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Goran Kajfeš / Subtropic Arkestra
The Reason Why Vol. 1
Headspin ***1/2
Into the spring bulbs will be sprouting to this one given half a chance. The Swede first surfaced in 2001 with the very alert Home, and while Kajfeš has remained an unknown since, at least in terms of more Eeyore-like potting shed-inclined jazz fans, The Reason Why should tempt people away from the garden and on to the dance floor or at least fairly near one. Opener, the trowel friendly but bafflingly titled ‘Yakar Inceden Incedan’ by Edip Akbayram, is an infectiously mighty vamp, and there’s progpsychedelia-into-Afrobeat later, and some unstuffy big band lifts on ‘Badiboom’ (like a Gondwana Mancunian take on Alice Coltrane via Roy Budd), and Soft Machine. By covering Tame Impala (‘Desire Be, Desire Go’) a continuity is established, the torch passed on historically from Soft Machine. Fourth track ‘The Nodder’ from the Softs’ Alive & Well: Recorded in Paris is an interesting choice with a Zawinul Syndicate-type link under Kajfeš’ trumpet and electronics. I’d love to hear the Arkestra plus Anthony Joseph joining as guest vocalist. With support by Sons of Kemet. That would be a night to remember. SG

Update (5/3/13):UK release confirmed for late-April

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Bassist Steve Rodby will be joining The Impossible Gentlemen when the acclaimed band tours again this year.

Dates have still to be announced for the full tour, but the Brecon Jazz Festival in Wales has confirmed that the band will be appearing on the closing night of the festival on 11 August with besides Rodby in the line-up new drummer, the Chicagoan Mark Walker from the jazz and new age band Oregon, taking Adam Nussbaum’s place.

Rodby has produced the latest Basho Records album expected this year, The Impossible Gentlemen’s second outing for Basho records, the north London based label that’s also home to Kit Downes, whose quintet release is a priority in early-2013 http://marlbank.tumblr.com/post/39377045983/1683.

The bassist in the Pat Metheny Group for long periods during the last 30 years, Rodby, 58, who was born in Joliet, Illinois, has produced records for Oregon, Eliane Elias, the Jim Hall & Pat Metheny duo album, and  Pat Metheny Trio albums among many others.

The new IG album was recorded last summer in Sussex following a four-night club residency at London’s Pizza Express Jazz Club in June.

During that lengthy stint The Impossible Gentlemen unveiled new songs from the album they were about to record.

Just three years old now the Gentlemen on their debut were five-string electric bass legend Steve Swallow, distinguished former Sco drummer Adam Nussbaum, piano star Gwilym Simcock, and north west jazz guitar cult hero Mike Walker.

Steve Swallow added new material to the band book performed at the Soho club with an untitled ballad on one night, and other tunes included Walker’s ‘The Slither Of Other Lovers’ and ‘Modern Day Heroes’.

Swallow said at the time, reported exclusively on downbeat.com, the tunes for the record “have very asymmetrical structures but keep their integrity. We have eight new tunes that we’ve worked up in the last eight to 10 days. I have to go through that door so they seem natural like they’re in 4/4 even if they’re not. Moving ahead, it’s a conscious decision to extend.” SG

Steve Rodby above

Update (6/3/13): The Impossible Gentlemen tour dates in the autumn are now understood to be 10-25 October. Founder member Adam Nussbaum will be on drums again for the October dates.

 

