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Tessa Souter
Beyond the Blue
Motéma ****
Released first of all in 2011 in Japan by Venus records but with a different mix, London-born singer Tessa Souter has at last made her mark with a single album following years of her being one to watch, and Beyond the Blue based as it is around the idea of setting new lyrics of hers, for the most part, to celebrated melodies from the classical music popular repertoire, amounts to that long anticipated breakthrough. Souter has a poised, characterful, and in-command style, and there is plenty to savour here not least title track ‘Beyond the Blue’ with Souter’s succinctly satisfying lyrics set to Chopin’s ‘Prelude in E Minor’, and the subtlety of ‘Sunrise’, the singer’s optimistically inclined lyric to the third movement of Brahms’ Third Symphony. Souter’s band on Beyond the Blue is excellent, with pianist Steve Kuhn a connoisseur’s choice as ever, and vibist Joe Locke approachably effusive. Joel Frahm fills the romantic tenor saxophone role beautifully. (Think a slightly more wistful, less worldly wise, Ernie Watts perhaps.) David Finck is a suitably lingering presence on bass, and Billy Drummond comfortably knowing on drums. The little touches from Gary Versace on accordion add more than a certain something as well, and fold in a hint of bal-musette (on the Prince Igor-derived ‘Dance With Me’) that adds to the bygone feel of portions of this fine record. Souter is a singer clearly blessed with a voice to believe in. SG

Out on 4 February. Tessa Souter plays the Pizza Express Jazz Club in London on 9-10 February

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Early-2013 has plenty in store. Wayne Shorter’s Without a Net released on 4 February, as previously discussed in these pages (http://bit.ly/W1Pymr), is a landmark release, its nine tracks engrossing and demanding, and it’s a thrilling ride. Studio track ‘Pegasus’, the Corinthian pillar of this largely live return to Blue Note, is a composition that stands tall with any of Shorter’s best work as a composer. A fortnight later comes the release of The Glimpse (Whirlwind), Robert Mitchell’s piano album for solo left hand available from 18 February, an extraordinary achievement early listens more than suggest, with a dozen tunes featuring the influential pianist on ridiculously fine form. Serious, with a contemplative feel listen out for tracks such as ‘The Sage’, like so many of the other tracks here, a composition that unfolds itself gently but casually delivers a powerful synthesis of abstract thought that always rewards your attention. Marius Neset’s new album Birds will also be a notable pace-setter in the spring. The young Norwegian saxophonist has come up with something special on this Edition/Gearbox release. Read Marlbank for more on this 18 March release in the New Year. Written for the 1927 French film La Proie du vent (translated into English as ‘The Prey of the Wind’), and also inspired by the film music Miles Davis wrote for Lift to the Scaffold quarter tone trumpeter’s Ibrahim Maalouf’s latest album Wind (Mi’ster) is his most mature and imaginative album to date. Meanwhile Swiss French trumpeter Erik Truffaz has also returned impressively with El tiempo de la Revolución (Blue Note France) shortly to gain an official UK release having been released on the Continent earlier and available here as an import. Club friendly, modal, and electronically processed sounds reminiscent of Mark Isham’s 1990s purple patch, Truffaz’s quartet has produced an evocative mood piece that joins the dots between the reimagined 1950s in his head and the “successive revolutions through which our lives are chronicled", as the unsigned note on the sleeve a little loftily suggests. Intelligent dance music through a jazz filter as ever with Truffaz, but this has more edge than his last few albums, and Anna Aaron’s Nico-via-Beth Gibbons vocal touches are a definite plus. The Truffaz quartet plays Ronnie Scott’s on 25 March.

Stephen Graham

Robert Mitchell pictured above

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Bassist Dave Manington’s until now unfathomably under-the-radar band Riff Raff is all set to make a splash in early-2013 with the release of Hullabaloo. Since completing a music degree at Nottingham University and studying at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London, Manington, as one of the founders of the Loop Collective, entered the fray by releasing an album called Headrush on the collective’s label four years ago that garnered quite some praise and made him a new name to watch out for. Part of the Walthamstow scene in north east London his work for the e17 Large Ensemble attracted the attention of close followers of the fertile scene that Riff Raff’s latest will, one would hope, shine further light on. The band besides Manington features singer Brigitte Beraha (generation Walthamstow’s Norma Winstone) who has had a great 2012, picking up acclaim from John Fordham in The Guardian for her word-of-mouth quartet Babelfish (with Barry Green, Chris Laurence and Paul Clarvis). image

Phronesis pianist Ivo Neame also joins the pulse-prevailing Manington on the new album, a big plus, and a continuation of their work together, as does Ma’s Tom Challenger, bluesy guitarist Rob Updegraff, who really lets rip on the title track against the supporting dream-like vocals of Beraha, and finally drummer Tim Giles, formerly of the precocious Hungry Ants many moons ago. Manington has written all the tunes with Beraha contributing lyrics on ‘Catch Me The Moon’, ‘Pedro Bernardo’, and ‘Not A Worthless Thing’. A record to put on the player when Twelfth Night is but a faded memory. SG

Released on 21 January. Dave Manington’s Riff Raff pictured top, and the album’s cover above inset

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The Collins dictionary defines the unusual word ‘trichotomy’ as possessing two meanings: a noun that indicates a division into three categories; and the second in the theological sense “the division of man into body, spirit, and soul.”

The band Trichotomy, led by the smart and charismatic Australian pianist Sean Foran (above centre), has come of age with Fact Finding Mission, their latest album. They are not overly concerned with numbers contrary to definition, and then again you suspect theology is hardly a concern of this band either.

Yet the band’s mathematically inclined name, in another sense of the word to do with order theory, connects it to certain influential currents that are driving jazz forward (think Dice Factory through the filter of Vijay Iyer or “maths jazz" for convenience). But this album is not just about the often fickle zeitgeist. Fact Finding Mission (**** RECOMMENDED) builds hugely on the slightly frustrating promise of Variations, and the much more satisfying album The Gentle War, and the band has shed itself completely of primary influence EST.

Trichotomy’s approach, like EST though, has a humanity to it a world away from mathematics, and there’s a realisation with the choice of the spoken word segments on the title track that some people in power are just plain wrong and even dangerous, hence the voice of what sounds like George W. Bush sampled. This band are as natural as rain: they can’t help it, and that’s the strength of an outfit that allows their musical ideas to convert abstractions into emotion.

It’s drummer John Parker who opens up the album with a solo on ‘Strom’, and Foran comes into his own on the lovely ‘Lullaby’. Bassist Patrick Marchisella starts to figure on the Bad Plus-like build that makes title track ‘Fact Finding Mission’ work, in tandem with Foran’s punchy left hand, and the well handled anger of the piece is paramount. Their most ambitious and in my mind successful album to date Trichotomy have added percussionist Tunji Beier, reeds player Linsey Pollak, and guitarist James Muller for this very fulfilling outing. Muller’s solo on ‘Strom’ kicks in like a Kurt Rosenwinkel epic. A suitably joyful noise, something for the body, spirit, and soul after all. SG

Fact Finding Mission is released by Naim records on 4 February