Paul Dunlea

In a word to answer the question above, plenty. Site to bookmark for instance: Dublin promoter IMC runs an Irish scene listings service. The list at the moment details regular Dublin jazz jam sessions at the Grand Social and Arthur’s on Mondays, an improv special with trombonist Paul Dunlea, above, in Cork at the Crane Lane on Tuesdays and a host of other gigs dotted around Ireland. The website address is here.
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Another listings site Jazz Ireland is also available for a bird’s eye view of the ever developing scene.

 

Look for the latest from the distinguished trumpeter Wallace Roney setting the autumn agenda big time in a classic hard bop direction first listens suggest. To be issued on the High Note label as summer fades into early autumn when the full album is out saxophonist Emilio Modeste, pianist Oscar Williams II, bassist Paul Cuffari, and drummer Kojo Odu Roney are on Blue Dawn, Blue Nights made at Van Gelder’s in New Jersey. Guitarist Quintin Zoto and drummer Lenny White complete the album collective personnel. 

Wallace Roney emerged from the Ali’s Alley scene as a teen. With Miles he appeared on Miles and Quincy Live at Montreux. Roney is and remains a global force to be reckoned with. These sonic glimpses underline that. The countdown begins. 

 

From the press release:

“The nominations have today been announced for the 2019 Parliamentary Jazz Awards.The Awards, organised by the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG) with the support of PizzaExpress Live.

The nominees include a broad array of jazz talent from the UK jazz scene.

The award categories reflect the ever-increasing scope of talent from within the UK’s jazz scene: Jazz Vocalist of the Year; Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year; Jazz Album of the Year; Jazz Ensemble of the Year; Jazz Newcomer of the Year; Jazz Venue of the Year; Jazz Media Award; Jazz Education Award; and the Services to Jazz Award.

Following the online public vote for the Awards, the shortlist was then voted upon by a selection panel, who represent a broad cross-section of backgrounds united in their passion and knowledge of jazz. The winners, chosen by judging members of the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG), will be announced at the awards ceremony at PizzaExpress Live, Holborn, London on Tuesday 3rd  December 2019.

Kelvin Hopkins MP, Co-Chair of APPJAG, said: These shortlists demonstrate the wealth of talent and commitment that exists in the British jazz scene. Now in its 15th year, the Parliamentary Jazz Awards honours the best of British jazz. MPs and Peers in the All Party Group are delighted to host another ceremony at Pizza Express Live and we are extremely grateful to PizzaExpress Live for supporting the event.”

Jazz Vocalist of the Year

Claire Martin

Georgia Mancio

Cherise Adams-Burnett

Zoe Gilby

Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year

Brian Kellock

Nikki Iles

Jason Rebello

Josephine Davies

Jazz Album of the Year

Sons Of Kemet  – “Your Queen Is A Reptile”

Adrian Cox – “Profoundly Blue”

Fergus McCreadie – “Turas”

Jean Toussaint – “Brother Raymond”

Jazz Ensemble of the Year

Ezra Collective

London Vocal Project

Gareth Lockrane Big Band

Jazz Newcomer of the Year

Xhosa Cole

Fergus McCreadie

Luca Manning

Jazz Venue of the Year

Marsden Jazz Festival

Bebop Club, Bristol

Watermill Jazz Club, Dorking

Verdict Jazz Club, Brighton

Jazz Media Award

Jazzwise Magazine

Kevin Le Gendre

Ian Mann – Jazzmann

Jazz Education Award

Pete Churchill

Jamil Sheriff

Nikki Iles

Services to Jazz Award

Henry Lowther

John Fordham

Dame Cleo Laine”

Marlbank asked what the dates are, in which city they will take place, and if there will be a separate jazz event as in some recent years. Henk Elzenga, a director of the MOBOs replied by email: “We are hoping to bring the Awards back in November – we are working on it and will need to know soon. A day and venue have been pencilled in yet funding is the challenge. Not sure at this point what and if we can do anything around gospel and jazz specifically for that same reason.” SG 

Remember how Rymden appeared so stirringly earlier this year? Cast your minds back. 

Dan Berglund, above left, Bugge Wesseltoft and Magnus Öström whose Reflections and Odysseys was an 8 February release. In terms of tick boxes: yes to absorbing metrical investigation, lots of electricity, big bass and energetic drums. No however to navel gazing and ponderous pomposity which often bedevils prog-jazz.

