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Basquiat Strings
Part two
F-IRE **** Recommended
Opening with the aching squall of ‘Calum Campbell’ Part Two was recorded two years on from the Basquiats’ picking up what was a welcome but surprise Mercury nomination in 2007 but has waited until this year to be released. As previously reported in marlbank the new-look Basquiats, with Fly Agaric polymath Fred Thomas on board playing bass, are touring soon, but this is the familiar line-up. What set them apart from other strings groups who play jazz in the first place was the contribution of Seb Rochford, the remarkable Polar Bear drummer who’s also featured on the acclaimed new Rokia Traoré record Beautiful Africa.

But the Basquiats are first and foremost the vision of cellist Ben Davis and all the tunes and arrangements apart from ‘It Ain’t Necessarily So’ are his, and they are as simpático to a jazz way of being within the loose framework of serialism as you could wish. His wonderfully expressive solo on ‘Hop Scotch’ also shows his great facility as a performer, the solo emerging organically to make a strong impact.

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 Achingly “as one”, violinists Emma Smith and Vicky Fifield, with viola player Jennymay Logan, bassist Richard Pryce, Davis and Rochford are a true unit and it’s a shame in a way this is a time machine recording although when Davis tours with the new-look band the spirit I’m sure will remain.

The Basquiats stand tall with radio.string.quartet.vienna and the Atom String Quartet but they’re perhaps closer to the experimental jazz approach in essence than both these impressive outfits. On Basquiat Strings With Seb Rochford  the musicians were able to reimagine material such as Ornette Coleman’s ‘Lonely Woman’, and Ornette’s spirit hovers benignly on the new record as well, But on Emma Smith’s solo on ‘History of Her’, the third track, there’s a sense of even more jazz delving and the improvising takes on a still more natural dimension than on the first record. Smith (and Rochford for that matter) are on the new Ellington in Anticipation record, one of the best new jazz records from Britain in years, and her work here, soloing on three tracks, can be listened to happily along Mark Lockheart’s fine record even if it predates it. A uniformly excellent album, well worth seeking out. SG

The album cover top and Ben Davis right

Released on 13 May

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Jazzahead in Bremen later this week promises a feast of music and much new jazz in store, and there’s a major opportunity to sample a great deal of new sounds resolutely below the radar, brand new or just under known. It’s not just about live music, though, as the jazz music business gathers en masse in the German city in increasing numbers each year, the event having taken on the mantle of a latterday MIDEM for jazz. Here’s a brief look at what’s on offer this year. The partner country in 2013 is Israel, and there are many new and established Israeli jazz acts appearing in Bremen. Also look out for a broad cross-section of the host country Germany’s burgeoning scene often little known internationally, as well as jazz from all over Europe and beyond. On Thursday 25 April check out Yotam, and the Omer Klein Trio as a taster while on Friday 26 April the Olivia Trummer trio, Avishai Cohen trio, and the jazz@Israel jam session are distinct highlights. Saturday 27 April has a British presence with Zoe Rahman, Beats & Pieces, and Django Bates all appearing. Also worth making a point to catch are the Helge Lien trio from Norway, Belgian pace setters De Beren Gieren, and the unique sound of Elina Duni and her quartet.
More at http://www2.jazzahead.de/en 

Zoe Rahman above

Cæcilie Norby
Silent Ways
ACT ***1/2

With the husky Danish singer’s take on the opening track here of Duffy’s ‘Stepping Stone’ one of the surprise highlights of the various artists Magic Moments 6: In the Spirit of Jazz compilation recently I was looking forward to Silent Ways. And this is quite a band joining Norby typically expressive and in control. With her are her husband, brilliant bassist Lars Danielsson; the dynamic pianist Leszek Możdżer; Vietnamese guitarist Nguyên Lê and the less familiar Turkish/Swedish drummer Robert Mehmet Ikiz; along with saxophonist Marius Neset, on the ACT radar I think for the first time as a tasteful guest, especially on ‘Have You Ever Seen the Rain’ by Creedence Clearwater Revival’s John Fogerty.

