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Eleni Karaindrou
Concert in Athens
ECM New Series ***
With a considerable body of work for ECM already in the catalogue, this Athens concert hall performance of music by the distinguished veteran film, theatre and TV composer Eleni Karaindrou recorded in 2010 begins somewhat glacially with saxophonist Jan Garbarek a slightly masked presence at first. Slowly its treasure unfolds as the strings draw out the tender theme. Along with other guests, celebrated viola player Kim Kashkashian and oboist Vangelis Christopoulos with Karaindrou on piano, this chamber music album, utilising a small band of musicians and the Camerata Friends of Music Orchestra conducted by Alexandros Myrat, takes in music written for the films of the late Theo Angelopoulos, with whom Karaindrou is strongly associated, as well as music for the theatre including American classics Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Death of a Salesman. ‘Requiem for Willie Loman’, the tragic hero of Arthur Miller’s great play, and the very theme captured so well by Garbarek, and reprised at the end of the album once more, is the sort of work that the composer must have had to keep a brave face writing. You’d need to be made of flint not to be moved by this album highlight as it unfolds so unflinchingly and returns so effectively at the album’s conclusion. So, superior arthouse mood music as a whole, with a serious disposition the meditational footprint of which is often tellingly felt. SG
Released on 11 February 

Dominic Alldis
A Childhood Suite
Canzona ***1/2
In Dominic Alldis’s latest trio album A Childhood Suite for jazz piano trio and orchestra, the pianist, arranger, and composer explains he is “always looking for melodic material with which to inspire new creative projects.” He had realized at an earlier point that the simplicity of nursery rhymes allowed for great variation and instant recognition, and earlier album Songs We Heard (with bassist Mark Hodgson and drummer Stephen Keogh) first drew on the idea of a trio improvising on nursery rhymes from around the world. This new release reworks more than a dozen of these arrangements, adding a string section and containing an Alldis original. With the pianist are modern-mainstream bassist Andrew Cleyndert, and Spin Marvel drummer Martin France, whose trio work with John Taylor and Palle Danielsson has been justly praised. Beautifully recorded at Menuhin Hall, A Childhood Suite, has a simplicity and sincerity rare these days in the hustle and bustle of the record industry demanding a certain crash, bang, wallop approach. You many have come across Bruno Heinen’s Dialogues trio record Twinkle Twinkle last year, when the pianist put ‘Twinkle Twinkle’ under the microscope as Mozart did in a different time and fashion, and as Alldis does here. But think of A Childhood Suite as a broader sweep, beyond jazz although of it in the same way as the album draws on classical music, with a soft soothing touch more like a finely constructed harmonic reverie than a more inquisitive foray at the raw materials of the musical themes. ‘London Bridge is Falling Down’ is typical of some of the momentum generated by the trio, and with a dark opening, the mood changes to allow for a developing momentum and joyousness that many of the other improvisations also possess. Very much in the Jacques Loussier or David Rees-Williams stream of light jazz and classical synthesis it’s an album that never lacks for charm and empathy, with some lovely moments along the way including the captivating Vaughan Williams-like violin solo and fine arrangement on ‘Girls and Boys Come Out To Play.’ Stephen Graham
The Dominic Alldis trio pictured above

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Last year was like a dream for Roller Trio, and it wasn’t just that they picked up nods from the Mercury and MOBO prize panjandrums or surprise discombobulated indie scenesters at the Roundhouse. It was also a good year for the F-IRE label whose vicarious pleasure in their band’s success was palpable. image
This year, once the snow has melted, is about touring and while the northern outfit is not returning to Milo’s in Leeds where the fuse was lit at least on YouTube where you’ll see them play ‘The Nail That Stands Up’, Roller Trio are appearing not far away at the Venue in Leeds College of Music, the very college where the band first met. Super educated young jazz polite boys and girls who haven’t heard them so far can catch the band there should they venture out or at a jazz spot around and about. Dates are: The Lescar, Sheffield (30 January); Kings Place, London (2 February); King Tut’s, Glasgow (23 Feb); Capstone Theatre, Liverpool (28 Feb); Norwich Arts Centre, Norwich (7 March); Vibraphonic Festival, Exeter (14 March); Venue, Leeds (22 March); Cheltenham Jazz Festival, Cheltenham (6 May); and Hare and Hounds, Birmingham, on 29 May. SG
The Venue, Leeds College of Music top where Roller trio above, right play in March