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Aaron Diehl
The Bespoke Man’s Narrative
Mack Avenue ****
It’s uncanny, a prologue that summons the mood music of Ahmad Jamal to this feast of a piano album, and then ushers in a new pianist so assured you might think it’s a cruel illusion. In solo (briefly), trio and quartet formations Diehl, only just out of his mid-twenties, has a suave sense of sophistication which the “bespoke” conceit in the title emphasises. He’s clearly saying “I’m a man of taste”, yet instead of sitting around in a gentleman’s club wearing a deerstalker and tweeds he’s happy in a modern armchair Philippe Starck might have designed, with fashionable book shelves lolling (if shelves could so idle) behind him. It’s a slightly contradictory message, but Diehl is more modern than stuck in the past, even if arch Wyntonite Stanley Crouch crops up in the notes shooting from the hip as ever and stating the case strongly for Diehl who he knew at Julliard. Typo of the year so far must be the bit about one “Charge Mingus” in an apt phrase comparing the piano to “tuned bongos”. I’m not sure how “bespoke” the band is, although it does sound very slick befitting of one put together by a Cole Porter fellow in jazz composition, an award bestowed on Diehl by the American Pianists Association. Vibist Warren Wolf is as dependable as ever as is drummer Rodney Green with the up-and-coming David Wong nimble on bass. The trio tracks are good hearty fare but it’s slightly paradoxical that the main album highlight is very possibly the convincing solo version of Ellington’s ‘Single Petal of a Rose’ (also covered recently by the Scottish National Jazz Orchestra). ‘Bess You Is My Woman Now’ is cleverly approached and very expressive, and the treatment of Ravel’s ‘Le Tombeau de Couperin [III. Forlane]’ weighted very thoughtfully and sequenced well. Diehl has made a statement here that’s much more than a sartorial one, although he might have to keep on changing his musical clothes for a while yet to get really comfortable.
Stephen Graham 

Released on 18 March. Aaron Diehl, above

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Not fantasy but reality. Fifty years ago in April Capitol records would release Jazz Moments a George Shearing record few would care to quickly forget. It would be a momentous session.

Instead of a vibes quintet, which the pianist was already renowned for, Shearing would assemble a trio, drafting in none other than Ahmad Jamal’s bassist Israel Crosby and drummer Vernel Fournier, two thirds of the At The Pershing: But Not For me dream team.

Sadly Jazz Moments would be Crosby’s last recording, an early departure for a bassist actually born the same year as Shearing, but who later in 1963 would suffer a heart attack and die aged just 43. Crosby had made his mark on the jazz scene with Gene Krupa in the 30s before going down to create jazz history with Jamal and Fournier at the Pershing hotel.

John Turville returns for the second instalment of The Shearing Hour on Thursday evening, a piano hour that begins and ends with the inspiration of Sir George Shearing (1919-2011). Take your seats for 7.15. SG

Listen to the trio here play ‘The Mood is Mellow’ from Jazz Moments: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4w7-87uJ4xA

Book at www.pizzaexpresslive.co.uk
/more: www.theshearinghour.tumblr.com

there’s never been a better time

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With the deeply concerning upsurge in support for Euroscepticism of late stoked by the sentimentalism of a hopeless little Englandism and mischief-making in the populist press, a new series of concerts and wider discussion events soon couldn’t come at a better time. The Time and the Place: Culture and Identity in Today’s Europe at Kings Place connects the distant past with the present across national boundaries and cultures featuring artists as distinctive in their own fields as gypsy violinist Roby Farkas and Budapest Bár, saxophonist/MC Soweto Kinch, and Mari Boine (top).

The Kings Place series in London features performance events, discussions and exhibitions with funding from the Humanities in the European Research Area’s (HERA) Joint Research programme working in association with live music producers Serious.

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The HERA network operates across 18 countries and strives for excellence in the humanities, pushing research forward. Events include Budapest Bár with special guests, on 30 May in Hall 1;  Poul Høxbro – Tones and Tales from Distant Lands + Fraser Fifield on 31 May in Hall Two; Soweto Kinch: Urban Landscape also on 31 May in Hall 1; Gianluigi Trovesi and Gianni Coscia (above) on 1 June in Hall Two; and Mari Boine also 1 June, in Hall 1.

Stephen Graham

More details and how to book: www.kingsplace.co.uk

The Scottish National Jazz Orchestra
In the Spirit of Duke
Spartacus ***1/2
There is a new creative wave of interest in the music of Duke Ellington at the moment, and if anything the crest of the breakers won’t fully crash on to the obliging beaches of the global jazz community until next year, the fortieth anniversary of the death of the great composer and bandleader.

None of the notable projects though by Terri Lyne Carrington, Mark Lockheart, and others in this zeitgeist, strive for the authenticity that In the Spirit of Duke does. The orchestra’s director and tenor saxophone inspiration Tommy Smith in his sleeve note talks about the pains he went to in this regard: “I managed to get my hands on some authentic mutes from America”, he even writes, and Smith settled to transcribe a small mountain of music including tunes found in movie music and at concerts. Smith was also able to draw on first hand experience performing with Ellingtonians in the Ellington Legacy Orchestra, and on his own record The Sound of Love made a major contribution to new jazz inspired by the master long after the death of Ellington had been mourned in the 1970s.