Leonard Cohen’s ‘In My Secret Life’, from 2001 album Ten New Songs, brings out the best of Norby here, and in some ways it’s even better than ‘Stepping Stone’. Mostly rock covers Możdżer lays out a solo on the Cohen song stocked here with a vocabulary of melodic imagination all of his own that takes the breath away while Norby luxuriates in the song. Not everything works: I wish Norby didn’t sing Dylan quite the way she does in such a cabaret style, but her infinitely pleasant easygoing blues vocal manner taps into a kind of a tradition you don’t often hear nowadays. Her middle of the road version of Paul Simon’s ‘Hearts and Bones’ could be played again and again on Radio 2, but probably won’t be.

Highlights? Well, Lê’s poignant solo on the title track is beautifully interpreted; and his interplay with the singer is a real education. But if you’re looking to Norby to ‘do edgy’ then forget about it. If, though, you’d prefer a singer who delivers quality interpretations of a range of mostly well chosen songs, then step this way. SG

Released at the end of May
Cæcilie Norby, top. Photo: Stephen Freiheit

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There’s a new jazz and cinema two-part series beginning next Monday at 10pm on Radio 2 presented by singer/pianist Jamie Cullum whose latest album Momentum is released in May. The hour-long first part of Jazz at the Movies focuses on early cinema history, the struggle for racial equality and the discrimination African American musicians faced, and there’s an emphasis on Duke Ellington’s ‘Symphony in Black’. Cullum looks at how cartoon character Betty Boop broke down the racial and sexual conventions of the day although she was later censored, and concentrates on Ellington’s music for Anatomy of a Murder, and Martial Solal’s for Godard’s Breathless (A Bout De Souffle).

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Nigel Mooney
The Bohemian Mooney
Lyte Records****
Named after a Dublin pub The Bohemian Mooney is the Irish singer and guitarist’s bluesy second album following All My Love’s In Vain back in 2005. Nearly four years in the can the new record features a core band of pianist Johnny Taylor, bassist Dan Bodwell and drummer Dominic Mullan, and guests include the great Georgie Fame on a couple of tracks and the Irish jazz icon Louis Stewart who plays rhythm guitar on three tracks.

Mooney has a warm authentic blues and soul voice, think James Hunter a bit, a dash of Van Morrison here and there, and Brother Ray of course, and plays the guitar like Kenny Burrell at times. It’s old fashioned jazz blues with some Mooney originals, some Ray Charles (a swinging ‘Ain’t That Love’ a highlight), standards in ‘April in Paris’ for instance, and a traditional blues thrown in for good measure with Robert Johnson’s ‘Hellhound on my Trail’ superbly done.

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‘Hard Times’ is the first great interpretation here, five songs in, after some enjoyable scene-setting with Georgie and Louis on ‘Down for Double’, Basie guitarist Freddie Green’s song that Mel Tormé put words to. ‘April in Paris’ is a bit cheesier with glossy horns but there’s a good swing shuffle from Mullan and Mooney croons a bit which he doesn’t really do anywhere else on the album.

Arranged and produced by Mooney the title track has a really catchy guitar opening line (recalling the tune of ‘It Ain’t Necessarily So’) that moves more into Grant Green territory after a while and bassist Bodwell rises to the occasion sounding a bit like that fine player David Hayes. ‘Bohemian Moondance’ joins the dots between the opening fast take on ‘Milestones’ and Van Morrison’s ‘Moondance’ with plenty of improvising along the way. Infectious stuff with a lot of spirit, and that’s not just the gin and dry vermouth. SG 
The cover of The Bohemian Mooney
top and Nigel Mooney above

Released on 27 May

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Melt Yourself Down
Melt Yourself Down
Leaf **

This is disappointing. It just has nowhere to go. Fizzing with energy but within the confines of a small musical structure trying to be a commercial dance record (maybe the remix will be better!), it beats at the walls but the walls simply won’t give. Ruth Goller’s bass guitar is gutsy enough on the opener ‘Fix My Life’ but the vocals of Kushal Gaya sound so processed and it’s not dangerous enough or as inventive as say Sons of Kemet, another band drummer Tom Skinner’s currently a member of. Pete Wareham has been searching for a way to reinvent himself since the curious decision to close down the much better Acoustic Ladyland and he’s moved completely away from conventional jazz and more into the arms of one of his big influences James Chance, mixing punk-funk with Afro flavours. The band seem to stall no matter how hard Tom Skinner pushes, and even Shabaka Hutchings sounds as if he’s being held back. Transglobal Underground’s Satin Singh adds some interest on percussion, but these eight pent-up tracks refuse to catch: the material just isn’t strong enough. Stephen Graham
 

