In a society that often reveres the ephemeral and mocks ideas or concepts that don’t conform to the norm of the day here’s something to cherish, something only an independent record company can produce these days, and something only people with a passion and determination can achieve when they set their minds to it.

It’s the reissue by Swedish record label Caprice of Don Cherry’s Organic Music Society on CD and handsome double vinyl, whose sonic pristine presence hovers over the sorry tattered mess of the major label reissue efforts of late like an avenging angel.

Cherry  by the end of the 1960s was living in Sweden with his wife Moki Karlsson and family, and collaborating with a range of Swedish players exploring what’s now called, uncomfortably to some because of its ‘coffee table’ connotations, world music. So in 1971 and 1972 Cherry got down the tracks for this double album which until this year apparently hadn’t appeared on CD. A few tracks ‘Elixir’ and ‘Relativity Suite’ were taped in a studio but the rest was live made on portable machines. Along with a range of leading Swedish players of the day including Bengt Berger, Christer Bothén, and Tommy Koverhult who sound just great alongside Cherry listen out for Turkish percussionist Okay Temiz, and even Nana Vasconcelos little known in Europe at the time. As well as playing pocket cornet Cherry sings and takes to a range of instruments including harmonium, flute and conch shell. Of the music there’s a version of Pharoah Sanders and Leon Thomas’ ‘The Creator has a Masterplan’, music by Dollar Brand as he then was, and the great minimalist Terry Riley with plenty more beside to savour. The sound hits you in the face. So if you get hold of a copy, take your time, kick back, it might just make your day.

Stephen Graham

The MOBO nominations are released tonight. Last year Kairos 4tet was nominated in the best jazz act category, and Empirical and Yolanda Brown are recent winners. It’s a very difficult one to call, and I’ve blogged about this before in connection with the Mercurys.

The four in the frame for me this year are: 

Ayanna Witter-Johnson
Truthfully

The cellist vocalist released this EP quietly last year. A rare UK winner at the famed Apollo amateur night in New York where she also spent time as a student at the Manhattan School of Music Witter-Johnson has the ability to cross boundaries with her carefully crafted compositions and thoughtful manner. If the 27-year-old Londoner gets the nomination, it will be for her authenticity and quiet distinctiveness, a quality in short supply for sure. 

Femi Temowo
Orin Meta
Just under a year ago guitarist Femi Temowo launched his second album Orin Meta in the unusual surroundings of Under The Bridge, the venue beneath the Shed End of Chelsea FC’s Stamford Bridge home, Best known for his work with Soweto Kinch who also appears on the album among a large cast of musicians and singers the British Nigerian surely has an original guitar approach, marking him out as a new jazz guitar star having absorbed his influences and come up with something new, honed in the past by performing with Soweto Kinch in the early J-Noir promoted days of Kinch’s career at gigs in the West End around 2003, and as a leader with his partly realised debut album Quiet Storm already under his belt released five years ago. He could well be on the MOBO radar this year.

Zara McFarlane
Until Tomorrow

Released on Gilles Peterson’s label last year this took a while to grow but with a confident live performance and interesting, emotive songs blessed with unusual harmonies and a refreshing approach McFarlane (pictured, top) made a lot of fans with this album. It’s a long way since she was a vocalist with Jazz Jamaica, but even then when she sang on Stevie Wonder’s ‘My Cherie Amour’ it was clear she had a big talent that has now come to fruition. Zara would be a popular choice.  

Zoe Rahman
Kindred Spirits
Zoe has won a Mercury nomination in the past and at the beginning of her career a Perrier, so she’s no stranger to awards. Very experienced, an unusual pianist in that her key jazz influence was Joanne Brackeen, and she merges music from her Bengali heritage and even Irish heritage on this her latest album. Touring with Courtney Pine and Spatial AKA has added to her range and stagecraft, and her inclusion on the MOBO list of nominations would be a shrewd and knowledgeable choice.  

Let’s see who’s on the list. From 8pm #mobo on Twitter and over at mobo.com

Stephen Graham

UPDATE: All the above were indeed nominated plus Roller Trio

One of the classiest guitarists and singers around, Matt Backer crops up in all sorts of people’s bands and on their records, most notably in recent years with Rumer on the superb Seasons of my Soul, and he’s currently touring with the Radio 2 A-playlisted Ethio-Swedish singer Emilia Mitiku.

But Backer doesn’t often release his own records, and the possibly ironically-titled Idle Hands is that bit more special for this reason.

His last album The Impulse Man came out in 2006 and picked up plenty of airplay in the States, but it was five years on from Is That All? So following a certain pattern here comes this one, with Julian Lennon joining the London-based American on the stirring ‘All That You’ve Wanted’, the fourth track here.

Martin Fry of ABC, who performed with Backer’s band at a rollicking Blues Kitchen gig in Camden at the tail end of last year, is also featured on the likeable Radio 2-friendly ‘Halfway To Jessica’ complete with a slab of standout Shadows-like shuddering bass.

But the album begins on a different tack with the Steely Dan-esque ‘Let’s Art’ and ‘Freak Patrol’, so there’s plenty of variety at work with Backer even unashamedly garage rock-inclined at times with a bluesy tinge on ‘I’m No Fool.’ A welcome return from a fine player who really should be better known under his own name.   

Stephen Graham

Released by Right Recordings through Nova. Out now.