Tonight Jazz Line-Up on BBC Radio 3 broadcasts a programme that was recorded yesterday as part of the station’s piano season and celebrates the 70th birthday of pianist John Taylor. One of the most influential and revered pianists in UK jazz history, an influence on a young generation of international musicians as well as the possessor of a healthy critical reputation around the world, John Taylor since the late-1960s has been a leading fixture on the international jazz scene as a player, bandleader, recording artist and educator. Emerging initially alongside such players as tenor saxophonist Alan Skidmore, the Manchester-born musician whose style has a still self-completeness to it, English, yet of no country, cerebral at times, but with a warmth that draws people in.

The solo pieces at the beginning of the concert, which included ‘Coniston’, and ‘Ambleside’, with their evocation of the places and people of the Lake District, as Taylor explained in conversation with presenter Claire Martin, were a jolt in terms of immediacy and distinctive style with their deftly probing improvising lines drawn from the pools of the pianist’s experience.

It’s not surprising in the least the influence Taylor has had on a new generation of players, including pianist Richard Fairhurst (well known recently for his work with trumpeter Tom Arthurs), who later in the concert joined Taylor to perform some arranged pieces for two pianos including the evening’s highlight for me, a beautiful rendition of Bill Evans’ ‘Turn Out The Stars’, with Taylor’s modal grasp a thing to behold as Fairhurst carried the melody line. On the broadcast Taylor is on the left of the stereo image, and Fairhurst on the right.

After the initial solo pieces heard at the concert Taylor was joined by Spin Marvel drummer Martin France, saxophonist Julian Siegel of Partisans, and Chris Laurence on bass, the latter known for his longstanding work with Taylor but also with Andy Sheppard for many years. Laurence and Taylor clearly showed their mutual empathy and the extended range to his double bass, sparingly used, captured some sense of the satisfying stillness that Taylor’s writing seems to bring out as did his mobility on ‘Calypso 53’ inspired by Kurt Vonnegut.

Late in the concert Sons of Kemet tuba player Oren Marshall joined Taylor for a duo, and then became part of the ensemble, adding an extra sonic dimension to a programme that had surprising width, but nonetheless was only a small glimpse of Taylor’s musical world. His roots in Evansiana were one of the main features for sure, and recent tunes such as music from last year’s Requiem for A Dreamer were quite superb.

Stephen Graham

The programme begins at ten minutes before midnight http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006tnmw