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Laszlo Gardony
Clarity
Sunnyside ***

When Tommy Smith was starting out, and a student at Berklee in Boston, the young saxophonist was part of a band called Forward Motion. The pianist in the band, Laszlo Gardony, a Hungarian-American has made many records since but retains the link to Smith’s alma mater, as since the 1980s the professor has taught at Berklee. Clarity is an unusual, and quite brave, album. He says in the notes: “I was at my Berklee studio all by myself. I felt a burst of inspiration so I set up some mics, turned on a recorder and started playing. I kept playing for 49 minutes.” Each short piece, he explains, took on from the previous one but he put the recording away; and not until a few months later would he listen to what he had performed last year. The resulting album, so much for months spent in the studio and an eternity in post-production, is probably best compared with earlier solo piano album Changing Standards (1990), the originals here the yin to the yang of the evergreen tunes back then. Despite the passage of time and difference in method the two compare very well: Gardony’s approach is muscular but quite passionate, and it’s from the fourth track, ‘Working Through (Clarity)’, that the music really begins to speak. It’s a kind of Gnostic meditation in the manner of Keith Jarrett (and track six, ‘Better Place’, is very Jarrettian) but with a few bravura twists, quite a lot of folk music, even gospel, but oddly very little bebop. Occasionally this very spontaneous set sags, but not for long, and is as honest an album as you’ll come across. That transparency is its strength and appeal, as well as a natural improviser’s flair at play.
Released in May.
The cover of Clarity, above

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Matt Ridley, Vortex, London: Monday

Whirlwind Recordings, bassist Michael Janisch’s label, has shown consistent growth in terms of output and quality in the last two years and ahead of releasing a new live album by Lee Konitz soon, a landmark release for Whirlwind, the label has now signed the Matt Ridley Trio for an autumn release with the bassist’s debut album Thymos (Greek for ‘spiritedness’) set to appear in the autumn. With alto saxophone star Jason Yarde guesting, bassist Ridley, a Trinity college of music graduate in 2005, will preview tunes from the album at this Vortex club show. The bassist’s trio features John Turville, whose Parliamentary award-winning album Midas, first put the pianist on the map, along with relative unknown George Hart on drums. Pretty much a complete unknown himself still, Ridley has, though, worked extensively as a member of the popular Darius Brubeck Quartet touring widely, and has appeared with the MJQ Celebration band featuring Jim Hart, Barry Green, and Steve Brown, as well as the Lyric Ensemble. A SE London Collective scenester Ridley has also collaborated with celebrated oudist Attab Haddad, who is an additional guest on Thymos. His trip to east London is just the start for a player whose name we might well have to more acquainted with before too long.
Matt Ridley above
Tickets, and more details, at www.vortexjazz.co.uk

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‘Put it in the pocket’
Freddie Hubbard
From Liquid Love
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNWqyaLlolg
Compilations are anathema to most serious jazz fans or at best a guilty pleasure. But despite this there’s always a function in a compilation even if it’s a throwaway item and maybe a single track, if you’re lucky, just cries out to be heard such as this Freddie Hubbard gem linked to above.

Compilations are ideal though for dipping your toes in the waters of a style you don’t know or catching up on a movement that’s passed you by. But sometimes the sheer brutal force of a style lumped together can also show that despite artists’ best intentions to be individual their sound is more generic than they might well think, or listeners even realise catching their output in isolation.

The Demon music group’s Harmless Records for a decade has been putting out compilations in quantity covering, soul, and funk and next month Backbeats: In The Pocket – 70s Jazz Funk is coming, released on 13 May.

In the wake of whosampled.com all the detective work involved in sourcing these tiny slabs of dancefloor pleasure is easier. But there’s still an art in making a compilation even when the process is democratised: you can’t vote for knowledge, more’s the pity. Compilers Dean Rudland and Ralph Tee are some of the best in the business and Backbeats features music compiled from Columbia, Arista, Epic, RCA and CTI releases in a decade where this style of jazz gave way to disco.