In the Spirit of Duke was recorded live in Scotland as recently as October and mixed weeks later by Jan Erik Kongshaug in Norway, the great ECM engineer. Not surprisingly the album has meticulous sound and the performances match, with the enthusiasm of audiences adding another decisive element. There’s some fine soloing, notably from Smith himself on album closer ‘Diminuendo in Blue [Wailing Interval] Crescendo in Blue’, Brian Kellock, Ryan Quigley, and Ru Pattison. Fine drummer Alyn Cosker shows his mettle on ‘Diminuendo’, and elsewhere, as does ever Braveheart-like Calum Gourlay who audiences south of the border know only too well for his maraudingly impressive bass forays with Kit Downes among others. This new SNJO album has spirit and energy, but it’s aimed more at connoisseurs of Ellington’s music than for those not naturally drawn to reminisce in tempo so don’t expect postmodern reinvention as there’s none of that here. Do expect lots of energy, consummate musicianship and some jumping for joy: it’s what the music demands after all. SG

Released on 13 March

The cover of In The Spirit of Duke, above

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Jay’s Jitter Jive dance night begins at The Hippodrome casino on Charing Cross Road, just yards from Leicester Square on Wednesday with trumpeter Jay Phelps leading his eight-piece band featuring Lauren Dalrymple on vocals, and Perry Louis, of Jazzcotech renown, leading the dance moves.

Jay, acting a role as one of two trumpeters in the Louis Lester Band, and also on the hit soundtrack of Adrian Johnston’s music for the Dancing on the Edge band, and whose own debut as a leader Jay Walkin’ came out to good reviews in 2010, did a trial run for Jitter Jive just before the end of 2012 at Kings Place. On his website he says speaking of the night at the prestigious York Way venue: “We had a great time playing the music of the era, and we even included three tunes from the Snakehips Johnson band transcribed by Soweto Kinch.”

On recent BBC2 documentary Swinging into the Blitz the death was grippingly recalled of Ken ‘Snakehips’ Johnson, who was among the many to die in the Blitzed-out West End night club Café de Paris, just a few hundred yards from the Hippodrome, on 8 March 1941. Jay performed in the documentary band sequences recreating the Snakehips sound as did Soweto Kinch who has a new record out, The Legend of Mike Smith, released last week, and Jay appears on it in one of the best spots of the whole affair on the ballad ‘Vacuum’, his horn set alongside the elegiac piano of Julian Joseph. SG

Jay’s Jitter Jive is a regular night and the second presentation follows on 27 March. More at http://www.hippodromecasino.com

Jitter jive special: Jay Phelps top

Watch some Cab Calloway jitterbug jive http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N06KxYyUZkk

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The historic newly reactivated jazz label Okeh has revealed that it is to issue a solo piano album by the highly rated jazz and classical pianist from the Dominican Republic, Michel Camilo, to be called What’s Up, on 13 May.

This latest album by the Grammy winning band leader follows on from his 2011 trio album Mano a Mano.

Camilo will appear at Ronnie Scott’s in London just ahead of release on 10-11 May with his trio of Cliff Almond and Lincoln Goines.

Camilo in the mid-1980s debuted with Why Not? and his albums Michel Camilo, On Fire, and On the Other Hand were widely played on jazz radio stations in the States, where he had earlier studied at Julliard in New York city.

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Bob James and David Sanborn are also to release Quartette Humaine on Okeh, an acoustic quartet album with James Genus and Steve Gadd, the label has intimated. That’s all set for a 20 May release in the UK.

James and Sanborn worked together with Gadd, plus Marcus Miller and Al Jarreau among others, on hit album Double Vision, a landmark release in the early years of smooth jazz.

Before those releases there’s a various artists album on the blocks called Dalla in Jazz, a tribute to the Bologna-born Italian singer/songwriter Lucio Dalla who wrote monster hit ‘Caruso’ covered by artists as disparate as Maynard Ferguson and (in a multi-million selling version) Luciano Pavarotti.

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Dalla in Jazz features trumpeter Paolo Fresu recently touring in the UK with the Scottish National Jazz Orchestra and whose Devil Quartet album Desertico has just appeared. Saxophonist Stefano di Battista, and singer Maria Pia De Vito, known for her work with both Huw Warren and Colin Towns also appear on this tribute to Dalla, who died last year. It’s released on 6 May.

