Saturday lunchtime is an unusual and quite brave time for an album launch that didn’t nonetheless affect Cloudmakers Trio too much despite the modest turn-out at the Pizza Express Jazz Club in London yesterday. Kicking off with ‘Snaggletooth’ “dedicated to the noble art of British dentistry", quipped vibes player Jim Hart above, the band were performing material from new album Live at the Pizza recorded on the very spot here with Ivo Neame octet drummer Dave Hamblett deputising for Cloudmakers sticksman Dave Smith who is touring South America with Robert Plant, Hart patiently informed the audience, the latter mainly quietly intent on munching pizza in the darkness of the Dean Street basement reserving their applause for later. Fresh over on the train from Paris in the morning the trio were joined by alto saxophonist Antonin Tri Hoang (it’s trumpeter Ralph Alessi on the album) whose tone and general style at times resembled the approach of a master like Lee Konitz, and who excelled particularly on Monk’s ‘Bye Ya’ in the first set, and in the second on the bebop pioneer’s ‘Epistrophy’ with Hart explaining that everyone on stage were keen appreciators of Monk. The original material complemented the original inclinations of bebop to some extent with a vertical harmonic orientation that revelled in keenly carved out structure and strong momentum, the confidently insistent bass lines of Janisch and idiomatic drumming from Hamblett maintaining sustained interest, despite this being Hamblett’s first live performance of the material. Must have been a bit of a roast! You may have heard both Hart and Hamblett on Ivo Neame’s superlative octet release Yatra recently. ‘Social Assassin’, dedicated to Curb Your Enthusiasm creator Larry David, was an exuberant way to open the second set, and later ‘Passwords’, from the album, was the pick of the original material, a very fine composition for a variety of reasons, particularly the shape of the piece and the fact that the band produced some spontaneous polyrhythmic lift-off, in other words, whether it was the intention or not the tune swung. I also liked the avant garde ‘Post Stone’, named after a night at John Zorn’s New York downtown venue The Stone. Maybe Saturday afternoon gigs need to catch on a bit more to gain the extra bums on seats, but Cloudmakers are worth catching live on any day of the week even in the afternoon.

Stephen Graham

A film and its soundtrack, they go together; or do they? It’s not always obvious and I’m talking about the continuity dialogue-and-music version, not the music-only separately issued one. It’s all about context, stating the obvious, choice; and above all the interpretative ability of the composer and the allied decisions to use song-based or instrumental material that already exists that can amplify the story. In Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master the director is reunited with film composer Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood, following their previous work together on There Will Be Blood.

The music that Greenwood didn’t compose reflects the film’s period setting to an extent, and it has a jazz-tinged and popular music quality to it, relating to the 1940s following victory in Japan, the beginning of a new era as traumatised navy veteran Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) becomes part of The Cause, the cultish Scientology-like group led by charismatic Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman, above). Greenwood’s music harnesses electronic textures via acoustic means and dense harmonic strings-laden clusters that particularly in the second half of the film, past the one-hour mark, uses clarinet a great deal. Some of the instrumentalists on the score, released by Nonesuch records on 5 November, are jazz people including former Humphrey Lyttelton sideman the veteran mainstream musician Jimmy Hastings, and a voice of the new generation, Sons of Kemet clarinettist Shabaka Hutchings, along with Zed-U bandmates Neil Charles and Tom Skinner.

The key non-Greenwood music comes in three main varieties each with particular justifications in terms of plot and context.

The first is the inclusion of the Ella Fitzgerald version of the Irving Berlin song ‘Get Thee Behind Me Satan’, chosen I suppose for its playful hint of menace and played against a show of photographs.

The second is ‘No Other Love’ (the spooky song that owes much to Chopin’s ‘Tristesse’) sung by Jo Stafford, which belongs to the Arizona section of the film where the Master finds himself, in Phoenix, addressing the first congress of The Cause. While impactful it retains a non-literal ambivalence in terms of narrative.