Tracks here are Earth Wind and Fire’s ‘Africano’ from That’s the Way of the World; Herbie Hancock’s ‘Just Around The Corner’ from Manchild; Webster Lewis’ ‘Barbara Ann’ from Touch My Love; Ramsey Lewis’ ‘Brazilica’ from Salongo; Lonnie Liston Smith’s ‘In the Park’ from Love is the Answer; Harvey Mason’s ‘Hop Scotch’ from Marching in the Streets; Eddie Russ’ ‘Zauis’ from See the Light Monument; Freddie Hubbard’s ‘Put it in the Pocket’ from Liquid Love; Charles Earland’s ‘Coming to You Live’ from Coming to You Live; Weldon Irvine’s ‘Sinbad’ from RCA album Sinbad; Willie Bobo’s ‘Palos’ from Bobo; and Hubert Laws’ ‘Chicago Theme (Love Loop)’ from The Chicago Theme.

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Some festivals hang around for ages to name their line-ups. Others don’t. So while the Edinburgh jazz festival in July is still a blank sheet as far as the line-up is concerned (wonder why?), Kings Place in London in September has announced its. The festival crams in well over 100 events over three days at the York Way complex near St Pancras station and St Martin’s art college. This year the festival runs from 13-15 September and besides jazz there’s lots of classical music, art and talks. Oddarrang, Slowly Rolling Camera, Vive and Jay Rayner’s Hungry Jazz: The Great American (Foodie) Songbook are first day highlights; while Saturday picks include singer Aimua Eghobamien, the Martin Speake trio, Nicolas Meier, and ECM band, Food. The Jason Rebello trio and Dave Stapleton’s Cellophony play on the Sunday. More at www.kingsplace.co.uk/festival

Dionne Bennett, of Slowly Rolling Camera, above.
Photo: Tim Dickeson

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Seven Hills: imbued with the spirit of Bill Evans

Alexi Tuomarila
Seven Hills
Edition ***1/2
Listen to 02, and Dark Eyes, and you’ll start to gain a glimpse of a hugely talented pianist whose much interrupted story starts again with Seven Hills. The Finn, also well known in Belgium having studied and lived there and where his wider reputation gained ground, has had his ups and downs as a fickle major label built him up and knocked him down before Tomasz Stańko, a great appreciator of piano talent, brought him into the fold to record Dark Eyes in 2009. Seven Hills, relating in its title to Lisbon, not the more obvious Rome,is increasingly, as the album develops, imbued with the spirit of Bill Evans and it’s a feeling that grows and grows like a rhapsody. With Tuomarila are highly cultured bassist Mats Eilertsen who’s also a member of Tord Gustavsen’s ensemble, and ex-Stańko drummer Olavi Louhivuori, plus Lisbon-born guitarist André Fernandes, who plays a little like Jakob Bro, on a couple of tracks. Nine tracks in all, beginning with the guitar-flavoured title track highlights are the fast flow of ‘Cyan’ decanting into unaffected melodicism; later ‘Visitor Q’ is gloriously quiet and unvarnished; and then Eilertsen’s bass opening to the folkloric ‘Miss’ has an involving poignancy that the album as a whole shares without being twee at all. The earlier ‘Skuld’ draws together a range of influences, again Bill Evans and perhaps Jan Johansson, with Eilertsen’s buzzy drone and jump-off riff bringing out the subtlety of Louhivuori, as Tuomarila measures his solo like a surveyor with a theodolite. SG
Alexi Tuomarila, above. Photo: Edition

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Ideal for Record Store Day, Cardiff jazz indie Edition, partnering with London vinyl specialists Gearbox, has released a limited heavyweight vinyl edition of Kenny Wheeler, Norma Winstone, and London Vocal Project’s Mirrors, a big highlight of the springtime jazz releases so far this year.

With all music by Kenny Wheeler, the poetry of Stevie Smith (1902-1971) lies at its heart, and Wheeler’s music has meshed with it perfectly. But it’s not just Smith whose work forms the text for the vocals element, here interpreted by the  25-strong LVP split into sopranos, altos, tenors and basses, with Wheeler joining on flugelhorn, Winstone the featured solo singer, pianist Nikki Iles, Polar Bear’s Mark Lockheart on saxophones, bassist Steve Watts, and drummer James Maddren. Besides settings of Smith’s work, the highlight of which for me is the delightful ‘Black March’ (‘I have a friend/At the end/Of the world’), there are settings of Lewis Carroll, and briefly WB Yeats.