But first there’s a new release date for A Different Time, John Medeski’s solo piano album now confirmed for 9 April.

Big Sur, the much anticipated new Bill Frisell album, will be released by Okeh on 3 June. SG

Michel Camilo, top; Bob James with David Sanborn, middle; and Paolo Fresu, above

Further Okeh background as the story unfolded:

http://marlbank.tumblr.com/post/34825030411/9284moa

http://marlbank.tumblr.com/post/37628707140/2837

For Ronnie Scott’s dates: http://www.ronniescotts.co.uk/performances/view/1212-michel-camilo-trio

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The last Keith Jarrett solo concert in London at the Royal Festival Hall in 2008 became two thirds of the triple album Paris/London: Testament, and memories of that extraordinary night run high still.

Manfred Eicher, founder in 1969 of ECM, Jarrett’s long time label and where the story of his global success began in solo piano terms with the studio album Facing You, speaking in the foyer of the Hall beforehand smiled at the mention of Testament, and recalled it was recorded in Paris as well. “We’re recording tonight,” he said, having made the trip over to be in the hall in person. Jarrett is still finding new audiences, and the National Concert Hall concert in Dublin on Thursday was his first in Ireland in 30 years. Imagine hearing Keith Jarrett for the very first time. 

Like the Testament night that distant December Jarrett started with a wild improvisation, a clearing for what would follow. He could have played in that vein all night as he does on albums such as Radiance, but this was not an improv set in its entirety.

Most of the songs particularly in the second set after the official interval were lovely ballads or ballad-inclined leavened with the gospel-tinged blues: the left hand on one such number showed the groove set-up Jarrett did on such classics as ‘Long As You’re Living Yours’ players such as Brad Mehldau have done much to learn from.

Jarrett only name checked one song, ‘Summertime’, and launched into an anecdote about the night he first played the Gershwin number, a perennial favourite with jazz audiences the world over since Porgy and Bess. It was a night in San Francisco he said when he played the tune for the first time in front of an audience. Jarrett explained that that particular crowd was an unruly one, and he had to take requests and bit by bit the troublemakers melted away. Later Robin Williams came backstage to see him afterwards and congratulated him on getting shot of the troublemakers. Jarrett impersonated the Good Morning Vietnam man’s voice, and then laughed at his own impersonation.

The second half showed a hitherto little known aspect of Jarrett’s public persona: he told jokes and people in the audience laughed. It was a relief, as there is always massive tension at Jarrett gigs, partly why it’s fair to say even if the concerts are demanding they’re so good.

During the first set he left the stage quite early on as he had to take a “two minutes” break. He mentioned “medicines” that he had been taking, and he was gone for about five minutes. That gave the audience a chance to chat to friends or strangers sitting next to them after the enforced stifling silence demanded at his concerts.

Later after the official interval when the man from Allentown came back for the second half referred back to the unscheduled break and the medicines earlier mentioned that people had given him advice on what remedies he should take. He had a cold as it turned out. He said his response to the advice was: “all of them!”

Someone inevitably took pictures despite a very polite announcement by John Cumming of the concert producers Serious at the very beginning. The snapping began shortly after he took the stage for the second set, and the good humour on Jarrett’s part could have dissipated, but didn’t, although Jarrett did say archly that photography is a great art but taking photos on “equipment like that” meaning presumably camera phones “doesn’t make great art.”

People did continue to take pictures bafflingly, even after this, and later on. The Festival Hall was packed, and even the choir stalls sold so Jarrett had people to the left side of him above his head curving round to the sides. The piano position was different to the time he did the Testament concert (the Steinway last night was side on, a lot straighter), and his body language was a bit different as sometimes he sits at the piano almost side saddle at an angle. Sometimes in his posture last night the shape was like an anglepoise lamp. At the beginning of Pixar films there is a short animated sequence and the anglepoise lamp hops about. Jarrett doesn’t hop about, but he does stand up a lot, and the first thing he did last night, was to look inside the piano and reach out to the strings. He vocalised quite a bit as well throughout, humming and sort of singing.

