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Last week on Marlbank I wrote about Simon Spillett’s new album Square One and commented: “Spillett is a self confessed purist and recently this comment was attributed to him: ‘Jazz will only survive if people are exposed to the music in its purest form.’ Disputing that this thinking isn’t particularly helpful, “as it requires someone to step forward and presumably spell out what jazz purism is”, I went on to question the need for jazz in its purest form and suggested its historic hybrid nature, and broad international and stylistic appeal, mitigated against such an attitude that Spillett maintained. I also said: “You can draw a line back via pianist John Critchinson here to Ronnie Scott’s regular band, which Critch for many years was a member of, and long before that back to the Scott and Tubby Hayes co-led Jazz Couriers," and that Spillett’s quartet kept “the Hayes spirit well and truly alive" before going on to praise the “high standard" and “enjoyable nature" of the playing with its “unfettered drive from Clark Tracey who sounds as if he’s in his element.” There was a little speculation in the article, which you can read in full here, that Square One will stir debate and sure enough it has, with Simon Spillett himself getting in touch with his reaction. “I deliberately avoided any heavy Tubby Hayes connections on this album and yet what does the first reviewer pick up on? The point is, I don’t want to have to keep defending my right to play in a style that isn’t up at ‘da cutting edge, man’. I don’t really care what the critics think of my ‘approach’ as long as I’m playing as well as I can. I’m not consciously thinking of turning back the clock, restoring old values or of looking like I’m standing by Barnes bridge in 1962. You don’t have the luxury of that when you’re trying to make a living!” SG