a reset away from anything that you might be playing listen to a little of Evan Parker’s Toward the Margins say via Shazam samples switch off and then listen to the example track. You can feel a kindred aesthetic. However Bynum has possibly more affinity to the later more recent avant side of Alex Bonney. Click for a little there in that regard. He I would guess has been influenced by Ho Bynum. Finally this is tonal adventure, a gradation of texture, metre erased in the shavings and shaping of an acoustic canopy.

 

The great percussionist Marilyn Mazur is the big highlight of Sounds of Denmark this autumn headlining on the Saturday night appearing as a featured artist in the trio of pianist Makiko Hirabayashi.

Mazur became hugely loved for her work with Miles Davis in one of the East St Louis great’s best late period bands and who would later excel in the classic Garbarek quartet along with the iconic Norwegian-Polish leader Euro great Jan G., Rainer Brüninghaus and Eberhard Weber in the 1990s in addition to leading her own groups.

Taking place from 16-19 October also scheduled for Sounds of Denmark among the line-up are Morten Schantz Godspeed and Hess is More. Tickets and full line-up.

Not jazz at all — what a voice and what Dermot Kennedy does with it more to the heart of the matter on ‘Outnumbered’. Ultimate friendship song this year, a comfort, protection, and battle against male inarticulacy part of the magic. All about communication, person to person, huh, isn’t that what a great song however unembellished and written plainly and with not an awful lot of key changes is all about? Out of nowhere seemingly and now pretty much living in any public place quite naturally, Starrrt and parrrt as you listen after a fairly ordinary beginning have been incredibly captured and almost signpost the transformation and move the thing to a new level entirely. Any Maverick Sabre fans out there? You probably will get this if you are at least a bit. The power in the 27-year-old man from Rathcoole, south county Dublin, is staggering. And yet songwriters will be in awe of this given its vulnerability somehow unlocked by I’ll be out there somewhere and then the outro. Forget about the remixes. Without Fear the album is to be released in late-September. You will be hearing ‘Outnumbered’ and that voice long before you know anything at all about it. The song will be taking plenty of hostages in its wake. Other songs rendered by Kennedy, from the approaching thunder of ‘Power Over Me’ the moving ‘For Island Fires and Family’ (instant classic there, pretty deep overall) and ‘Lost’ inspire in equal measure. Sometimes songs just ring in the air and these all do whatever your taste. SG

Hidden Seas will be released in late-September, the Leeds date among other touring is on 24 October. Last on our radar when trombone player Rosie Turton emerged with an EP Maria Chiara Argirò is a pianist and shoots to the top of the marlbank list of brand new pretty unknown pianists really impressing as a composer particularly this year thinking back to the earlier tracks and relistening prompted by this new work. The singer in her group is Leïla Martial and again makes her presence felt (the style lands in an experimental Gretchen Parlato vein but less sunny side up). The band sound very in the moment on this albeit slim evidence so far. Look out for the rest of the album: marlbank will be joining you if you do round about then. Leeds gig details

Naked Allies

“Last summer,” writes drummer composer bandleader Matthew Jacobson, “Irish-Australian saxophonist Daniel Rorke organised a recording session with myself, Oscar Noriega and Simon Jermyn at Figure 8 Recording in New York, playing tunes of Daniel’s and mine.

“It came out real nice and it is getting released on LA-based Orenda Records on 20 September.”


Orenda add: “Daniel Rorke has lived and worked in Ireland, Iceland, Australia, Norway, and toured throughout the world.

His performance career has included work with many well known Nordic musicians such as Hilmar Jensson, Per Oddvar Johansen, Rune Nergaard, Veli Kujala, Samúel Jon Samúelsson, Sigtryggur Baldursson, Australian piano giant Alister Spence and many others.” 

Matthew Jacobson, top left-to-right, Daniel Rorke, Simon Jermyn, Oscar Noriega. Listen to the title track above via Bandcamp. 

Worth getting to know for sure.