There were four encores at the end, including ‘Miss Otis Regrets’, but most of the great moments came earlier especially on the tune that sounded like the melody of an old 1970s ballad ‘Sometimes When We Touch’ in the theme. Whatever it is called this one was the most beautiful. There was another tune that could have turned into ‘Here’s To Life’. Jarrett isn’t averse to popular songs from more recent times, and on Jasmine, the duo studio album with Charlie Haden, there’s a very good version of Joe Sample and Will Jennings’ ‘One Day I’ll Fly Away’. Another of last night’s songs had a fine flamenco section (think the spirit of Miles Davis’ Sketches of Spain). As raconteur in the second half his anecdote about Nürnberg was the most interesting. Maybe it was the March 1973 concert he was referring to, the same year as Solo Concerts Bremen Lausanne made less than 16 months after Facing You. Jarrett said in the university auditorium on that occasion the audience were up close to him. That night, he went on, he said that he was ill (as he was last night) not helped by bad food “Chinese food made by Italians”, as he put it, that he and “my producer here tonight” meaning Manfred Eicher had eaten ahead of the concert all those years ago, but they liked the music made that night. The inference was clear: even though he didn’t feel well it wouldn’t stop the music being good. The most famous instance of this was the later masterpiece The Köln Concert when he had not only eaten bad food beforehand, but had a bad back and was tired after travelling. Last night’s concert wasn’t a classic, but there were many beautiful moments, one or two of these quite moving. The record when it comes out eventually will tell a different story as live records often do with all the extra detail. But no one can forget hearing Keith Jarrett play.

Stephen Graham

UPDATED with setlist added at 6.15

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Draw a line in the sand from Soft Machine to well out into the sea. The tide may have changed many thousands of times since the late-1960s, yet prog jazz or the nuprog, emanating in the Canterbury sound, and more especially psychedelic rock, is increasingly where it’s at in terms of the new wave of experimental Britjazz. It has been for a while. Prog began to be reclaimed after the term became derided for many years as its creativity waned and became bloated and identified with ELP and god help us Rick Wakeman. Psychedelic prog is really at the heart of the matter and it’s very different to say Jon Hiseman’s more jazz-rock approach back in the day. There are only a few bands who come under the banner, you can’t really fake it unless somebody decides to add a click track to it and loads of vocals. So there’s Troyka and World Service Project, and Polar Bear more elliptically. The jazz influences that feed in are very disparate. There’s probably Weather Report in there, big dollops of M-BASE, and spoonfuls of Django Bates and wistful nods to King Crimson.

WSP export the concept all over the place via Match & Fuse, the name east London web producer Lee Paterson dreamt up brainstorming with the band driven by the visionary and well organised Dave Morecroft.

The idea is to link WSP with bands who don’t happen to live their lives in a Redditch potting shed, or whatever the equivalent is in Caen or Stavanger, or play bowls on the village green or discuss the finer points of wood burning in their spare time. These bands include Twin Peaks‘-loving Owls Are Not What They Seem, and the pick of the bunch Pixel, from Norway, now signed to Soft Machine-loving US experimental label Cuneiform.

In arts-speak Match & Fuse has a “primary aim of connecting creative scenes across Europe", which it sort of does. After touring England with Matt Jacobsen’s “two horns/no chords" boffins Redivider last year and playing the Gillett Square M & F all dayer to good effect they hook up with Redivider again this time in Ireland next month. Dates are Dolan’s, Limerick (7 March); Crane Lane Theatre Cork (8 March); and The Twisted Pepper, Dublin (10 March). SG

World Service Project, above

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Alex Wilson
Trio

Alex Wilson Records ***1/2
A prisoner to his big technique and eclecticism at times, the trio format suits Wilson well although the sequencing here doesn’t do him any favours. Big, booming number ‘Kalisz’ named for Paweł Brodowski’s piano festival in Poland is an early peak (it might have been better at the end) but ‘Remercier les travailleurs’ with its Malian lilt is less overly energetic and all the better for it, allowing bassist Davide Mantovani more scope. It’s great to hear drummer Frank Tontoh in a trio setting on an album again, although you can often hear him in clubs such as Hideaway regularly. Recorded live in London and at the Warwick Arts Centre in Coventry, as well as in studios in the capital, the danzón take on ‘Solar’ is a clever departure, and listen hard and you’ll find plenty to enjoy. Not sure about some of the tinkling applause at the beginning of some of the tracks as it makes everything resemble a vicar’s tea party. That’s not much of a drawback on an otherwise effortless sounding release by a pianist clearly hitting his stride.
Released on 15 April

