Look for Ballades this month. Meanwhile go back to listen to a Billy Reid song Jamal breathed new instrumental life into on Blue Moon.

Listen closely to the percussive ocean contributed by Weather Report legend long time Ahmadian, Manolo Badrena. The magic starts meshing with Herlin Riley like brothers from around 25 seconds in. Puerto Rican Badrena played tambourine on ‘Birdland’ (click to listen) ffs no less.

Jamal’s part, the changes towards the end say from the governor at 3mins 30secs on especially are beautiful. Above: first sung and as ‘The Gipsy’ so rendered brand new in a lilting 1945 treatment by Dorothy Squires.

Touring in the States next month ‘Time-Lapse City’ is from the GoGo Penguin upcoming EP Ocean in a Drop: Music for Film to be released to chime with their Texas and California dates. Inspired by Koyaanisqatsi, the Mancs perform the soundtrack live to the film in LA (8 October) and San Fran (9).

OK, the new regular “not jazz” but staggering listening nevertheless. Yep, the one that everyone is talking about, Norman Fucking Rockwell by Lana Del Rey. A little hush please. Best line, actually best word perhaps in the whole caboodle — the way she inflects the first of these “Hello, it’s the most famous woman you know on the iPad.” Spooky or what.

The Tomorrow’s Warriors #IAmWarrior fundraising drive has been successful.

A whopping £119,743 has been raised. The target was £100,000.

Thanking those who donated, the Tomorrow’s Warriors website features a message explaining:

“We have secured match funding of £100,000 from Arts Council England to pay for the resources needed to continue delivering an exciting, year-round comprehensive learning and training programme for our young musicians, helping us to transform young lives...

“Our students, parents, staff and wonderful supporters can stop and take a deep breath, safe in the knowledge that the immediate threat to our programme has been lifted and we can now put all our energies into securing long-term funding for our Young Artist Development Programme.”

The initiative was launched in the autumn of 2018. 

 

TRACK OF THE WEEK  #NewMusicFriday Tremendously swinging agility from the piano master Chick Corea on Monk’s ‘Work’ drawn from Trilogy 2 (to be released on 4 October) only a few months after Antidote. This is quite different and the continuation of a story begun to be told. Such open interplay throughout. A conversation between protagonists all – delivering crucially individually and collectively in the moment.

Superstar trio, the Pettifordian bass matador Christian McBride and the great Wayne Shorter drummer Brian Blade join Chick: this new Concord issued double album arrives six years on from the initial double Grammy winning Trilogy release.

Live, recorded on tour Corea’s ‘500 Miles High’ from Return to Forever album Light as a Feather is included among the mix of standards and originals that also spans Corea all time classic ‘La Fiesta’. In press material Chick is quoted as saying on his arrangement of Stevie Wonder’s ‘Pastime Paradise’ from Songs in the Key of Life: “I’ve been friends with Stevie since he used to come around to listen to Return to Forever in 1973 at The Bitter End. A few years ago Stevie sat in with us at Catalina’s in Los Angeles and we went out to dinner afterwards. We were talking about songs and I was using the term ‘standards,’ and Stevie turned to me and said, ‘Hey Chick, what do you think about playing some new standards?’ I thought that was interesting and asked, ‘What do you mean?’ And he said, ‘You know – my music!’ He was kind of kidding around, but not completely, and I thought that was a great idea.” Full track listing: Disc 1: How Deep Is the Ocean, 500 Miles High, Crepuscule with Nellie, Work, But Beautiful, La Fiesta.  Disc 2: Eiderdown, All Blues, Pastime Paradise, Now He Sings, Now He Sobs, Serenity, Lotus Blossom.

Back in the summertime release Chick on the superb Antidote revisited songs from his albums My Spanish Heart and Touchstone with a multi-cultural octet, sprinkling in a few new compositions and guest appearances by vocalists Rubén Blades, Chick’s wife Gayle Moran Corea, and Maria Bianca, a reminder once again how important it is to listen and learn from the masters of the music. Trilogy 2 continues that significant, immersive, process. 

Philos came out earlier this year to deserved acclaim. Park Jiha performs her tunes solo by looping and layering abstract lines played on the Korean instruments the piri, which is sort of a bamboo oboe, double reed mouth organ the saenghwang; and on yanggeum – a metal-stringed hammered dulcimer.

She plays Rich Mix during the K Music festival on 17 October.

Parting is beauty’s creation./Parting’s beauty is not in the substanceless gold of morning nor in the woofless black silk of night nor in deathless immortal life,/nor is it in the unfading blue flower of heaven./Love, if it were not for parting I would not be able to live again in a/smile having once died in tears. Oh, parting./Beauty is parting’s creation. (Manhae) 

Find yourself – in E1. Tickets

 

O lapwing thou fliest around the heath

Nor seest the net that is spread beneath

Why dost thou not fly among the corn fields

They cannot spread nets where a harvest yields

 William Blake 

 

archive

We looked up 6 jazz blogs so you don’t have to or think about Boorish Wanton. If you must regarding the latter somehow the soundtrack of classic Sex Pistols Never Mind the Bollocks Here’s the Sex Pistols seems apt as a suggestion. “The record bristles with exhilarating negation – no feelings, no future – and the pull of abjection,” notes Matthew Worley: professor of modern history at the University of Reading. Otherwise the new doom epic from Sunn O))) Pyroclasts will do. Topicality even out of context is all, huh? As for the former at the outset scroll down for a few jazz jottings.  