Delight is a word that constantly springs to mind, an echo of ‘I sing this song for your delight’ on ‘Humpty Dumpty’ at the beginning. The singing is lovely throughout, ethereal, and endowed with a life force all of its own. Somehow everything manages to remain understated yet has impact, the unique charm of the album.

www.recordstoreday.co.uk/participating-stores

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What goes around: Local record shops are back from the dead

Record Store Day isn’t just about the special editions and novelty items released for the big day today. It’s primarily about going to a record shop. That’s actually stepping foot in one. For most people now it is a distinctly odd experience to do just this as it’s a thing that has gone out of fashion. When CDs were new the music industry predicted for years that the end was nigh for vinyl, and now the writing is on the wall for CDs, yet they too are still with us. The last two years has against all industry wisdom seen a big uplift in vinyl sales. Ask a label such as Gearbox who have responded with enthusiasm to the turn-up in trade and they’ll tell you about their Record Store Day plans, and that’s just for one. More at: http://www.marlbank.net/post/47693394770/record-store-day-approaches-hip-to-the-beat.

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Sphere: Barronial sounds

While genuinely rare vinyl attracts often staggeringly high prices on a par with a particularly fine vintage wine, relatively recent releases, particularly 1970s and 80s pressings of hard-to-find albums can still be snapped up for less than £10. And of course there’s the added bonus of artwork coming with the vinyl, and album information that digital formats are less equipped to handle unless you like tiny thumb nails run off on a home printer. But it’s not really about trophy items. Pop in, like I did earlier in the week, to an old favourite shop such as Alan’s in north London, where I was delighted to pick up Sphere’s Flight Path. Put out in 1983 a decade that many from the counter-culture generation thought was the death of music itself, on the back of this white Elektra Musician liveried cardboard cover there’s a pipe-smoking Charlie Rouse and the band grouped around him (that’s Buster Williams, the great Kenny Barron and Ben Riley) simply smiling. Put on first track ‘If I Should Lose You’ and you’ll join me in smiling too. And that’s what great music does, and you’ll find it nearer to you than you might think, in a last record shop standing, or not, and not just on Record Store Day. SG 

www.recordstoreday.co.uk/participating-stores

Miles Davis Quintet
Live in Europe 1969: The Bootleg Series Vol. 2
Columbia/Legacy (3 CDs and a DVD) ****

Recorded live in France, Sweden and Germany separated by less than four months these quintet recordings are a curiosity, the work of what’s being called a ‘lost band’ or more optimistically ‘the third great quintet’. It never released a studio album. The bootleg in the subtitle is slightly deceptive as these are official recordings made by European radio stations, not the work of fly-by-night characters with microphones hidden in their coats, and follow the first in the series a 1967 recording released two years ago. Miles is here with Wayne Shorter, the last remaining second quintet member besides the trumpeter; Chick Corea on electric piano and piano; Dave Holland on bass; and Jack DeJohnette, drums.

Tucked inside the box’s sleeve on the back of the pull-out notes there’s a black and white poster depicting four of the band with Wayne sporting a slight moustache caught in the middle of a solo, and Miles eyes shut standing beside him wearing leather trousers, DeJohnette at the back is in a stripy shirt, and a bearded Holland is looking down as he plays. They were even more snappily dressed in the Berlin video with Corea looking sombre.

Each album has stage introductions and share some songs although none are exactly the same in terms of tunes. There are two versions of ‘Miles Runs the Voodoo Down’, for instance, the first on the opening CD with Holland’s riff ringing clear and true. ‘Bitches Brew’ crops up on both the final CD recorded in Stockholm and on the DVD. Corea’s ‘This’ on the Stockholm CD, the producers note, Miles never officially recorded.

Downbeat writer Josef Woodward in the notes quotes Chick Corea who explains that the recordings “document an important step in Miles’ artistic development which take us from the famous suit-and-tie wearing quintet with Herbie… through to this quintet, which definitely leaned more towards the rock and beat generation.”