Caswell Sisters
Alive in the Singing Air

Turtle Ridge Records ***
Their first full album together, sisters Rachel and Sara Caswell (Rachel’s the pure-voiced singer, and Sara the intuitive violinist), are joined by a piano trio led by the great Fred Hersch, and that’s the chief interest on this album. But there’s another connection as ‘Song of Life’ and the standout track ‘A Wish’ (introduced beautifully by Hersch) have words by Norma Winstone and music by Hersch. The very influential educator David Baker taught both sisters, and I’m sure he will find a lot to savour on this highly accomplished album. Chamber jazz, but that bit different.
Released on 5 March in the US

Bobby Avey
Be Not So Long To Speak
Minsi Ridge Records ***
The title is a bit clunky, almost a half sentence invented by a bot, but this solo piano album recorded in New York in 2011 with a fairly anonymous wiggy head of hair covering the monochrome cover deserves your attention. It may be overly serious at times and a bit full-on but ‘Late November’ joins the dots more with heavy holds and dark momentum. But listen to Hoagy Carmichael’s ‘Stardust’ tucked in at the end before Avey’s own tunes and you’ll get what he’s doing that bit more. Having to acclimatise to this very different sound via a familiar tune makes this slightly odd album by an original thinker that bit easier to grasp.
On release

The Ian Carey Quintet + 1
Roads and Codes
Kabocha Records ***
Heavily influenced by Dave Douglas but with a slightly airier sound, trumpeter Carey did the whole of this album in a day with his band in a San Francisco studio, and it benefits from the real time method at work. More people across the Atlantic are remarking on just how much Kenny Wheeler has influenced them and are playing his tunes and Carey’s the latest. Carey’s own tune ‘Wheels’ here is another tribute, a hipster waltz, that works on more than a name-checking level. Carey, who’s on flugel as well as trumpet, might not have the bite of a player like Tom Arthurs on the instrument but he has a lost-in-the-mirror haze to his style that is really appealing. Inspired by Jim Jarmusch, and Charles Ives as well as Wheeler, there’s nothing stuck in the mud about this young player and his band. SG
On release

The Alex Wilson Trio top

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There’s no more erudite a jazz writer and critic than Brian Morton, in his use of language as a treasure chest, rather than a toolbox, his pen a much needed scalpel for criticism to root out the malign or facilitate the benign, his ear attuned to the kind of phrase you just wished you yourself could have come up with. He also, with the late Richard Cook in the Penguin Guide to Jazz, picked up on new music and then called the shots: like an expert in the paddock looking at how a young colt is shaping up or as an observer stating something obvious yet that no-one has hitherto chosen to express. Brian used to speak of “lost leaders", he probably still does; and would cite a range of greats who qualified: Krzysztof Komeda; Jan Johansson; and Eric Dolphy among them.

Bill Evans was hardly a lost leader but his bassist Scott LaFaro, who died aged 25 in a car crash, most definitely was in the Morton sense. Although no one can really be sure how his career in music would have unfolded, if following a remarkable series of concerts at the Village Vanguard in New York in 1961 he hadn’t died at such a young age. A new novel by Welsh writer Owen Martell takes up the facts and adds the fiction interpreting how LaFaro’s life affected Bill Evans and his family. Intermission takes its title from the crisis in Evans’ life as he was gripped by the trauma of the loss of LaFaro. Boyd Tonkin writing in The Independent says: “Like Evans’ own music, Intermission might prove simply too rarefied and intangible for some tastes; too disdainful of the sweet chords and easy resolutions of major-key story-telling.” He does compare the book favourably to Michael Ondaatje’s novel Coming through Slaughter about fabled trumpeter Buddy Bolden, another “lost leader”, whose memory has become putty in the hands of myth makers notably Wynton Marsalis.

Half-Blood Blues author Esi Edugyan reviewing Intermission in The Guardian today says more directly that Martell’s book is “an introspective, original novel”, and that it concerns family grief as much as it does  the idolising of a musician. She also says: “At its best, this novel stands as a well-written lament… an apt tribute to a music so full of life that even a pause, a silence, can go down howling.”

Morton in the seclusion of bucolic windswept Argyll these days would add some prescient comments of his own on a book about loss and its overthrow of leadership: buffeting jazz in 1961 and an ocean of music since.

Stephen Graham