Elina Duni Quartet
Matanë Malit
ECM ***
It’s always tempting to second guess a label or make sweeping generalisations about their output. Labels with a big release schedule and eclectic tastes, such as ECM’s, regularly by their ambition prove the absurdity of such dragooning of music into neat little phrases. Of course, that’s not to say that everything is individual, again a fairly ludicrous attitude, but certainly this release by the Elina Duni Quartet is unusual. Singer Duni born in the Albanian capital of Tirana in 1981, sings mournfully over a dozen songs on the album, the title of which means ‘Beyond the Mountain’, several of which mine the fairly unknown folk music of her native land. Her Swiss husband Colin Vallon’s trio (its personnel changed now since their Albanian-influenced album Rruga with the trio’s longstanding drummer Samuel Rohrer replaced here by Norbert Pfammatter) is a typically modern European style very quiet piano trio that we’re accustomed to since Tord Gustavsen’s rise to prominence. So it’s library-like in the level of contemplation at play. Duni came to Switzerland in the early-1990s and it’s her collision with the world outside the formerly closed country of Albania through her music that makes this album startling. The quartet has released hard to find albums Baresha and Lume Lume for the tiny Meta Records label which I’ll seek out as clearly the music here on the new album is mature and deepy considered and the journey the musicians have made would be interesting to trace. Patrice Moret, the quartet’s bassist, holds the key to much of the integrating of vocals and trio on Matanë Malit, and it’s clear that Balkan folk songs have rarely sounded so ancient seen through the lens of a very modern artist in Duni.
Stephen Graham

Elina Duni Quartet, pictured above

 

Breach

Borders

breachtrio.com ****

2012 has been a big year for Breach. With touring in the summer that led them to the Rochester Jazz Festival in New York state and Toronto and Vancouver in Canada as well as a run of dates all over England and Scotland recently, their just released new album Borders finds them claim their due place in the sun at last, or as the album cover picture has it, an overcast beach. The album, released on their own Breach label sees guitarist Graeme Stephen also manipulating electronics, with organist Paul Harrison in electronic mode as well, plus drummer/percussionist Chris Wallace testing very interesting waters.

Whether it’s teasing with the melody of ‘In a Sentimental Mood’ on ‘I Smell Something’, or the organ trio format itself, at the heart of the matter, there’s a playfulness at work and plenty of explorative and engaged playing throughout that manages to vault over the stultifying limitations of the format. “Paul Harrison would like to apologise to Duke Ellington”, the drily amusing note puts it, so clearly Breach aren’t up themselves, the latter a factory fault setting in band ego-land quite often. This trio find a way on these eight tracks to dispel nearest easy comparisons (say Lifetime, or to a lesser extent Troyka), and fit in well with the current redefining of how prog fits within jazz. Harrison plays the organ like a synth, if you know what I mean, and that makes all the difference, so he comes over like Gary Husband might with John McLaughlin sometimes, Larry Young very occasionally. There’s less firepower needed as the idea clearly is not a  Heath Robinson-like fusion explosion, and I think that’s where the subtlety of the electronics comes in as well as Stephen’s superb approach to jazz guitar. He plays in the lineage of Phil Robson perhaps more than McLaughlin and there is considerable flexibility and passion in his playing. Take his Celtic rock-like solo on ‘Borders’, say. The tunes are good (‘Judgement’ is the pick of a strong set, especially the ‘bridge’ section there). A fine record from three players who have something that bit different and distinctive to say with their improvising. Seek them out.

Stephen Graham

Pictured, above Breach