With electric piano and increased volume at times you can see what he means but how intense is the music? Well it’s not as in-your-face as say the Isle of Wight concert or some later studio sessions but there is plenty of fire power, the first a coiled fist within the velvet glove of ‘Sanctuary’ say and the abstractions of Corea on electric piano do give the music a very modernist edge. But contrast this with the beginning of ‘Milestones’, which sounds actually very old in the opening theme, like a jam session Miles might have played on in the earlier part of his career. Yet listen on and a transformation takes place: DeJohnette’s slashing rhythms are so very different. A track such as ‘Nefertiti’ on the second Antibes CD shows how modern the band is, the nihilism of Corea’s solo early on, say, and the blare and loneliness of ‘Sanctuary’.

George Wein’s polite introduction to the Stockholm concert leads into ‘Bitches Brew’ and this is when for me the music really gets going, more rock-inclined and getting pretty out there rapidly. DeJohnette is vital: providing rolling thunder in a makeshift laboratory. ‘This’, with its shrill opening, is an eye opener. Produced by Richard Seidel and Michael Cuscuna the set is yet another distinguished piece of curating “all in Honor of Miles Davis”. For the Miles Davis obsessive in your life, and those who are verging in that direction, it’s a must.

Stephen Graham         

 

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Nathan Haines
The Poet’s Embrace
Warner Jazz ****

At last gaining a UK release it’s the best album yet by hipster Haines playing a 1964 Selmer Mark VI

Dance music’s loss may well be jazz’s gain, as the New Zealand tenor saxophonist relocates his sound firmly within the spiritual domain. With his quartet here (pianist Kevin Field, bassist Thomas Botting, and drummer Alain Koetsier) the band journey deep into John Coltrane quartet territory rather than say Alice’s later experimentations beloved of the Mancunian Gondwana school. Dig deep, go way back and make it sincere, and Haines does this very admirably.

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Best heard on vinyl

A big gutsy sound, not too dissimilar to Alan Skidmore’s Coltranian tenor approach but with a dance floor skip inevitably folded in, on a ballad of the quality of ‘Offering’ Haines manages to reproduce the feeling Trane put into the different sounding ‘Naima’. That’s no small feat. Using vintage microphones and recording in analogue in Haines’ native New Zealand The Poet’s Embrace is detailed without being stuffy and should appeal to Impulse! obsessives everywhere. Most of the tunes are Haines’ but there’s a suitably laidback take on a tune credited here by Patrick Forge in the notes to Yusef Lateef but also confusingly in the credits to Song For My Father drummer Roy Brooks whose version of ‘Eboness’ (from 1973 Im-Hotep album Ethnic Expression) is nonetheless hugely collectable whoever the author is. Best heard, it’s almost compulsory to say, on vinyl: but the CD sound is immaculate. SG
Released on 6 May

Nathan Haines, top, and the album cover above

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Man of mystery Sam Lasserson joins Ethan Iverson above and Jeff Williams at the Vortex tomorrow

Surely Ethan Iverson won’t, will he, lean over to say ‘play it again, Sam?’ Even a whisper might be out of the question from the piano player, or the fun-loving fans in the audience bound to turn out in some number when The Bad Plus’ Iverson plays an exclusive trio club date tomorrow.

No, it’s not with The Bad Plus although he will be back on tour with the acclaimed trio in the UK soon but instead it’s with man of mystery, bassist Sam Lasserson, and the more familiar ex-Lee Konitz drummer and Dave Liebman associate, Jeff Williams whose new quartet album The Listener is released in June. But who exactly is Lasserson?

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Well, the bassist (above) is in ECM saxophonist Martin Speake’s quartet, and plays with rising star of the guitar Hannes Riepler, the “Country Gentleman” player who has been helming the burgeoning Sunday night jam downstairs at the Vortex. Lasserson obviously keeps good company.