This style is the antithesis of ambient Nordic spaciousness and it is a busy sound. On a tune like ‘Pitter Patter’ however you can source the sound back to say Chick Corea because Wesseltoft using the Rhodes electric piano knows that terrain inside out and manages to sound ahead of the game even when the sound of the Rhodes is everywhere this last decade.

‘The Lugubrious Youth of Lucky Luke’ is probably the most EST-like of all the tunes, a slow ballad that takes its time to unfold after a folk-ish opening melodic mood is established by Wesseltoft on piano with almost a country lilt to it.

‘Homegrown’ in a major rather than minor mood at the end is a beauty and shows this band are not afraid to use warm and rich melody, cadences to die for, to their advantage without being at all twee.

If you are an EST fan you will see how time is a healer and how too Bugge Wesseltoft is the perfect person to harness the beauty of that band and paint new pictures with the spirit and all that heart. Everything glues together which may have been the hope but certainly to these ears is the reality. SG 

Rymden are headliners on the final night of this autumn’s Punkt held over 5-7 September. 

A digital format piano and alto saxophone duo album recorded at Trinity Laban in south east London towards the end of 2016 is on release. ‘Majolica’ is a taut beginning grounded by Maguire’s very abstract sense of harmony. The pianist begins ‘Smooth Your Feathers’ in a more gentle, ruminative and balladic way: Martin Speake typically Konitz and Ornette Coleman-like in the sense not necessarily of timbre but in the jagged overlapping saxophone lines he creates.

‘Just One Look’ continues the conversational approach while ‘Prana’ is more celebratory, a fanfare from Speake to begin. Then ‘Mellow Eightpence’ is so quiet at the beginning and a memorable very pretty initial theme is developed straight off: the duo seem to be freest here in the ultimate sense of playing and not thinking... and yet are so lucid and creative.

‘Six Sisters’ again sits in simple melody and goes quiet as if time and silence (often the ultimate desire to achieve in every kind of music making either as means or outcome) are forefront in the mind’s eye.

‘Eau de Nil’ and later ‘Different Roads’ are where the album really gets interesting in terms of the piano lines. The Bley-esque Maguire thrives on the homespun aspect to ‘The Next Stage’ and we are back to the Konitz universe to an extent on ‘Wounded Landscape’ but Speake takes it a step further and this track is a wilderness of bass lines and rampaging bar-vaulting fourths and eighths juggling illusive atonality or tonality in its grandeur.

‘Dottles’ is free improv in the plinky plonky sense should you choose to use that phrase advisedly — I am being as accurate as possible and not pejorative — and as for the final five tracks: where they work best is when they find a simple theme which they often do and ornament it. ‘Armistice Sorry To Be Me’ is superb (‘Green Light’ the only weak track in an album of 16 tracks) and ‘Embrace’ finds Speake — think beyond style in a Britjazz timeline of alto sax icons: John Dankworth; Joe Harriott; Speake; Soweto Kinch — at his epic best. SG

Available via Bandcamp ***

The line-up for the Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of the Soho Jazz Week on the Soho-Live site is now available.

Wed 11 September 
Artists include Ashley Henry, Jo Harrop and Cherise Adam Burnett. Full list
Thurs 12 September
Artists include Christian Brewer, Aydenne Simone and KoKo Collective. Full list
Fri 13 September
Artists include Andy Davies, Quentin Collins, Kitty la Roar and her trio. Full list

The Soho.Live Jazz Week website is here.

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From the upcoming 16 August release of Crepuscule In Nickelsdorf by Trance Map+: Evan Parker, Matthew Wright, Adam Linson, John Coxon and Ashley Wales.

A seven part mix of field recordings, samples from cassettes, turntable scratching and live processing of Evan Parker saxophone recordings collective personnel are: Evan Parker, soprano saxophone; Matthew Wright, turntable, live sampling; Adam Linson, double bass, electronics; John Coxon, turntable, electronics; Ashley Wales, electronics. Think of the tracks so far as somehow conjuring a 21st century Turner electroacoustic seascape in a void far from home, all sense of reality upended in the churning turbulence of dreams.

Nerija

Enjoying critical acclaim and now experiencing initial sales success, Nérija top the UK official jazz & blues album chart — a significant achievement. 

Nérija are Nubya Garcia (tenor saxophone), Sheila Maurice-Grey (trumpet), Cassie Kinoshi (alto saxophone), Rosie Turton (trombone), Shirley Tetteh (guitar), Lizy Exell (drums) and Rio Kai (bass). Blume was released on 2 August.

Check out the woozy hard bop and Afrobeat-flavoured ‘Riverfest’ from the album, above.