A few thoughts immediately spring to mind about The Master. First of all it’s a very long wait until November when the film, the latest by Paul Thomas Anderson is released. Anderson, for Magnolia and more recently There Will Be Blood, is one of the artiest of ‘commercial’ arthouse directors possessing the unique ability to combine the most arresting of visual images (think the frogs raining from the sky to the waifish wailing of Aimee Mann or the gushing of Brahms to the blackest of an oil well in spate in Blood) to music. Secondly, with a score once again on an Anderson film by Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood (pictured below), there is beyond the gloriously fractured themes infused by the spirit of the Polish classical avant garde (Penderecki, who Greenwood has worked with, and maybe Lutoslawski) music which accompanies a plot that concerns itself with the story of a Naval veteran played by Joaquin Phoenix coming home from war who falls under the spell of The Cause (pick a cult, any cult) led by its maverick and slightly disturbing leader, played by Philip Seymour Hoffman, who you’ll remember was the much put upon nurse in Magnolia.

From what I’ve heard so far of the score it has a substantial, fibrous feel to it, with plenty of crunch points that effortlessly point to a sense of mystique without appearing to do so in an obvious way. The Master is debuting at The Venice Film Festival this week and undoubtedly early reviews will appear in the national press shortly.

The other aspect that occurs to me that is worth mentioning is the way the extra music in the film, whether it is ‘Get Thee Behind Me Satan’ sung by Ella Fitzgerald, or ‘Don’t Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else But Me)’ performed by Madisen Beaty, or the spooky version of Chopin’s Tristesse ‘No Other Love’ by Jo Stafford or best of all the ambiguous ‘Changing Partners’ by Helen Forrest (pictured top) makes you revisit songs that on a reissued CD would not be so gripping all together. That’s partly the skill of the juxtaposing of this often old-sounding music with the very modern Greenwood score, so the context changes the perception. Older readers will recall Forrest who had wartime hits with the Harry James band, but on this soundtrack is accompanied by the Sy Oliver orchestra.

One final thing about the music, it features Shabaka Hutchings, Neil Charles and Tom Skinner collectively Zed-U, along with veteran Humphrey Lyttelton clarinettist Jimmy Hastings and the London Contemporary Orchestra violinist Daniel Pioro on the eighth track, which is titled ‘Able-Bodied Seamen’. A certain clarinet-led experimental modernism Greenwood explores heavily on this track and adds that bit more interest for jazz people with their involvement here. So remember, remember the fifth of November when the soundtrack is released by Nonesuch: it might even send you off to explore the vocal jazz of the 1940s with renewed interest.

Stephen Graham

Journey into the night on the jazz scene anywhere and you’ll find people you’d never even imagined were there playing like their lives depended on it.

Subterranean by nature, nocturnal by instinct, they thrive on the spontaneous, and instigate creative situations that in time mutate into the music of the future. They could come from anywhere. Jamming, they play gigs starting ever later in the evening, eventually surfacing as night becomes day with a visit to a studio and an album that often or not causes a stir.

Guitarist Hannes Riepler is one such musician who, for the past two years, has been organising weekly concerts and jam sessions at Charlie Wright’s club in Hoxton, a hub for musicians on the up and up, and for visiting luminaries passing through London wishing to let off a bit of steam in John Nash’s congenial bar a short stroll from where the Bass Clef fulfilled a similar role in the 1990s.

Riepler is 33, from Austria, and is influenced by the likes of John Scofield and Kurt Rosenwinkel. His debut self-penned album The Brave just released by Huddersfield indie jazz label Jellymould matches the guitarist, whose roots are in the acoustic period of jazz from the 1950s and 60s, to a strong band. His fellow Bravehearts include Troyka’s Kit Downes; Ma’s saxophone hard hitter Tom Challenger; newcomer bassist Ryan Trebilcock; and Kairos 4tet’s drummer, Jon Scott. Recorded in the spring of 2010, Riepler arrived in London via study in Amsterdam more than half a decade ago, and honed his sound by checking out the scene all over London playing with young stars along the way including the late trumpeter Richard Turner who died in tragic circumstances last summer, and who The Brave is dedicated to along with Riepler’s dad. Stephen Graham

Hannes Riepler, leads the jam session every Tuesday at Charlie Wright’s in Hoxton. http://www.charliewrights.com

This is a small extract from an article published in the July issue of Jazzwise available in larger branches of WH Smith and selected local newsagents. Download the app from the Apple store for the Jazzwise iPhone and tablet edition, or subscribe at jazzwisemagazine.com

Brass Jaw saxophonist Konrad Wiszniewski and pianist Euan Stevenson have come together to record New Focus, a quartet album with additional string quartet and harp instrumentation, to be released by bassist Michael Janisch’s label Whirlwind just ahead of this year’s London Jazz Festival.

The album features original music by the pair working inside a quartet, which also comprises Scottish National Jazz Orchestra drummer Alyn Cosker, and Janisch on bass; and they’re joined by the Glasgow String Quartet, made up of players from the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, and harpist Alina Bzhezhinska.

Recorded and mixed at Castlesound Studios in Scotland and released on 5 November, tracks are: ‘Nicola’s Piece’, ‘Intro’, ‘El Paraiso’, ‘For Ray’, ‘Interlude’, ‘Music for a Northern Mining Town’, ‘Illuminate’, ‘Dziadzio’, ‘Leonard’s Lament’ and ‘Parsons Green.’

While Glasgow-based Wiszniewski is well known for his work with the hard gigging Brass Jaw and in his writing for New Focus draws on his Polish and Scottish heritage, Stevenson is less known outside Scotland but with influences including Oscar Peterson, George Shearing and Bill Evans the pianist has quickly achieved a following in his homeland in a relatively short space of time with BBC Radio Scotland broadcasts bringing his music to an audience far beyond the jazz club and concert hall circuit. Stevenson also leads his own standards-rooted trio, and has worked as an arranger for trumpeter Colin Steele’s high powered Edinburgh Jazz Festival Orchestra. Tour dates include the Jazz Bar in Edinburgh on 26 September; Glasgow Art Club (27 Sept); Pizza Express Jazz Club, London (13 November); The Institute, New Lanark (24 Nov); and the Lemon Tree, Aberdeen (29 Nov).

Stephen Graham

Konrad Wiszniewski and Euan Stevenson pictured above