How the polymath Iverson has hooked up with Lasserson is anyone’s guess but the pianist is a shrewd observer of the scene, and in terms of London is no stranger to the Vortex where the gig is to take place. Iverson four years ago joined Bad Plus drummer Dave King, hipster alto sensation Tim Berne, and cellist Hank Roberts in the very spot for one of the most hardcore improvising gigs ever witnessed at the cutting edge club. Be prepared to stand.
www.vortexjazz.co.uk, Saturday 20 April

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Steve Coleman and Five Elements
Functional Arrhythmias
Pi **** Album of the week
There’s always been a thirst for knowledge with Steve Coleman, and an urge to connect his musical explorations to the wider world. “The title of this recording,” the MBASE originator says in the sleeve notes, “refers to paths of modulating heartbeat-like rhythmic melodies that function similar to the contrapuntal firing of nerve impulses.” And he goes on to explain that the compositions were created spontaneously, then transcribed, and then more improvisations added to “arrive at the final compositions performed by the ensemble.” Coleman credits drummer Milford Graves for his research and music that allowed him to “first become aware of the connection between the biology of the human body, the human soul and music.”

The 14 tracks of Functional Arrhythmias feature the Five Elements in quartet or quintet formation, the main difference between the two settings being the tracks that don’t feature guitarist Miles Okazaki.

Cultured British bassist Anthony Tidd who now lives in the States is back in the Five Elements fold and he plays an important anchoring role throughout but the main drama of the record is the trialogue between saxophone, trumpet, and drums.

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When you hear a Steve Coleman record or see him live (for instance most recently with Reflex during the London Jazz Festival in 2011) the sound is immediately identifiable. After all, Coleman invented a whole sound that has influenced a new generation of what people now loosely call “maths jazz” musicians, or for those longer in the tooth, still MBASE. Musicians such as Tom Challenger and Tom Farmer most recently have followed in the wake of Vijay Iyer and before Vijay got the MBASE bug, Steve Williamson, and Barak Schmool who spread the message to his F-IRE Collective adding to other new ideas.

Its base sound is avant funk with a rough edge mixed in with bebop although as the years have gone by there are few clichés of classic bebop left. On a track such as ‘Medulla-Vagus’ there is an Afro-Cuban layer to the abstract picture Coleman paints (an element Coleman has investigated before extensively), while on an Improv-heavy ballad such as the very stark ‘Chemical Intuition’ once more Coleman’s debt to Bunky Green’s sound comes through, and Jonathan Finlayson manages to channel the late Bill Dixon a little. Sean Rickman plays time and no-time on a track such as ‘Chemical Intuition’, and when trumpet, sax and drums play separate melody and rhythm lines the true no-safety-net improvising approach can be glimpsed. This record is about the naked improvising method customised by Coleman as he explained in his method mentioned earlier. It’s uncompromising, and a worthy successor to Harvesting Semblances and Affinities his first album for Pi.

Last year I was chatting to David Murray at the London Jazz Festival launch briefly and I asked him about Curves of Life, the Paris live album he appeared on with Coleman back in the 1990s. Murray’s eyes lit up, and agreed that he thought it was some of Coleman’s best work. Although Coleman’s music is very different now but just as appealing, its essence is no different to Curves of Life. Rhythm is key, and when blocks and drum rhythms embed themselves behind the loose off-beats and off kilter momentum often implied, as on ‘Cerebrum Crossover’, a tipping point is reached. It’s another language entirely, one that now has many dialects, but Coleman is the source and this fine, inspirational album is a reminder of just what he has to say: and how potent that message still is.

Stephen Graham


Steve Coleman above and the cover of Functional Arrhythmias. Out now

    

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Paul Edis Sextet
There Will Be Time
Jazz action ***
A second release involving 27-year-old north east pianist Paul Edis, following his appearance on ACV’s Babel debut Busk released earlier this month, There Will Be Time, with a clock on the front depicting the timepiece’s hands stuck at eight minutes past ten surrounded by autumnal leaves, is a three-horn sextet full of the spirit of the Jazz Messengers even if the muted trumpet of Graham Hardy on opener ‘Administrate This!’ seems to dig back further stylistically to Rex Stewart or Buck Clayton. There are a dozen tunes, mostly written and arranged by Edis, and it’s pretty orderly modern mainstream stuff: exuberantly brassy on ‘Re: Vamp’, with Edis dismantling his chords behind the plaintive trumpet melody, and drummer Adam Sinclair lending an air of solid authority as he does throughout. Edis can sound like a disciple of Herbie Hancock or Horace Silver at times and favours accessible licks and funky solo lines but perhaps the easy going tempi make the tunes just too digestible. The funky turns and twists on ‘Sharp 9/8’, though, exhibit plenty of spirit and it’s likeable enough fare by a promising pianist. SG