Nadje Noordhuis

Nadje Noordhuis

Little Mystery Records ***

Another of the burgeoning new-melodic school, trumpet/flugel player Nadje Noordhuis, from Sydney, based in New York since 2008, was a semi-finalist in the Thelonious Monk competition the year before.

In her mid-thirties, a member of underground jazz composer Darcy James Argue’s Secret Society, her band on this debut is full of good players including pianist Geoff Keezer, drummer Obed Calvaire, and bassist Joe Martin, and it’s easy to feel at ease with the chamber-jazz material, instantly attractive and approachable from the first sounds of the little piano figure on opener ‘Water Crossing.’

Fourth track ‘Big Footprint’ draws the musical world of Kenny Wheeler to mind, but the record also presents a very different side to Geoff Keezer, particularly if you think of him in terms of say his Rhodes work with Christian McBride’s jazz-rock band. Keezer is instead more like the pianist on a mid-20th century prairie period drama, and Sara Carswell’s violin playing on ‘Waltz for Winter’ completes this sepia tinted impression.

The last track ‘Open Road’, Noordhuis says this about on her blog: “I was thinking to myself ‘I want to write a tune as beautiful as a Pat Metheny ballad.’" And in some ways she has, although Metheny doesn’t spring to mind as an obvious source, which is probably a good sign. It’s a record that’s hard to dislike, but could do with a bit more of an edge at times, although the young trumpeter has a very expressive narrative style that lifts the record’s appeal immeasurably.

Stephen Graham

Released on 9 October in the US

Nadje Noordhuis, pictured top

Kurt Elling

1619 Broadway – The Brill Building Project

Concord ****

An album about songs and the craft of songwriters centred around the famed building in Midtown Manhattan where for some 40 years some of the most universally loved songs in American popular music were created. Elling begins with ‘On Broadway’ and his typically knowing way with both the lyrics of a song and his rapport with the band mean it feels as if he’s making you ‘unhear’ these very familiar songs. Initial listens suggest Bacharach/David’s ’ A House is Not A Home’ and Paul Simon’s ‘American Tune’ are the go-to tracks but Gerry Goffin and Carole King’s ‘Pleasant Valley Sunday’ will intrigue Zappa fans as well.

Released on 25 September. Kurt Elling, with Sheila Jordan, plays the London Jazz Festival at the Queen Elizabeth Hall on 14 November

The Bad Plus

Made Possible

Concord **** SEASON HIGHLIGHT

With this release you get the feeling that The Bad Plus have come up with something radically different. It’s almost as if they have begun all over again, with synthesizers and electronic drums added to the acoustic trio setting. The album comprises a bunch of original, frequently gripping, tunes, and a take on the late Paul Motian’s ‘Victoria’. Pianist Ethan Iverson says that Made Possible “is the sound of getting together in your garage and all committing, no matter what, seeing what you can make up today.” This frequently engrossing album indicates such an approach has more than paid off.

Released on 25 September in the States, and on 22 October internationally. The Bad Plus play Ronnie Scott’s in London on 23 and 24 October.

The Bad Plus photo by Cameron Wittig

Philip Dizack

End of an Era

Truth Revolution ***

Very promising, with a high-register sense of abandon and plenty of guts, trumpeter Philip Dizack is still a new name on a crowded US scene. Slightly reminiscent of Christian Scott (circa the album Anthem) it’s been seven years since the Milwaukee player’s debut, Beyond a Dream. With tracks featuring two separate bands, one with Linda Oh, the bassist most likely to storm through from the underground jazz scene in America, Blue Note artist pianist Aaron Parks and Herbie Hancock drummer Kendrick Scott, and strings even, it’s an ambitious project that came to fruition with the help of some Kickstarter fundraising. If Coldplay ever become remotely hip it will be thanks to the likes of Dizack for covering songs of theirs such as the heart-on-sleeve ‘What If’, the fifth track here.

Stephen Graham

Released on 2 October in the US

Next month at Ronnie Scott’s there’s a fascinating two-night Late Late Show presentation in prospect that aims to summon up the spirit of The Establishment, the legendary Greek Street club founded by Peter Cook that gave birth to the 1960s satire boom.

Actor Keith Allen is to MC the shows, which begin just a half an hour shy of midnight on 19 and 20 September.

The Establishment was a revelation in 1961, and as the Ronnie’s website relates, the club featured uncensored stand-up comedy giving “a platform to radical, political, and anarchic performers (everyone from Lenny Bruce to Barry Humphries)."

Dudley Moore used to play jazz at the Establishment and his role for these evenings now falls to Ronnie’s musical director James Pearson who will play Moore rarities. New comedy, cabaret, burlesque and musical talent as yet to be confirmed are also to play an intrinsic part of the presentation, and Private Eye writer Victor Lewis-Smith is to provide a Pathé News style round-up of the week’s news to begin each evening.

Stephen Graham

For more go to www.ronniescotts.co.uk