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Alex Wilson
Trio

Alex Wilson Records ***1/2
A prisoner to his big technique and eclecticism at times, the trio format suits Wilson well although the sequencing here doesn’t do him any favours. Big, booming number ‘Kalisz’ named for Paweł Brodowski’s piano festival in Poland is an early peak (it might have been better at the end) but ‘Remercier les travailleurs’ with its Malian lilt is less overly energetic and all the better for it, allowing bassist Davide Mantovani more scope. It’s great to hear drummer Frank Tontoh in a trio setting on an album again, although you can often hear him in clubs such as Hideaway regularly. Recorded live in London and at the Warwick Arts Centre in Coventry, as well as in studios in the capital, the danzón take on ‘Solar’ is a clever departure, and listen hard and you’ll find plenty to enjoy. Not sure about some of the tinkling applause at the beginning of some of the tracks as it makes everything resemble a vicar’s tea party. That’s not much of a drawback on an otherwise effortless sounding release by a pianist clearly hitting his stride.
Released on 15 April

Caswell Sisters
Alive in the Singing Air

Turtle Ridge Records ***
Their first full album together, sisters Rachel and Sara Caswell (Rachel’s the pure-voiced singer, and Sara the intuitive violinist), are joined by a piano trio led by the great Fred Hersch, and that’s the chief interest on this album. But there’s another connection as ‘Song of Life’ and the standout track ‘A Wish’ (introduced beautifully by Hersch) have words by Norma Winstone and music by Hersch. The very influential educator David Baker taught both sisters, and I’m sure he will find a lot to savour on this highly accomplished album. Chamber jazz, but that bit different.
Released on 5 March in the US

Bobby Avey
Be Not So Long To Speak
Minsi Ridge Records ***
The title is a bit clunky, almost a half sentence invented by a bot, but this solo piano album recorded in New York in 2011 with a fairly anonymous wiggy head of hair covering the monochrome cover deserves your attention. It may be overly serious at times and a bit full-on but ‘Late November’ joins the dots more with heavy holds and dark momentum. But listen to Hoagy Carmichael’s ‘Stardust’ tucked in at the end before Avey’s own tunes and you’ll get what he’s doing that bit more. Having to acclimatise to this very different sound via a familiar tune makes this slightly odd album by an original thinker that bit easier to grasp.
On release

The Ian Carey Quintet + 1
Roads and Codes
Kabocha Records ***
Heavily influenced by Dave Douglas but with a slightly airier sound, trumpeter Carey did the whole of this album in a day with his band in a San Francisco studio, and it benefits from the real time method at work. More people across the Atlantic are remarking on just how much Kenny Wheeler has influenced them and are playing his tunes and Carey’s the latest. Carey’s own tune ‘Wheels’ here is another tribute, a hipster waltz, that works on more than a name-checking level. Carey, who’s on flugel as well as trumpet, might not have the bite of a player like Tom Arthurs on the instrument but he has a lost-in-the-mirror haze to his style that is really appealing. Inspired by Jim Jarmusch, and Charles Ives as well as Wheeler, there’s nothing stuck in the mud about this young player and his band. SG
On release

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