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Jazz guitar legend Martin Taylor is to pair up with the Chet Atkins-influenced fingerstyle guitar star Tommy Emmanuel for new album The Colonel and the Governor and the duo embark on a big UK and Irish tour during the month of release. Taylor who has jazz chops to burn can play most things and the album beginning with ‘I Won’t Last A Day Without You’ for the first few dozen bars could be in any style. Slowly but surely the jazz connotation comes through on the upbeat partially countrified song, but there are uncategorisable moments throughout the album and little blissful pleasures you wouldn’t want to hazard a guess at, such as the lovely ballad ‘Heat Wave’ redolent of an exile’s reverie. ‘Jersey Bounce’ could easily sit on one of those Woody Allen films long ago when an outside, slightly ambivalent, walking scene maybe involving Woody trying to avoid some girl friend or other would require a wry theme with a little pitch bending from Emanuel doing the trick and the trademark Taylor motion.

On ‘Bernie’s Tune’ (made famous by Gerry Mulligan in the 1950s) the musicians clearly let loose from the start with get-stuck-in laughs and a dash of gypsy jazz. Taylor whose Spirit of Django band brought gypsy jazz to a wide audience in the 1990s is in his element here, and for Emmanuel it’s to the manner born. Other tunes are ‘A Smooth One’, ‘True’, ‘Heat Wave’ referred to earlier, ‘One Day’, George Shearing’s ‘Lullaby of Birdland’ with a sort of double staircase scale-melting introduction as the guitarists ascend and descend to meet on the shared landing of the melody, ‘The Nearness of You’, ‘Down at Cocomos’, a favourite of Taylor’s with the lilting Caribbean melody a live mainstay for the leading UK jazz guitarist in recent years, ‘The Fair Haired Child’, ‘Secret Love’, a solo for Emmanuel, ‘Wonderful Baby’, and Billy Taylor’s ‘I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free’ finishing things off. Taylor and Emmanuel have known each other and played together since the 1990s. The tour begins in Belfast on 2 March at the Ulster Hall, continuing at the University Concert Hall, Limerick (3 March); Opera House, Cork (4 March, album release date); Helix Theatre, Dublin (5 March); Anvil, Basingstoke (6 March); Waterside Theatre, Aylesbury (7 March); Sage, Gateshead (8 March); Bridgewater Hall, Manchester (9 March); Robin 2, Wolverhampton (10 March); Queen’s Theatre, Barnstaple (12 March); Corn Exchange, Exeter (13 March); Colston Hall, Bristol (14 March); Shepherd’s Bush Empire, London (16 March); Leas Cliffe Hall, Folkestone (17 March); Hawth, Crawley (18 March); Corn Exchange, Ipswich (20 March); Winding Wheel, Chesterfield (21 March); Victoria Theatre, Halifax (22 March); Coronation Hall, Ulverston (24 March); Lemon Tree, Aberdeen (26 March); and Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh (28 March). SG

Tommy Emmanuel above left and Martin Taylor. Photo: Allen Clarke 

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Is there such a thing as a spoof piano trio? Well I guess there is but in irony-loving jazz circles [em], even in Dalston, would not qualify. The only thing ‘pretend’ about the trio on this showing was the German jazz piano trio’s fluently elegant take on Komeda’s music for Roman Polanski’s 1967 knockabout curiosity The Fearless Vampire Killers, the first song of the second set. What would bat connoisseur Professor Abronsius, in the film played by the great Beckettian actor Jack MacGowran, have made of it? Who knows, but aficionados of these small nocturnal mammals have a thing or two in common with jazz fans, 50 or so of whom were gathered last night (thankfully the right way up) in the Vortex for the return to the club of pianist Michael Wollny, bassist Eva Kruse, and drummer Eric Schaefer. Opening with two numbers from their 2006 album II, Schaefer’s ‘So Will Die Sonn’ Nun Untergehen’ and ‘Phelgma Phighter’, the band soon hit their stride with the long haired youthful-looking Wollny fleet of foot and luxuriously supple in his darting runs, while Kruse, who is expecting a baby, was smilingly attentive and supremely intuitive in her confidently startling harmonic counterblasts. ‘Dario’ from last year’s superb Wasted & Wanted, with Schaefer picking up a melodica at the beginning of the number, altered the focus of the set as it gained content and depth and Schaefer’s little touches on bells and scuffling industrial sounds as well as his ability to rock out added much to the beautiful, often sensuous, voicings that Wollny habitually creates. Their remarkable version of Schubert’s ‘Ihr Bild’ was even better than on the excellent album version. Wollny mused at the end that Kraftwerk were in town at Tate Modern before [em] launched into their intuitively recomposed version of ‘Das Modell’. A world away from the ritual of electronic music, [em] are streets ahead of anyone’s idea of a jazz trio and have just got to be heard. Stephen Graham