  

Music and More have reviewed Live at Newport Jazz “a very entertaining concert”... the blog jazz.org is still on holiday but back in August they were rounding up September...  John Fordham says in londonjazznews.com that Vijay “Iyer has revealed himself to be an audacious original... the librarians in Darmstadt have taken a break from stacking shelves and have been blogging too and alert us to a Wiener Zeitung interview with Maceo Parker... Who in the 1950s “swished between jazz and R&B”? Jazzwax has an inkling... Talk about, finally, an ode to a Norwegian strobe, yep Nextbop have the scoop and check out Michael Janisch live. 

If you are looking for a uniquely plaintive quality in trumpet quest no further than ‘Why Should There Be Stars’ the runaway success among all these very tasteful tracks.

Roney has delivered one of his best albums in a long while and yet... sometimes a three-star album which this is nonetheless is more than enough and yet frustrating.

While it is not going to change the world it may just change your day. You can feel the limits: but maybe great artistry (and Roney has shown that for many years) is about knowing what you can do and doing it. The rest is just conversation.

Roney needs a new producer like someone who would argue with him and he would accept the word! 

Anyway Blue Dawn Blue Nights however is very poignant, there is a lot of personal sadness to reflect, and often it is quite moving.

Listen you need to be able to work out that you are coming to Roney for a subtle musical personality whose sound lands at the heart of modal Milesian jazz. After all he quite comfortably fell into the Milesian world at first hand and stood in for Miles towards the end of the Picasso of Cool’s life.

Roney has made approaching a couple of dozen records. Quite a few blur into one and yet you know exactly why you listen to him and go to hear him live. Last time I saw him it was slightly bizarre: who wears sunglasses inside anyway when the stage lights are not even that bright! And yet I for one did not want to go home.

There is a Roney world. His persona invades you. A club player not a big hall player ideally even if most musicians want to play to the biggest audiences imaginable for good career reasons it is not always ideal for most and Roney needs you to be there in a space where people do not get lost in themselves and the architecture. 

Here with an accomplished if necessarily anonymous band, saxophonist Emilio Modeste, pianist Oscar Williams II, bassist Paul Cuffari, and his teenage nephew, certainly a talent drummer Kojo Odu Roney + cameos from guitarist Quintin Zoto and the great Lenny White. Recorded at Rudy Van Gelder’s studio in New Jersey it sounds right from an engineering point of view. Roney soars.  SG

The Like Water For Chocolate hip-hop great returns with Let Love (Loma Vista *****). A thrill it arrives three years on from Black America Again. Tracks are: 
1 Good Morning Love featuring Samora Pinderhughes
2 HER Love feat. Daniel Caesar, Dwele
3 Dwele’s Interlude
4 Hercules feat. Swizz Beatz
5 Fifth Story feat. Leikeli47
6 Forever Your Love feat. BJ The Chicago Kid
7 Leaders (Crib Love) feat. A-Trak
8 Memories Of Home feat. BJ The Chicago Kid, Samora Pinderhughes
9 Show Me That You Love feat. Jill Scott, Samora Pinderhughes
10 My Fancy Free Future Love
11 God Is Love feat. Jonathan McReynolds, Leon Bridges

Look for The Silver Messengers from which ‘Soul Searching’ is drawn by Carmen Souza on Galileo in October.

Supermario artworkA very invigorating one this, the Babel label currently on a Loredana roll after a long hiatus following the departure to pastures new of label lieutenant, the affable Ozymandias reciting Paul Lewis.

Paulo Dias Duarte is a Portuguese composer and guitarist on the London scene for over a decade and a half. The orchestra has included an extraordinary array of top talent coming up. A bit of detective work has gone into this review so forgive the deerstalker quality. However, hey look there is the cover above and a word from Paulo.

So how does it begin? Deduce lots of twiddly guitar texture on the Intro and thereafter a veritable “seven part suite” the tracks no kidding Sherlock are numbered one to seven. More to the point each piece relates unlike a lot of albums where tracks live in their own Siberia and never melt even when there is a Gobi desert next door.

The word suite by the way is not mentioned. That is a blessing. For a brief minute the flavour is Beefheart-esque and then we are into electric guitar and a chunky Mingus-like vamp.

Muscular drums, anarchic horns, parping offbeats are all in the capacious larder. There is lots of gritty section work (eg on Part IV) and earlier Part II (coming up from the bass more Mingusiana mixed with that Chris Batchelor-esque flavour harking back to Loose Tubes initial listens conjured up). Flashingly cosmic keyboard part on this track, the arranging overall is extremely good. How you can sound free and yet write that freedom for a decent sized bunch of musicians and let them be themselves is achieved rewards plenty of head scratching.

A major new outfit, we have not had a big band such as this gathering since say the F-IRE Collective in their prime. Part III is like the ballad: certainly at the beginning, Duarte does not do plangent but here it is as close as makes no difference: An afternoon feel like a sort of anarchist holiday, bit of improving reading before the return to the protest and spot of rioting later in the improvisation.

Streaming on Spotify

Not jazz. Just a regular spot way out there to finish the day whenever possible. Outlaw country for a change 21st century style. Amazing stuff here from the Highwomen. Until next time.

From VII to be released on Ropeadope later this month by Chicago titan Ramsey Lewis and Urban Knights. Groovy, elastic, effortlessly seeming, full of detail, neat Harper Lee literary pun perhaps, in the title of the track and crucially not too smooth... Lewis of course world renowned for The In Crowd recorded in the Bohemian Caverns 54 years ago. Very tasteful press roll themed drum solo from Charles Heath beginning at the 4 minute mark worth clocking and Heath is the hearth of the matter burning from the beginning. Essential. Lewis’ main theme, that thing he does at 1min and 21secs is a marvel – the surprise and gleam of instant sunshine and then a full on blissed out pitch bent like a rubber band synth solo from Tim (Daddy O) Gant to wig out to.