And finally the third song is Helen Forrest’s version of ‘Changing Partners’ in waltz time accompanied by the Sy Oliver orchestra (think the feel of ‘Tennessee Waltz’ a tune that Sonny Rollins interpreted in its definitive jazz treatment). This last song charts the ultimate choice of Freddie after his final dealing with Dodd in his mansion in England where the action moves to after some wanderings in America and quite some time after the seafaring episodes in the early part of the film.

The Greenwood soundtrack itself in the context of the film, leaving aside the songs referred to, and they are important, has a great deal of depth and an abstract logic to it unlike much modern cinema composition that relies on mood-setting minimalism as a jumping off point, or anthemic electronica even no matter the period. Texturally Greenwood’s approach adds gravitas and provides parallel, although properly allusive, commentary on the drama. It also never distracts and integrates itself organically. The Master is absorbing, stimulating, a quite brilliant piece of film-making and thought-provoking storytelling, beautifully acted and shot. It’s a film that people will, hazarding a wild guess, be talking about for a long time to come. Stephen Graham

In cinemas from Friday

With over 110 people on the stage of the Queen Elizabeth Hall in London last night the Jazz Jamaica All Stars, Urban Soul Orchestra and Voicelab with special guest Brinsley Forde celebrated 50 years of Jamaican independence in some style with a themed concert based on Bob Marley and the Wailers’ 1973 classic album Catch a Fire.

Forde, pictured above right, who with ASWAD had significant chart success with songs such as ‘Don’t Turn Around’ going to number one in the charts in 1988, and ‘Shine’, was the front man of the evening standing wearing a leather jacket and sporting a baseball cap with a guitar loosely slung over his shoulder.

Behind him to his right were the Urban Soul Orchestra an eight piece strings section led by violinist Stephen Hussey, while immediately behind Forde at the back of the stage Jazz Jamaica’s bandleader Gary Crosby OBE was beefing up his double bass reggae style to suit the occasion. The bass lines were extra fat, extra juicy, the reggae beat of guitarist Robin Banerjee and propulsive drums of Rod Youngs lovingly honed, and percussionist Pete Eckford was clearly raring to go from the start, fine and choppy on congas.

Not all the songs performed were from Catch a Fire but they formed the main strand of the musical programme, including album opener ‘Concrete Jungle’, ‘Slave Driver’, ‘400 Years’, ‘Stop That Train’, ‘Baby We’ve Got a Date’, and ‘Stir It up’, the latter opening the second set with a great string arrangement involving the fiddling duo of violinist Miles Brett and Stephen Hussey. ‘Kinky Reggae’, and the formidable ‘No More Trouble’ were also performed from Catch a Fire (only ‘Midnight Ravers’ was absent), and other Marley classics featured included ‘Redemption Song’ and ‘One Love’ from Exodus for good measure.

All the arrangements were by alto saxophonist Jason Yarde who was part of a strong sax section that included newcomer baritone saxophonist Teresina Morra, whose solo early on acted as a marker for an exciting new name of note to watch out for. Harry Brown in the trombone section was as listenable as ever, and notable trumpet solos were taken by Yazz Ahmed and James McKay.

Forde was uniformly excellent, with great stage presence and a mellifluously persuasive voice, particularly on ‘Stop That Train’, ‘400 Years’ and ‘Redemption Song’, and the South Bank Centre choir Voice Lab directed by Mark De-Lisser went down a storm in the second set with their spirited sense of involvement. The audience got on to their feet and it all felt so natural. Earlier the vocal torch was carried under their own pared down auspices by the All Stars’ backing singers who Crosby dubbed “them three”, Jazz Jamaica’s own I-Threes: MOBO-nominated Zara McFarlane, Valerie Etienne and Rasiyah Jubari, whose harmonies and occasional ensemble-stealing moments were just great. Musical director and conductor Kevin Robinson’s trumpet solo at the end was also a classy touch. Hear this very fine presentation if you can before the tour ends next week, and you’ll lively up yourself for sure. Stephen Graham

Photos: Roger Thomas

The Lively Up festival tour continues on Friday night at Leeds Town Hall, followed by De Montfort Hall, Leicester, on 31 October, and reaches the Usher Hall, Edinburgh on 2 November